6 AWG Crimp Lug Anarchy

slug zitski

Super Anarchist
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If a contractor asked for answers to simple questions on a public forum, I probably would not hire him to begin with.

So it’s a good thing that I have a real job and that this is just a simple-hobby for me :)-)

Happy Sailing and Happy Anarchy!
With the incorrect die . Too small …you have compressed the lug wall and greatly reduced its  wall thickness 

this has consequences 

 

Gabe_nyc

Member
264
22
Bayside
With the incorrect die . Too small …you have compressed the lug wall and greatly reduced its  wall thickness 

this has consequences 
I am unclear. 

Do you think that my incorrect procedure with the incorrect tool resulted in a better or a worse connection than what was there before?

Sports in “real HD” (at 1.485 Gb/s) looks SPECTACULAR and every single blade of grass on the field can be clearly and wondrously seen. What you receive at home is compressed down to (at best)  12 Mb/s with the grass a smeary mess and all sorts of artifacts and JNDs that a trained eye will pick up on.

Does that mean that you should no longer watch your TV where the transmission path is chocked down by limits of cost and practicality, or should you continue to enjoy what is a vastly superior quality to the SD of just a few years ago?

 

Rain Man

Super Anarchist
7,011
1,929
Wet coast.
I simply solder them on the stovetop. No fancy tools. All sizes, same tool. No failures in 50 years. :popcorn:
This ↑↑↑  Maybe without the stovetop unless you are careful or have an understanding wife.  It can be done with a normal soldering iron in good condition or a propane torch.  Put heat shrink on the wire and slide it well back.  Hold the eye with vice grips.  Tin the wire.  Melt solder into the wire receptacle about 1/3 to 1/2 full, and while it is still liquid put the wire in.  Make sure you keep heating until you see the solder amalgamate with the wire strands and eye walls.  Cool.  Slide the heat shrink onto the eye and use heat gun.  Done.

 
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Autonomous

Turgid Member
4,023
1,283
PNW
With the incorrect die . Too small …you have compressed the lug wall and greatly reduced its  wall thickness 

this has consequences 
Will it be okay if I put a hose clamp on it?

Sorry, really. I just like being lippy and have actually learned  good stuff from your posts. Don't let it go to your head though...

 

Diarmuid

Super Anarchist
3,427
1,429
Laramie, WY, USA
I am unclear. 

Do you think that my incorrect procedure with the incorrect tool resulted in a better or a worse connection than what was there before?

Sports in “real HD” (at 1.485 Gb/s) looks SPECTACULAR and every single blade of grass on the field can be clearly and wondrously seen. What you receive at home is compressed down to (at best)  12 Mb/s with the grass a smeary mess and all sorts of artifacts and JNDs that a trained eye will pick up on.

Does that mean that you should no longer watch your TV where the transmission path is chocked down by limits of cost and practicality, or should you continue to enjoy what is a vastly superior quality to the SD of just a few years ago?
Don't mind Zitski.  He's not especially good at people.

 

SimonGH

Member
363
74
Westbrook CT
MIL-T-7928G

I prefer crimp then solder, but it should be strain relieved and supported.

In higher vibration situations there is a potential for the strands to start breaking where the solder stops, since you go from flexible to stiff very abruptly.  A crimped connection actually is slightly less abrupt, which is also the concern with an over crimped terminal.

But we’re talking about very low margin aerospace stuff.  Your cable will be fine.

View attachment MIL-T-7928G.pdf

 
Another consideration for the perfectionists out there is leaving the end of the stranded wire unsealed for moisture to wick into the wire.

Ancor wire is fully tinned to minimize corrosion (and help soldering).

The gap between a crimped terminal and the insulation on the wire is difficult to seal with shrink tubing due to the irregular shape left by the crimper and a non-perfect crimp can wick moisture right through the crimp.

A soldered terminal (without crimp) seals nicely but will pull apart if (seriously) overloaded current-wise.

The vibration issue would seem to be trivial in most marine applications (engines excepted) and can largely be alleviated by proper strain relief and cable clamping.

 

The Q

Super Anarchist
An interesting thread, 

Yes over crimped by one die I think, but for our use it wouldn't make that much difference.

Soldering is not permitted on this type use under our local regulations, which unfortunately seem to have been taken from full blown commercial marine specs, not hobby sailing/ motorboating inland...

I could measure the resistance ..at work, We routinely measure to point one part in a million on resistance, run up to 1200V or 120A, but the cable resistance per metre would have to be taken into account which may well be a significant part of the total.

But for home use my dmm only has 5 1/2 digits.. (an old Dayton 1061) bit over the top for on a boat though so I just use something that bounces is reasonably water protected, and cheap.

 

slug zitski

Super Anarchist
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800
worldwide
An interesting thread, 

Yes over crimped by one die I think, but for our use it wouldn't make that much difference.

Soldering is not permitted on this type use under our local regulations, which unfortunately seem to have been taken from full blown commercial marine specs, not hobby sailing/ motorboating inland...

I could measure the resistance ..at work, We routinely measure to point one part in a million on resistance, run up to 1200V or 120A, but the cable resistance per metre would have to be taken into account which may well be a significant part of the total.

But for home use my dmm only has 5 1/2 digits.. (an old Dayton 1061) bit over the top for on a boat though so I just use something that bounces is reasonably water protected, and cheap.
Soldered terminals are inferior 

when working with pro electricians I only see double crimp nylon terminals , single crimp heat shrink terminals and wire ferrule crimp terminals  used 

solder terminals are rare and only used on plugs , electronics and small wire diameter splices 

 

slug zitski

Super Anarchist
5,054
800
worldwide
An interesting thread, 

Yes over crimped by one die I think, but for our use it wouldn't make that much difference.

Soldering is not permitted on this type use under our local regulations, which unfortunately seem to have been taken from full blown commercial marine specs, not hobby sailing/ motorboating inland...

I could measure the resistance ..at work, We routinely measure to point one part in a million on resistance, run up to 1200V or 120A, but the cable resistance per metre would have to be taken into account which may well be a significant part of the total.

But for home use my dmm only has 5 1/2 digits.. (an old Dayton 1061) bit over the top for on a boat though so I just use something that bounces is reasonably water protected, and cheap.
The high resistance is typically in the mechanical connection , not the wire termination 

After many cycles they become loose and create heat 

sometimes this heat exceeds the melt point of solder 

 

Gabe_nyc

Member
264
22
Bayside
The gap between a crimped terminal and the insulation on the wire is difficult to seal with shrink tubing due to the irregular shape left by the crimper and a non-perfect crimp can wick moisture right through the crimp.

A soldered terminal (without crimp) seals nicely but will pull apart if (seriously) overloaded current-wise.
I made sure to trim back the “ears” and to sand them smooth to the touch. (Yes, I know that removed some of the zinc coating, but I’m aiming for “practical” rather than “perfect”.)

The store I bought the stuff had 2 thicknesses of heat shrink. I bought the heaviest one available and heated with very hot Weller gun until it shrunk tight and until I saw a bead of glue peeking out at both ends.

 

Gabe_nyc

Member
264
22
Bayside
Yes over crimped by one die I think, but for our use it wouldn't make that much difference.
I was afraid that if overdone the crimp sleeve would crack and possibly fall off.

I do not have dye penetrant available, but I looked and felt VERY carefully for cracks and did not detect anything of concern.

For my next tests, I will try to put a .031” (1/32”) shim between the jaws to keep them from closing fully. I will try feeler gauged or whatever till I find a size that will get me to the Ancor spec size of .245”, +/- .005”

I left enough extra wire at all ends that if I find a reason and / or method that results in more sound connection it will be easy to chop off the old ones and redo them.

 
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