65- by 32-foot catamaran 3200sqft of living space

U20guy2

Super Anarchist
12,330
3
LOL damn he did splash it.

Anyone know how much water the silted in Napa marina has? Seems like a logical parking spot the mud will keep it square when it gets loaded with grow op gear.

 

Binnacle Bat

New member
Don't forget, now that it's actually floating in somebody's jurisdiction, otherwise disinterested bystanders now have an interest in lending pumps, tows, etc. to get it out of their hair. Er... speaking of jurisdiction, how is it that a floating vessel can exist in the People's Republic of California without registration stickers? And what is the tax on something like that, anyway? Can you get Liberian flagged over the internet?
He's done almost as good. Apparently the Flyin' Hawaiian is documented, so all has to worry about is the Coast Guard. No state registration required. He is still subject to CA taxes, on which I am no expert. As long as he slips under the CG radar, either by slipping up a slough in the Delta, or buying a slot amongst the Sausalito houseboats, he is good. Having splashed without a major train wreck, he is probably good to go, as long as no-one knowledgeable from the Coast Guard comes aboard and says this is not a documentable vessel, where is this and that bit of required equipment, yadda, yadda.

Bilge pumps, we don't need no steenkin' bilge pumps.

If he tries to sail across SF bay in a 20 kt breeze, he will attract the attention of the Coast Guard, if he doesn't turn into a debris field first.

 

Caca Cabeza

Super Anarchist
Go dude, go! Get a two way AIS and just set the hydraulic AP's... Point and shoot with a good weather window. Put a few fuel bladders on her and motor at 6 until you hit the trades.
Quick math: 6 knots ÷ (65 x 32 3,200) = 0.00000901442 x 18 hp = fail.

Back of the envelope, of course.

He could, however, enter the fourth mode, or install a flux capacitor. In either event, he has a serious risk of the front falling off in the environment.

Lastly, assumung he gets it under sail, what will it rate?

 

shaggy

Super Anarchist
10,050
1,075
Co
Go dude, go! Get a two way AIS and just set the hydraulic AP's... Point and shoot with a good weather window. Put a few fuel bladders on her and motor at 6 until you hit the trades.
Quick math: 6 knots ÷ (65 x 32 3,200) = 0.00000901442 x 18 hp = fail.

Back of the envelope, of course.

He could, however, enter the fourth mode, or install a flux capacitor. In either event, he has a serious risk of the front falling off in the environment.

Lastly, assumung he gets it under sail, what will it rate?
Golf Clap.......

Only thing you missed using is landt.. :rolleyes:

 

Somebody Else

a person of little consequence
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PNW
Seems unlikely, your first concern about the torsion still seems like a bigger concern, plywood has a decent shear strength, between 2000 and 3000 lbs. depending on orientation, It should hold with a directional stress like that. But the torsion applies the stress to a few "hot points" which is when connections fail with huge panels like that ... thus the age-worn wisdom of using relatively narrow planks of length, you spread out torsional stress to many connections and allow them to move laterally before sealing again rather than pop at the edges.
What everyone has been seeing in the not-very-revealing construction detail pics is a distinct shortage of faying surface. This entire "boat" is so full of point loads it's scary. My favorite fix of all time is how he "tuned out" the drooping hulls on the trailer with a steel beam and some wire rope.

 

Timmys_Trick_Turkey

Super Anarchist
1,604
2
The wire rope is probably the only thing holding the hulls together. The inner face distortion which from the stern looks like a concave of the inner face, might actually instead be a serious convex distortion at the bow, where the wire cable is attached and trying to rip itself out. In flat water and unladen, the hulls are either tearing apart outwards, or collapsing under water pressure. In a seaway, holding this boat together will be like trying to nail jelly to the ceiling. About now, he will be asking himself why he never fibreglassed the inside of the hulls, how in hell he can stop the hulls from collapsing or having the joining wire pull out, and how he will hold all three main pieces together.... My prediction is it will be back on the ramp for desperate reinforcing and repairs before that wire rips out, or in any case, before the bilge pump expires in a couple of days.

 
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shaggybaxter

Super Anarchist
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Australia
Ever watch a moment on TV that, whilst feeling compelled to leave the room, you have to stand in the doorway, horribly fascinated to see what's coming next.....

Cue please.

 

Tucky

Super Anarchist
3,502
33
Maine
Like the stock market, Hot Rod has climbed a wall of worry. He has made it much farther then most thought and he is still at it, while many here have quietly shifted their "obviously he'll never" point a few steps.

I wonder how much farther some here may need to shift- boat is in the water, floating near it's lines with no frantic pump action and he is still hard at work. I'm rooting for him, hoping that his goals adapt and his smile continues- good on him.

 

Bugsy

Super Anarchist
2,554
861
Canada
I don't recall one person who was 100% convinced Reid Stowe would successfully circumnavigate the world in his ferro-tub.

But he did and no one got hurt. I am no fan of RS but he has sailed (well, drifted) around the world and I haven't.

Let's not underestimate creativity and determination.

That said, this boat is so seriously flawed in so many ways, I can't see it holding together for long.

The entertainment value of this thread is priceless!

 

bluenosejr

New member
23
0
.... I'm rooting for him, hoping that his goals adapt and his smile continues- good on him.
I also hope that his goals change. He has accomplished a great deal (not in any way that would allow him succeeding at his final goal) and it would be a shame to see it all end in an epic failure.

The boat would make a great seashore hot dog stand if it was dragged out of the water now. There is a great history of seashore follies, this could be yet one more.

img0110.png


 
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mikewof

mikewof
45,868
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Like the stock market, Hot Rod has climbed a wall of worry. He has made it much farther then most thought and he is still at it, while many here have quietly shifted their "obviously he'll never" point a few steps.

I wonder how much farther some here may need to shift- boat is in the water, floating near it's lines with no frantic pump action and he is still hard at work. I'm rooting for him, hoping that his goals adapt and his smile continues- good on him.
I'm proud of his progress and want him to do well too, which is going to be a tad difficult with a 2 square meter hole suddenly erupting in the hull of his boat where a sheet of plywood used to be.
I can't forget the sound of a tiny guy with a jackhammer pounding on the keel of my old stout boat for four hours in a storm. How is a squarish hull going to take that kind of stress with the bridgedeck concurrently clawing at the seams from the top?

What if he filled those hulls with giant inflatable sponsons? Maybe hire an industrial home foam wall insulator, just fill them up with foam then lash the bridgedeck down with steel netting?

 
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Dirc

Member
51
0
yeah, expanding and rigid foam insulation throughout the bottom 4 feet of each side is a very good idea...

I dont really know how much strength it provides when 'hard', if it is not rigid when cured, it won't do much good

lilmurray, please please update, get on board and get pics of the bilge

 

Steam Flyer

Sophisticated Yet Humble
45,586
10,275
Eastern NC
I don't recall one person who was 100% convinced Reid Stowe would successfully circumnavigate the world in his ferro-tub.

But he did and no one got hurt. I am no fan of RS but he has sailed (well, drifted) around the world and I haven't.

Let's not underestimate creativity and determination.

That said, this boat is so seriously flawed in so many ways, I can't see it holding together for long.

The entertainment value of this thread is priceless!

It also shows the value of having low standards. Most people would not go to sea at all on the Void-Ho derelict. Most people would not sail... or even want to be seen on... a catamaran with hulls that look a giant plyboard waffle iron and wires holding the hulls from splaying out.

Personally, I am eager to see him hoist his mom-made 1600 sq ft lateen sail.

I'm also doubtful but hopeful. As long as the builder perseveres, and keeps his goals flexible, he could end up at "success"

FB- Doug

 

Somebody Else

a person of little consequence
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Like the stock market, Hot Rod has climbed a wall of worry. He has made it much farther then most thought and he is still at it, while many here have quietly shifted their "obviously he'll never" point a few steps.
That's a pretty smug attitude for you to take.

I am not the most vocal here, but I have made no attempt to hide my opinions that he would never be able to move Flyin' Hawaiian to the ramp without it collapsing on itself. I have shifted my point of failure a few steps but there was never an "obviously" anything. I freely admit to being wrong about it being moved without breaking apart.

What HotRod has demonstrated repeatedly is that he is quick on his feet, assessing a problem and addressing it and eventually that may result in some sort of seaworthy craft. At that time I expect the Flyin' Hawaiian to be more repair than original structure. That is a very common development path for grass-roots, start-with-nothing design -n- build.

As it stands there are a few observable features that one could assume apply to the parts we can't see.

  • It's built more like a house than a boat.
  • The fixes have all been the bare minimum to patch the immediate problem.
  • All the parts we can see look under-built. Specifically rudders, steering and chainplates.
 




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