65- by 32-foot catamaran 3200sqft of living space

Pertinacious Tom

Importunate Member
62,810
1,994
Punta Gorda FL
Well, it seems as though we must now await a major storm/wind event (or the sudden and carastrophic explosion of too-long sealed waste tanks) to re-engender some interest in this thread. It would seem that we were ALL incorrect as to

  • The ability of this abortion to actually float for longer than ten minutes
  • The amount of CPE (or equivalent) used to waterproof the construction material (it IS still "floating", innit?)
  • The ability of a deck screw to continue to hold the construction material together despite the high seas encountedred in the transit to Hawai.... Oh. Wait. Sorry. nevvamind
  • The longevity of the many and varied sock puppets who tried manfully to defend HizZonner Da Bitah.

I still wanna know where he got the locomotive wheels!
I said long ago in this thread that it will stay together right up until it encounters waves under sail.

My theory has not yet been tested, but I'm standing by it.

 

edouard

Super Anarchist
1,014
0
Well, it seems as though we must now await a major storm/wind event (or the sudden and carastrophic explosion of too-long sealed waste tanks) to re-engender some interest in this thread. It would seem that we were ALL incorrect as to

  • The ability of this abortion to actually float for longer than ten minutes
  • The amount of CPE (or equivalent) used to waterproof the construction material (it IS still "floating", innit?)
  • The ability of a deck screw to continue to hold the construction material together despite the high seas encountedred in the transit to Hawai.... Oh. Wait. Sorry. nevvamind
  • The longevity of the many and varied sock puppets who tried manfully to defend HizZonner Da Bitah.

I still wanna know where he got the locomotive wheels!
I said long ago in this thread that it will stay together right up until it encounters waves under sail.

My theory has not yet been tested, but I'm standing by it.
Waves alone, even while mooring or under engine power, should get the job done.

 

Somebody Else

a person of little consequence
7,680
845
PNW
Looks like a proper anker would be a lot cheaper.
Noobs don't "get" ankers. All they know is 'heavy' and 'on the bottom'. The ability of one anchor to bite through grass and another one to hold well in mud is just too scientific. They are puzzled why all ankers don't look like Popeye's tattoo. I mean, that's what an anker looks like, am I right?

popeyes-tattoo.png


 

Steam Flyer

Sophisticated Yet Humble
45,305
10,136
Eastern NC
Looks like a proper anker would be a lot cheaper.
Noobs don't "get" ankers. All they know is 'heavy' and 'on the bottom'. The ability of one anchor to bite through grass and another one to hold well in mud is just too scientific. They are puzzled why all ankers don't look like Popeye's tattoo. I mean, that's what an anker looks like, am I right?

popeyes-tattoo.png
And besides, everybody knows that ankers are primarily used to conk bad guys on the head. No issues about "holding power"or scope or any of that yotty crapola

FB- Doug

 

Remodel

Super Anarchist
10,314
919
None
I loved the wanker puppets who went crying to the Modz

That I was takinh away from the Purity

Of this sugar free gummy bear quarantine latrine

Ok boo-day for the wankers !!!!!
What the fuck are you babbling about now?

Please make sense if you are going to post.
Check out the reviews on amazon for sugar free gummy bears. All will become clear over time - - - in a manner of speaking...

 

Sand crab

Member
307
1
Montana
Many of us have Da-Woody on ignore which means all we see is a little one line box showing that he posted. We can click on that to see his posts if we want. But when you guys quote him then there his post is. So please please refrain from quoting him or just try that ignore. Click on that arrow by your name at the top of this page and the instructions are there.

I have been reporting on the weather in SF because it affects the FH. San Francisco did get a little bit of rain the last few days of January. But, that 1/4" or less was it for a month that usually gets over 4". The next 10 days are forecast with rain here and there but no major storms or wind events.

 
232
0
Many of us have Da-Woody on ignore which means all we see is a little one line box showing that he posted. We can click on that to see his posts if we want. But when you guys quote him then there his post is. So please please refrain from quoting him or just try that ignore. Click on that arrow by your name at the top of this page and the instructions are there.

I have been reporting on the weather in SF because it affects the FH. San Francisco did get a little bit of rain the last few days of January. But, that 1/4" or less was it for a month that usually gets over 4". The next 10 days are forecast with rain here and there but no major storms or wind events.
having da woodcunt on ignore is a god damn blessing, kinda like eating a big mexican dinner, then not being able to drop a duce the next morning but just before noon it hits you. so you run, or more like waddle to the head and you barley sit down before you explode the mother of all steaming piles................ahhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh what relief

 

Pertinacious Tom

Importunate Member
62,810
1,994
Punta Gorda FL
...

Here's a fun game that's sort of FH related:

Guess how long this plywood and sawhorse table has been sitting outside in my yard. Extra credit for guessing the age and nature of the blue and white stuff. Bonus extra credit for guessing the grade of plywood.

plywood-sawhorses.jpg


Here's the edge:

plywood-edge.jpg
At this time of year, the table usually dries out, but we had four inches of rain last week.

It's still hanging in there.

Yeah, but it's not on a boat, nor is it encased in plastic, so it might not be all that relevant.

This is the underside of the mast step on a 1977 Com-Pac 16.

cp-16-mast-step.jpg


The large hole in the center of the plywood is where this piece was screwed to the support post underneath. The other four holes are for the mast step bolts. One or more of the forward three leaked at some point and that wood was soft. Someone came along and injected epoxy into the whole area. There were hardened rivers of the stuff alongside the plywood and that curve at the right side of the pic is where it pooled up between mast step and (now removed) interior skin.

The epoxy did not do what people say it does: soak into the plywood and stabilize it. It went around. The punky wood was easily removed with a chisel. The pooled epoxy does seem to me to have contributed to two hard spots at the corners of the step molding, resulting in cracks that went all the way through in both corners. Those cracks may have occurred anyway, but the presence of the epoxy made repairing them without complete removal a lot harder, if possible.

The remaining wood after that photo was taken was much harder to remove. I cut through the wood and epoxy with a Fein Multimaster every half inch or so and popped off the pieces with a chisel.

The stuff down at the aft end was unnaturally tough. Here's my chisel buried in the plywood.

cp-16-step-chisel.jpg


6 inches away, this plywood fell apart in my hands and disintegrated on contact with a chisel. This piece was stronger than any new plywood I have chiseled. It had a little more "give" to it, but no "give up" in it at all. I'm trying to pop off a half inch by half inch section that is already cut free, and the chisel is under it!!

cp-16-step-trimmed.jpg


I chiseled off the remaining wood, only gouging out a little fiberglass in the process. The horizontal line near the center of the photo is the only place that I scraped fiberglass with the Multimaster and I could feel it happening.

The epoxy injection "cure" that someone tried seems to me to have done little good and possibly caused harm. It certainly made repair more difficult. Unreinforced epoxy shatters easily if tapped with a chisel and when you get to fiberglass it feels different, so removing it was not as hard as I thought it might be up in the corners and such.

So for those waiting with baited breath for the Flyin' Hawaiian to disintegrate like wet paper, you can breathe now. This is 1977 plywood. Some of the cabin top core drained out in liquid form. Some of that piece of wood (which was oddly dry, but had been wet at some point) fell apart in my hands, but what was left had plenty of strength. Who knows how much the boat was sailed like that.

 
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