97-year-old Galway Hooker 'Loveen' Sails for the Dutch Canals

Boathavn

Hof & Gammel Dansk - Skål !
From Wikipedia:

The Galway hooker (Irish: húicéir) is a traditional fishing boat used in Galway Bay off the west coast of Ireland. The hooker was developed for the strong seas there. It is identified by its sharp, clean entry, bluff bow, marked tumblehome and raked transom. Its sail plan consists of a single mast with a main sail and two foresails. Traditionally, the boat is black (being coated in pitch) and the sails are a dark red-brown (from a wood-based preservative the flax linen sails were soaked in).
These boats were used to carry turf to be used as fuel across Galway Bay from Connemara and County Mayo to the Aran Islands and the Burren. The boats often brought limestone on the return journeys, to neutralize the acid soils of Connemara and Mayo. (And probably barrels of Poitín (Irish moonshine) too - editorial comment).

The Bád Mór (big boat) ranges in length from 10.5 to 13.5 metres (35 to 44 feet). The smaller Leathbhád (half-boat) is about 10 metres (28 feet) in length. Both the Bád Mór and Leathbhád are decked forward of the mast.
When the Irish settlers at Boston in North America needed fishing craft, they built the hooker that they knew from home. These boats became known as 'Boston Hookers', 'Irish Cutters' (in official reports), or 'Paddy Boats'.

Galway Hookers design are thought to be of Dutch origin, Hooker being a derivation of the Dutch "Hoeker" - a traditional workboat found in the south of Holland.

The ‘Galway Hooker Sailing Club’s Loveen Tour’ will take the 97-year-old vessel to represent Ireland’s traditional nautical heritage at NaWaKa, the Sea Scout's International National Water Kamp
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From Galway to Holland with Love
27th July 2022
Tom MacSweeney
From afloat.ie
The first appearance of a Galway Hooker on the Dutch canals is likely to create a lot of attention and there may even be links found between the traditional West of Ireland boat and historic vessels in Holland
The ‘Galway Hooker Sailing Club’s Loveen Tour’ will take the 97-year-old vessel to represent Ireland’s traditional nautical heritage at NaWaKa, the Scout International National Water Kamp held every four years in the Netherlands with over 7,000 participants.
Loveen, whose story captivated the Galway sailing community during her two-year restoration, will be accompanied by 40 Galway Sea Scouts, their leaders and family members at the event.
The gleoiteog was originally built in Galway in 1925 and gifted by the Dolan family in 2011 to become a sail training vessel for the Port of Galway Sea Scouts. The Scouts needed help to make her seaworthy, so the Galway Hooker Sailing Club volunteers brought Loveen back to her former glory, starting work in 2019. In October 2021, she was launched and has made an impressive sight since when seen sailing in the Claddagh and on Galway Bay.
Next month Loveen will join a flotilla of other national sailing vessels during Nawaka, from August 7 to 18 in Landgoed Zeewolde, 40 km east of Amsterdam.

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Picture: connachttribune.ie
 
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Wavedancer II

Anarchist
720
187
Nice history; slight correction from the following

Galway Hookers design are thought to be of Dutch origin, Hooker being a derivation of the Dutch "Hoeker" - a traditional workboat found in the south of Holland.

More accurately: A workboat originating in The Netherlands. Mostly used for fishing.
(there's not much water in the South of Holland!)
 
A good video following their construction (54 min, CC on)

A great film about 'hooker construction. Thanks for sharing!

Here is some good vintage footage of 'hookers in operation



To put this all in context, one also needs to watch "Man of Aran". This a 1934 fictional documentary film directed by Robert J. Flaherty about life on the Aran Islands off the western coast of Ireland outside of Galway Bay. A primary use of the Galway hookers were trading with the Aran islanders. The (sheep wool) weavers of Aran were famous for the cable knit jumper (sweater), distributed for many years out of a single shop in Galway run by an old woman who smoked liked a fiend and had a curious dog.

It portrays characters living in premodern conditions, documenting their daily routines such as fishing off high cliffs, farming potatoes where there is little soil and hunting for huge basking sharks to get liver oil for lamps. Flaherty invented the "docudrama" we know today, staging scenes for maximum interest and using the most photogenic of available characters.

 




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