65- by 32-foot catamaran 3200sqft of living space

Swimsailor

Super Anarchist
4,668
1,957
WA
Whoa! Whatz up? Weed Stowe was one thing, the Sunderlands too, but this guy is a plumb freaking ANARCHIST if I ever saw one. Fuck Gunboat! I say go the HR! Remember, the Bounty would still be barely floating if not for the stupidity of the Captain. My ancestors found Amerika using a rock as a plotter, in boats without decks.... We should be endorsing the Rod! SA brand it, support the Rod and enter every Oyster regatta in the world! Now, that's anarchy people.

P.S. What's it rate?
Oh no, anarchy is only what Scooter and Clean believe it to be. (Sorry, had to say it) Otherwise, i completely agree. HR has told the boat building world to "suck it" with a big, epoxy coated, Home Depot plywood middle finger.

 

mo fuzz

Super Anarchist
1,332
0
miscut jib said:
Whoa! Whatz up? Weed Stowe was one thing, the Sunderlands too, but this guy is a plumb freaking ANARCHIST if I ever saw one. Fuck Gunboat! I say go the HR! Remember, the Bounty would still be barely floating if not for the stupidity of the Captain. My ancestors found Amerika using a rock as a plotter, in boats without decks.... We should be endorsing the Rod! SA brand it, support the Rod and enter every Oyster regatta in the world! Now, that's anarchy people.

P.S. What's it rate?
Oh no, anarchy is only what Scooter and Clean believe it to be. (Sorry, had to say it) Otherwise, i completely agree. HR has told the boat building world to "suck it" with a big, epoxy coated, Home Depot plywood middle finger.
There is lots of deck space for a kegger. You could probably replace a couple of the internal braces with stripper poles, it'd fit right in.
With all that square footage, maybe he could sell advertising to to the likes of Budweiser. Would help raise funds. Home Depot at least.

 

Raz'r

Super Anarchist
63,141
5,852
De Nile
With all the things obviously under spec, don't get all too critical about galvanized fittings, which have been used for decades. Of course, not home depot zinc coated, but real hot dipped galvanized...

 

clamslapper

Anarchist
With all the things obviously under spec, don't get all too critical about galvanized fittings, which have been used for decades. Of course, not home depot zinc coated, but real hot dipped galvanized...

That's true. Mooring tackle is usually galvanized i guess. It just seems like using galvanized nails below the waterline is awfully sketchy -- i mean, as you hammer or screw them in, I assume you chip off a bit of the zinc.

It's just shocking how fast steel rusts in a marine environment. I have a couple of times mistakenly omitted to use a stainless fitting or bolt on my stupid J24, and just used plated steel ones, but quickly found that anything other than SS goes to hell in matter of days.

 
With all the things obviously under spec, don't get all too critical about galvanized fittings, which have been used for decades. Of course, not home depot zinc coated, but real hot dipped galvanized...

That's true. Mooring tackle is usually galvanized i guess. It just seems like using galvanized nails below the waterline is awfully sketchy -- i mean, as you hammer or screw them in, I assume you chip off a bit of the zinc.

It's just shocking how fast steel rusts in a marine environment. I have a couple of times mistakenly omitted to use a stainless fitting or bolt on my stupid J24, and just used plated steel ones, but quickly found that anything other than SS goes to hell in matter of days.

cheaper SS just takes longer ;)

 

Timmys_Trick_Turkey

Super Anarchist
1,604
2
If he hasnt bothered to glue the stringers to the hull sides, and he hasnt bothered to glue the vertical framing to anything, and he has used external plywood instead of marine plywood, what makes you think he would be using expensive galvanized screws when he can go cheaper: use steel ones and cover their heads with epoxy ?. Sure the hull sides will be continually flexing under the heads of the screws, and the brittle epoxy will crack and let the water in, the thick veneers of the cheaper plywood will rot and the screws will rust, but hey, its being done on a post divorce budget, and he's broke. He cant walk on the floors of the hulls. To do so will require the fitting of extra plywood floors. Boat resale value zero. Soon to be as liability. A box of matches is a good insurance policy atmo.

 

Timmys_Trick_Turkey

Super Anarchist
1,604
2
If he tries to retrofit plywood floors in the bottom of the hulls, he will have to get rid of the upward pointing sharp screw ends first. No power for an angle grinder ? Knowing Rod, he will just screw the plywood down, expecting the points to drive up into the underside of the new floor sheets. But all it will take to start a leak that he wont then be able to get to easily , is just one of those overtightened hull screws deciding its easier to push downwards and out instead, bursting through the expoxy on the outside of the hull or pushing the stringer off the hull plywood. The boat is a fkn timebomb.

 

mikewof

mikewof
45,868
1,246
Hey Rod! I gotta raft and a pirb.... Pm me....
Would you really donate an old raft and a beacon to him? Insanely generous of you, might save his life that gift. I really do feel for the guy, I don't want to see anyone get hurt when one of those plywood sheets shits the bed.

I think I have an old radar reflector somewhere, I'll look for it.

 

Caca Cabeza

Super Anarchist
I don't know what some of you guys are thinking. Crowdsource? Haul and rebuild? Foam? Get Real.

Review time for those that haven't read the entire thread. Let's take a quick look at the typical construction for the hulls, you know, the part that keeps the ocean out.

looking forward in port hull

attachicon.gif
post-180-015338200 1318620417_thumb.jpg

if that doesn't scare the shit out of you, here's looking aft in the port hull.

attachicon.gif
post-180-057684400 1318620484_thumb.jpg

Look at the fucking joints! You've got a 1/2" ply skin screwed to some 2x4's with some 1x2 stringers and a bunch of epoxy slopped all over everything. On the outside you've got some light fiberglass. This is the kind of shit a child would come up with. People this is a 65' hull built like a tool shed!
Looks like lath and plaster. I assume the plaster is on the outside of the hulls?

 

bluenosejr

New member
23
0
If he tries to retrofit plywood floors in the bottom of the hulls, he will have to get rid of the upward pointing sharp screw ends first. No power for an angle grinder ? Knowing Rod, he will just screw the plywood down, expecting the points to drive up into the underside of the new floor sheets. But all it will take to start a leak that he wont then be able to get to easily , is just one of those overtightened hull screws deciding its easier to push downwards and out instead, bursting through the expoxy on the outside of the hull or pushing the stringer off the hull plywood. The boat is a fkn timebomb.
You're missing a very important point.

Typically floors are installed to be level and the hull stringers are slanted.

There is one aspect of the FH design (or lack there of) that will give a few problems.

Since there is a great deal of flex in the hulls and the hulls splay out depending on the wave actions, the floors would have to be gimbled so that they will remain level as the boat sags.

 

mikewof

mikewof
45,868
1,246
I don't know what some of you guys are thinking. Crowdsource? Haul and rebuild? Foam? Get Real.

Review time for those that haven't read the entire thread. Let's take a quick look at the typical construction for the hulls, you know, the part that keeps the ocean out.

looking forward in port hull

post-180-015338200 1318620417_thumb.jpg

if that doesn't scare the shit out of you, here's looking aft in the port hull.

post-180-057684400 1318620484_thumb.jpg

Look at the fucking joints! You've got a 1/2" ply skin screwed to some 2x4's with some 1x2 stringers and a bunch of epoxy slopped all over everything. On the outside you've got some light fiberglass. This is the kind of shit a child would come up with. People this is a 65' hull built like a tool shed!
I looked at this again, something that would help considerably is to bolt a angle across each of those corners, each length by a third, then string those laterally, board over it, fill the void with 2 lb. polyurethane marine foam.
http://uscomposites.com/foam.html

If the foam is too expensive, then instead of a third, maybe a fifth. Build a bilge below the inner hull to drain, then Bob's yer uncle. A drum fills 500 ft^2, so he would need about a drum and a half per hull with an average 8 inch thick fill.

 
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After seeing those hull interior photos, I'm convinced it will fold like a house of cards with the first Bayliner wake it encounters.

Steve

 

WhoaTed

Antichrist
1,359
568
Holland, MI
This thread has now reached legal drinking age. Congrats.

As fucked up as it is, he's gotten it this far which really isn't a good thing since the result of a failure from here on will very possibly cause serious injury or worse. Even if moored to the dock I wouldn't want to be in that thing when one or both of the hulls decide that they've had enough and leave the rest of the structure to fend for itself. Slowly sagging apart is the best case scenario...it goes downhill rapidly from there.

Best of luck Rod, impressive that you've gotten it this far and as unlikely as it is I truly wish that it ends up floating for a long time in some SanFran harbor backwater with the derelicts so that you at least get a place to live out of the project. Sailing or motoring it anywhere else would be foolhardy IMO, don't do it man. It would have been a crazy-cool project if your life savings weren't tied up in this thing. Now it's just sad, I hate to see a man's dreams squashed.

 




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