65- by 32-foot catamaran 3200sqft of living space

We thought maybe someone could send us to a friend instead of strangers.in marin county if u have to ask u cant aford it.and they don't like liveabords.
Most professionals are fine with live-aboards

It's freeloaders that are disliked.

FB- Doug
While you are correct about freeloaders, there is the local regulatory agency BCDC who has tried to out law boats by defining them as fill. They are a burden to marina operators who try to keep liveaboards to a minimum to stay under the radar of this, and any other agency that thinks that can create havoc with people. Liveaboards are no better than trailer trash from the local bureaucrat's point of view... move'em along

 

dockrat

New member
30
0
san refeal
Yup Hotrod missed that 150 lbs should do you just fine. Chain is on the light side but should do if in good condition.

Id like 2 c the design you r talking about. Yes we have tillers to mount.

Rudder linkages. Yours design seems complex and the linkage geometry will lead to the cables being highly stressed. A simpler option is to have two long tillers linked by a crosspiece. running across just behind the back deck. A simple linkage using a single endless line from the two wheels via pulleys to the cross piece will work and the cable stresses will be low. If there is a cable problem you can steer directly by hand. It also simplifies the connection of a windvane. Steering failure is a common cause of people being forced to abandon their boats so having something that is easy to fix is a good idea.

You may already have worked out a way of mounting larger outboards but if not there is a simple system which is widely used out here in the Caribbean on large cats used for the tourist day trip trade. It is low tech and reliable. I can dig out details if you want.

Finally PLYWOOD! Throughout the Eastern Caribbean the locals build boats using construction grade plywood with a single layer of glasscloth. on the outside and paint on the inside. I asked some of the local fishermen who use these daily how long they would expect this to last.. More than 10 years was the answer.
 

SloopJonB

Super Anarchist
70,199
13,336
Great Wet North
Yup Hotrod missed that 150 lbs should do you just fine. Chain is on the light side but should do if in good condition.

Rudder linkages. Yours design seems complex and the linkage geometry will lead to the cables being highly stressed. A simpler option is to have two long tillers linked by a crosspiece. running across just behind the back deck. A simple linkage using a single endless line from the two wheels via pulleys to the cross piece will work and the cable stresses will be low. If there is a cable problem you can steer directly by hand. It also simplifies the connection of a windvane. Steering failure is a common cause of people being forced to abandon their boats so having something that is easy to fix is a good idea.

You may already have worked out a way of mounting larger outboards but if not there is a simple system which is widely used out here in the Caribbean on large cats used for the tourist day trip trade. It is low tech and reliable. I can dig out details if you want.

Finally PLYWOOD! Throughout the Eastern Caribbean the locals build boats using construction grade plywood with a single layer of glasscloth. on the outside and paint on the inside. I asked some of the local fishermen who use these daily how long they would expect this to last.. More than 10 years was the answer.
Same construction methods, materials and scantlings for a small outboard fishing boat and a 65' cat - yeah, that'll work.

 

SloopJonB

Super Anarchist
70,199
13,336
Great Wet North
We thought maybe someone could send us to a friend instead of strangers.in marin county if u have to ask u cant aford it.and they don't like liveabords.
Most professionals are fine with live-aboards

It's freeloaders that are disliked.

FB- Doug
Liveaboards are no better than trailer trash from the local bureaucrat's point of view.
In this case I think they probably got it right.

 

SloopJonB

Super Anarchist
70,199
13,336
Great Wet North
HR-FH

Some people here would like to try and help you.

There are a lot of dick heads here as well.

You got to ignore the idiots and motor mouths and weed out the useful information.

In my opinion, you should concentrate on what you need to survive and be safe where you are.

That buys you time to properly prepare.

All that said, the most important thing you can do right now is get prepared for the winter.

With that in mind, getting a really strong and secure anchoring system in place is going to be really important.

That means large anchors suitable for a boat that size, suitable chain and enough length in your lines.

Also, some set up where the line does not chafe, or wear through what it is mounted to on the boat.

I would make that your first priority.

(Everyone else - SFORightseat was a fake, I am pretty sure HR-FH is the real deal)
Lots of good advice has been given here - and ignored.

Currently, the best advice is to get that thing up the delta away from the weather & seas of SF Bay. Where it is, a big enough set of ground tackle to hold it will simply give it something to hang on to while it tears itself apart during the winter.

 

jerryj2me

Super Anarchist
1,758
1
HR-FH

Some people here would like to try and help you.

There are a lot of dick heads here as well.

You got to ignore the idiots and motor mouths and weed out the useful information.

In my opinion, you should concentrate on what you need to survive and be safe where you are.

That buys you time to properly prepare.

All that said, the most important thing you can do right now is get prepared for the winter.

With that in mind, getting a really strong and secure anchoring system in place is going to be really important.

That means large anchors suitable for a boat that size, suitable chain and enough length in your lines.

Also, some set up where the line does not chafe, or wear through what it is mounted to on the boat.

I would make that your first priority.

(Everyone else - SFORightseat was a fake, I am pretty sure HR-FH is the real deal)
Lots of good advice has been given here - and ignored.

Currently, the best advice is to get that thing up the delta away from the weather & seas of SF Bay. Where it is, a big enough set of ground tackle to hold it will simply give it something to hang on to while it tears itself apart during the winter.
Yeah, probably good advice.

Thing is he went to Richardson instead of going towards the delta.

I find people advising on the rudders almost comic.

There's not enough strength in the hull to support the loads of properly built rudder.

Ditto for strength in the standing rigging.

Time to go pop the popcorn and watch I guess.

 

ZeroTheHero

Super Anarchist
HR-FH

Some people here would like to try and help you.

There are a lot of dick heads here as well.

You got to ignore the idiots and motor mouths and weed out the useful information.

In my opinion, you should concentrate on what you need to survive and be safe where you are.

That buys you time to properly prepare.

All that said, the most important thing you can do right now is get prepared for the winter.

With that in mind, getting a really strong and secure anchoring system in place is going to be really important.

That means large anchors suitable for a boat that size, suitable chain and enough length in your lines.

Also, some set up where the line does not chafe, or wear through what it is mounted to on the boat.

I would make that your first priority.

(Everyone else - SFORightseat was a fake, I am pretty sure HR-FH is the real deal)
Lots of good advice has been given here - and ignored.

Currently, the best advice is to get that thing up the delta away from the weather & seas of SF Bay. Where it is, a big enough set of ground tackle to hold it will simply give it something to hang on to while it tears itself apart during the winter.
Yeah, probably good advice.

Thing is he went to Richardson instead of going towards the delta.

I find people advising on the rudders almost comic.

There's not enough strength in the hull to support the loads of properly built rudder.

Ditto for strength in the standing rigging.

Time to go pop the popcorn and watch I guess.
no kidding. For those that want to "help" the rod, forget the f'n anchor and chain. Find him a new boat. This disaster in slow motion isn't going to be fixed, ever. Heck, try and pull it out of the water, you know, cause sometimes boat need that, and see how well that goes. Rudder loading is likely more than the structure can handle. Hanked on jib? Nevermind the fact the rig isn't likely to handle the load. It's like giving out Band Aids to amputees.........

 
of course you can fake an incoming number. there are apps for that.
So who really shot JFK?
Who.
tumblr_inline_mipoc8lBZ31qz4rgp_zps2ace534a.png


 

silent bob

Super Anarchist
8,934
1,443
New Jersey
HR-FH

Some people here would like to try and help you.

There are a lot of dick heads here as well.

You got to ignore the idiots and motor mouths and weed out the useful information.

In my opinion, you should concentrate on what you need to survive and be safe where you are.

That buys you time to properly prepare.

All that said, the most important thing you can do right now is get prepared for the winter.

With that in mind, getting a really strong and secure anchoring system in place is going to be really important.

That means large anchors suitable for a boat that size, suitable chain and enough length in your lines.

Also, some set up where the line does not chafe, or wear through what it is mounted to on the boat.

I would make that your first priority.

(Everyone else - SFORightseat was a fake, I am pretty sure HR-FH is the real deal)
Lots of good advice has been given here - and ignored.

Currently, the best advice is to get that thing up the delta away from the weather & seas of SF Bay. Where it is, a big enough set of ground tackle to hold it will simply give it something to hang on to while it tears itself apart during the winter.
I'm thinking that the Utah Salt Flats might be far enough up the Delta. Maybe!

 

SloopJonB

Super Anarchist
70,199
13,336
Great Wet North
HR-FH

Some people here would like to try and help you.

There are a lot of dick heads here as well.

You got to ignore the idiots and motor mouths and weed out the useful information.

In my opinion, you should concentrate on what you need to survive and be safe where you are.

That buys you time to properly prepare.

All that said, the most important thing you can do right now is get prepared for the winter.

With that in mind, getting a really strong and secure anchoring system in place is going to be really important.

That means large anchors suitable for a boat that size, suitable chain and enough length in your lines.

Also, some set up where the line does not chafe, or wear through what it is mounted to on the boat.

I would make that your first priority.

(Everyone else - SFORightseat was a fake, I am pretty sure HR-FH is the real deal)
Lots of good advice has been given here - and ignored.

Currently, the best advice is to get that thing up the delta away from the weather & seas of SF Bay. Where it is, a big enough set of ground tackle to hold it will simply give it something to hang on to while it tears itself apart during the winter.
I'm thinking that the Utah Salt Flats might be far enough up the Delta. Maybe!
Get it on the salt lake - maybe that'll pickle the ply enough to keep it from rotting.

 

Windward

Super Anarchist
4,722
786
You may be onto something!

I see a BurningMan in FH's future, followed by a try for the land speed record over at Bonneville?

 

U20guy2

Super Anarchist
12,330
3
We thought maybe someone could send us to a friend instead of strangers.in marin county if u have to ask u cant aford it.and they don't like liveabords.
Most professionals are fine with live-aboards

It's freeloaders that are disliked.

FB- Doug
While you are correct about freeloaders, there is the local regulatory agency BCDC who has tried to out law boats by defining them as fill. They are a burden to marina operators who try to keep liveaboards to a minimum to stay under the radar of this, and any other agency that thinks that can create havoc with people. Liveaboards are no better than trailer trash from the local bureaucrat's point of view... move'em along
I once chatted up a guy at the Alameda Boat show he was buying some new interior bits. Standard BSing while checking stuff out he explained how they lived aboard in a marina just South of SF and had just bought the boat next door so their 10yr old could have a bedroom! Umm yea like there are people who live aboard and are either in the middle of getting their land based stuff delt with so they can split via kicking the dock lines off, there are part time live aboard types during the week who crash on their boats close to the office then go home.

Then you have LIFE aboards who seem to not only exist 100% of the time aboard for a very long time but in this case they multiply! Ahhhhhh!!!

 

victorvector

New member
18
0
Australia
Yup Hotrod missed that 150 lbs should do you just fine. Chain is on the light side but should do if in good condition.

Rudder linkages. Yours design seems complex and the linkage geometry will lead to the cables being highly stressed. A simpler option is to have two long tillers linked by a crosspiece. running across just behind the back deck. A simple linkage using a single endless line from the two wheels via pulleys to the cross piece will work and the cable stresses will be low. If there is a cable problem you can steer directly by hand. It also simplifies the connection of a windvane. Steering failure is a common cause of people being forced to abandon their boats so having something that is easy to fix is a good idea.

You may already have worked out a way of mounting larger outboards but if not there is a simple system which is widely used out here in the Caribbean on large cats used for the tourist day trip trade. It is low tech and reliable. I can dig out details if you want.

Finally PLYWOOD! Throughout the Eastern Caribbean the locals build boats using construction grade plywood with a single layer of glasscloth. on the outside and paint on the inside. I asked some of the local fishermen who use these daily how long they would expect this to last.. More than 10 years was the answer.
Some of the best advice given here .

 

HR'FH

Member
498
0
loch lomond
I May have put it rong ,we have done so much we have a difficult time trying to keep track,we focus on getting things done instead of how much we do. This is a rather daunting project.

 




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