A “famous” day in cruising boat history

Jud - s/v Sputnik

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What actually is 'normal', and if being so is a good or a bad thing, is ofc a debate well above my pay grade. Certainly not all the odd ducks are 'unpleasantly odd', some are 'quite pleasantly odd' especially if you have some understanding/appreciation of their passion.
None of this shit is normal. I’m about 60-70 hours into a complete overhaul of my deck surface/non-skid. Completely unplanned until earlier this spring when I had to redo the chain locker lid (non-skid failed, I stripped it off, painted and then covered with crushed walnut shells then re-coated several times), and suddenly realized I’d better sort out my failing deck non-skid/incipient rust areas “one day” - which suddenly turned into right now since it’s either this summer or next summer or the summer after - and I don’t want to deal with this then (or now - but now is the best time to get something started and done). Remember all those inquiries I was making here a few weeks/months ago about Dyneema, jacklines, rigging, etc etc - well now I’ve completely deep dived into this instead, out of necessity, putting every other interesting/useful upgrade (rigging, jacklines, etc etc etc) project on hold until this massive repair is done. It is so totally not normal to own a boat and repair and outfit it for extended voyaging! :) It’s epic.

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Fah Kiew Tu

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Tasmania, Australia
None of this shit is normal. I’m about 60-70 hours into a complete overhaul of my deck surface/non-skid. Completely unplanned until earlier this spring when I had to redo the chain locker lid (non-skid failed, I stripped it off, painted and then covered with crushed walnut shells then re-coated several times)

.... or you could have stripped it, cleaned it then painted it with Kiwigrip, once and done.

I'm not at all impressed with the crushed shell, sand or cork in paint approach myself.

Nobody that goes to sea for pleasure is 'normal' anyway so it's not worth worrying about.

FKT
 
The beauty of actively moving is the lack of the interwebs crutch and having to make do with what's at hand and who you have around. I read a few of Bernards books years ago and liked a bit of it, mostly the abstract thinking bits. Agree with Evans the single hander world has a bit a weird going for it but no more so than the ever sure lemmings in the arc ralley or insert "x" cruising ralley. At the end of the day alot of people all want to be told it's all going to be ok. Even when that's shit advise and the reality is very much to the contrary. The ones who just go get lumped into the all encompassing group of non conformists so sometimes get a undeserving bad rap. The true freegan ones are a shit show to behold but I've learned to never judge even if it means keeping a really good eye on the valuables. The life in the margins tends to have alot too it.
 

Dilligaf0220

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Not The Caribbean
I have never understood the adulation for Moitessier.
Shocker that two Canadians in a row wouldn't get it. Guessing neither of those two Canadians have ever been on a solo canoe trip that lasted longer than a weekend either.

Moitessier never paddled the Boreal forests of Canada, but I'll wager he wouldn't hate it. There is a Zen feeling, to being alone, in the environment. It is nice to feel small.

That's the central tenet to the books of Moitessier I've read.
 

accnick

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Well, to write a book in the first place you have to be narcissistic. As if your words and experience mattered to others? But really, people only write things because no one around them gives a damn and they need another audience.
Well, I guess I resemble that remark.

Do you really think that, or did you forget the purple font?

Are you applying the same logic to those who write magazine articles, etc?
 

Elegua

Generalissimo
Well, I guess I resemble that remark.

Do you really think that, or did you forget the purple font?

Are you applying the same logic to those who write magazine articles, etc?
I was paraphrasing Kundera, and I think there is some truth there.

"The reason we write books is that our kids don't give a damn. We turn to an anonymous world because our wife stops up her ears when we talk to her."

And before you get offended, also ask why am I (as in me, not you) posting on an anonymous forum? We are all guilty.
 

estarzinger

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I was paraphrasing Kundera,
Nice. Thanks. Good to learn something every day, and that made me good for today.

Beth's motivation for writing was probably complicated. The actual money was not unimportant when we were on a cruising budget, kept us in beans and diesel, not have to touch the capital, but most probably not her primary motivation. I think that might well be something internal - exploring (and learning about) things by writing about them. But there was also an external aspect - some mix of positive feedback/praise and of helping others. Hard to know which was most important, but I would guess the internal because she kept writing even when there was no (or little) external feedback.
 
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estarzinger

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It is so totally not normal to own a boat and repair and outfit it for extended voyaging! :) It’s epic.
I so loved the cruising life, but so hated boat ownership - obviously, that made it all hmmmm complicated :)

Something I like about the bicycles is that with effort and money you can make one 'near perfect' and the gear just works so well. On the boat I was always frustrated at the make-do and the shit quality of even the 'better' gear.
 

Ajax

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A good part of what I write here isn't for the audience. It's how I process experiences and how I process something that I'm going to do, like plan a trip or make a repair. It's just a sounding board, especially the T-33 rehab thread.

I don't expect anything I write to "matter" to anyone else on an emotional level but if it can help someone, like Brae Brun who is rehabbing his own T-33 then I'm glad that they found it useful.
 

Ajax

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Edgewater, MD
I so loved the cruising life, but so hated boat ownership - obviously, that made it all hmmmm complicated
I like both. To me, boat ownership is like home ownership. No matter where you live, there will be maintenance and renovations.
Boat ownership is better because it allows for a change of scenery. I'm not a "serial fettler" like the people in Dylan Winter's posts, the fellows who basically live in the yards wearing "boiler suits and beanies" and never actually go anywhere.
 

estarzinger

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"You show up as kind of a loner."
We do (at least many of us) evolve, develop and change as we age. I know I am a quite different person than I was at 25 - beth says I was a streight razor blade at 25 and am now a teddy bear :) I think perhaps you may have developed and changed. My impression is that you enjoy (and are good at) teaching, leading, and organizing - perhaps one or two people (or a small group) at a time (rather than a mob) but still enjoy and get recharged by such interactions.
 

Elegua

Generalissimo
I guess I wasn't being fair by badly paraphrasing and not giving the context of that quote.

Kundera believes that everyone needs an audience of some kind; for some that's an invisible public audience. Think movie star. For others it's an audience of people they know. Those are the, "tireless hosts of cocktail parties". Still others need the audience of the people they love. And last, and perhaps bringing it back to solo sailors, "those who live in the imaginary eyes of those who are not present".

When we lose our audience, we feel the light has gone out of our lives. The people in the first and third category are in the most precarious situation. Fame vanishes and the people we love die. The people in the last category are the safest. People in the second category are in the middle; they can always fill their room with new guests.

We're human, and kind of squishy, so I think it's possible we can sit in more than one bucket at a time and perhaps move from category to category as we grow.
 
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estarzinger

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everyone needs an audience
There is an interesting observation here. But it is a delicate one. If you overstate it you end up in 'tree falling in the forest' territory while if you underplay it you don't capture the complexity of human motivation.

Solitary confinement (with minimal 'audience') is possibly an 'interesting' foil for discussing long solo solo sailing. It is generally (outside the US) viewed as a form of torture. And in some physical ways, it could be 'less harsh' than solo sailing on a small boat. But sailing is your choice and you can end it, while solitary confinement is (often, but not always) not voluntary. Solo sailing often (not always) has a goal/reward, more than just surviving, While solitary (I guess) is mostly about enduring/surviving it. Those two factors would seem to make a quite big difference.
 

Israel Hands

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Kundera believes that everyone needs an audience of some kind; for some that's an invisible public audience. Think movie star. For others it's an audience of people they know. Those are the, "tireless hosts of cocktail parties". Still others need the audience of the people they love. And last, and perhaps bringing it back to solo sailors, "those who live in the imaginary eyes of those who are not present".

When we lose our audience, we feel the light has gone out of our lives.
Sort of related...I wouldn't want to be a solo sailor for the same reason I didn't want to be alone for long when I was young. The company of women is too important. After a few days, I'm talking to myself. (Well, nowadays when I'm working on the boat I'm talking to myself.)

We went to see James Taylor the other night. It'd been 40 years since I'd seen him last. He still has the same self-effacing manner with his audience, but more talkative. I think that audience is very important to him despite his seeming like an introvert.
 

Elegua

Generalissimo
Yeah, get too reductive, things lose their meaning. It's often that balance that I often miss; simple enough to understand, complex enough to retain the important nuance.

At the risk of over-simplification, I put the solo cruiser in the category of people who might live in the imaginary eye's of others. They most live in their head and have imaginary relationships. If that is the 'audience' they need, they are set for life. The example given is a guy who writes his father that he has never sees nor talks to and who has rarely if ever written back. The construct of having a father is the important part, not the actual father.

I personally believe involuntary solitary confinement is torture. The person going in is not equipped mentally and they come out damaged for life. Successful solo sailors have the mental tools to survive. Now in the days of YouTube, one guy, Patrick Laine, literally has what he calls, "phantom shipmates".
 

SloopJonB

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A good part of what I write here isn't for the audience. It's how I process experiences and how I process something that I'm going to do, like plan a trip or make a repair. It's just a sounding board, especially the T-33 rehab thread.

I don't expect anything I write to "matter" to anyone else on an emotional level but if it can help someone, like Brae Brun who is rehabbing his own T-33 then I'm glad that they found it useful.
+1

Aside from the stress relief I get from insulting the hopeless sociopolitical morons in PA, the reason I write here grew out of a single experience I had years ago.

I was at the memorial for an old friend/acquaintance who owned the boatyard I have used for the past 35 years.

His daughter was eulogizing him and said "A lot of knowledge died with Chris".

That made me think about all the hard won knowledge I had acquired over the decades and made me think I should share it around while there was time - no point in other people having to fuck up the way I had to to learn it all. :)
 

Fah Kiew Tu

Curmudgeon, First Rank
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+1

Aside from the stress relief I get from insulting the hopeless sociopolitical morons in PA, the reason I write here grew out of a single experience I had years ago.

I was at the memorial for an old friend/acquaintance who owned the boatyard I have used for the past 35 years.

His daughter was eulogizing him and said "A lot of knowledge died with Chris".

That made me think about all the hard won knowledge I had acquired over the decades and made me think I should share it around while there was time - no point in other people having to fuck up the way I had to to learn it all. :)
So - when do you plan on starting?

Sorry - couldn't resist - bad FKT, bad...

FKT
 

Jud - s/v Sputnik

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.... or you could have stripped it, cleaned it then painted it with Kiwigrip, once and done.

I'm not at all impressed with the crushed shell, sand or cork in paint approach myself.
Yeah, I very, very briefly considered stripping off the old non-skid but decided that it would be a heinously unpleasant job, and would take up most if not all of my summer - the only time I could easily do it is in summer when boat is on a mooring, so no reliable access to power (like for a heat gun to help lift up the old non-skid) - the next option would be putting the boat in a covered shed at a relatively distant boat yard at $2k/month plus mast removal/re-step cost and travel lift out/in. No time for any of that, and the shed option is a lot more expensive, so I went for the third “at least get something done now” option, as I’m getting tired of boat ownership...the “dream” is there but always seems very distant and unreachable, and things like this deck repair make me very uninterested anymore. Anyway, with any luck the 2-part urethane paint will penetrate the tiny pores in the old Vetus non-skid, that I heavily ground down and patched here and there, sealing it up. Time will tell. If it fails in years to come, at that point I may have by then erased the pretty unpleasant memory of this recent deck repair work, allowing me to go all in at that point, stripping it all off, perhaps in retirement with more time and money to do a proper job as you suggest.

But the other thing I wonder about KiwiGrip on a metal boat - as I have it now, the old non-skid still there, but now coated, the non-skid insulates the deck surface, so it doesn’t get so hot. It seems like using only KiwiGrip on a metal deck would let it get very hot.

(I was also wondering about applying KiwiGrip over top of the non-skid, I.e., avoiding using walnut shells and instead getting non-skid properties from the paint’s texture - but I wonder if it would adhere well to the existing (heavily sanded down) non-skid. The KiwiGrip product info says it sticks to wood, metal, fibreglass- probably not common at all to apply over glued-on non-skid pads - but it would almost seem the ideal way to do it (on a metal boat), since you get the insulative property of the non-skid pad, and the non-skid property without using a grit in paint. My boat is a big compromise of time and money...the deck repair has just gotta last until NZ, rather than just Mexico or French Polynesia, since there are good marine services/materials there, and no language barrier in work yards...but first, gotta get out of Canada, across the Pacific, and then to NZ :)

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