A big project!

allene222

Super Anarchist
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SF Bay
I have seen several projects this ambitious.  I just have never seen one finish.  People work for years and then just disappear.

There was one old wood boat rebuilt around here.  It was Freda, an 1885 32 foot yacht.  The rebuild took 8 years and cost $500,000.  It is the oldest sailing boat on the West Coast.

One of the unfinished projects was a boat like mine, an L-36.  The plan was to replace all the floors and frames, then replace the planks.  At that point it would be hard to call it a restoration.  He did replace at least some of the floors and frames and then I never heard from him again.

I will be amazed and in awe of this kid if this boat is finished.

 

IStream

Super Anarchist
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I'd say he's probably heading for the nadir of the project in the next few months. Keel timber's gotta go, which is both a big unbudgeted expense and a psychological blow, with a few more months of shitty weather just to add insult to injury. If he can overcome this and is still at it this summer, he'll gain a lot of momentum and I'd give him good odds of finishing 12-18 months thereafter.

 

IStream

Super Anarchist
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Leo blew his budget on $6K worth of purpleheart. I just chipped in $40 as a bit of cold comfort. If you appreciate projects like this and old school craftsmanship, now would be a good time to act on it.

 

Rasputin22

Rasputin22
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Greenheart would have been just as good as Purpleheart at a fraction of the cost but I have no idea of the availability of either in the PNW. If you can get one, you can probably get the other from the same source.

     I knew a guy in the VI who wanted to build a replica of a 'revenue schooner'' and had the project done on the beach in Nevis. He sailed his boat down to Guiana and bought a suitable 45' long greenheart log and TOWED it back to the little native boatyard on the beach in Nevis. Greenheart barely floats.

 
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allene222

Super Anarchist
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SF Bay
My mast step and the floors under it are purple heart.  Really good strong rot resistant wood. I see it is more stable than greenheart.  That might be important for a keel.

 

Rasputin22

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Not sure where you get the 'more stable than greenheart' Allene. I have used both woods for a wide variety of projects from boat keels to furniture and doors and I have never seen anything check as bad as purpleheart in some raised panels for a batch of fancy entry doors for custom homes in the VI. Similar gates to the pool areas that weren't subjected to the uneven heating from tropic sun on one side and airconditioning on the other fared better. I ended up having to make separate inner and outer panels in the Purpleheart and assemble the panels floating in their frames with a layer of that Mylar/Aluminum bubble pack between the two layers to allow them to shrink and contract independently. The Lignum Vitae wood had long been harvested on St John, but you could occasionally find old fence posts from colonial days that were great for steps and gaff throats. Lignum is about as stable as Delrin, maybe more so! 

 

Rasputin22

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Rot Resistance: Purpleheart is rated as being very durable, and resists both decay and most insect attacks, though it has been reported to be susceptible to attack from marine borers.

Rot Resistance: Greenheart is rated as very durable, and is also resistant to most insect attacks. It’s also considered to be one of the best-suited woods for use in marine environments, and has good weathering characteristics.

What do you look at when you rate a wood as 'stable'?

I see the Greenheart shows more tangential shrinkage that Purpleheart but when you look at the T/R ratio the 1.1 of Greenheart would seem to me to be more stable overall than the Greenheart with a T/R ratio of 1.7. 

I'll take Greenheart for my keel or wormshoe anyday over Purpleheart despite the published values. 

 

allene222

Super Anarchist
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SF Bay
I really have no opinion on this. I know Steve used Purple heart for my boat and I read the quote below from the link I sent.  No opinion other than that. I did see the note about bores.  I had some bores on my boat once.  Cost me $100 to get rid of them. One of the least expensive haulouts I ever had.

Comments: Greenheart is perhaps the stiffest wood in the world, with an average modulus of elasticity of an astounding 3,716,000 lbf/in2! However, the wood also has a fairly high movement in service, and should not be used in situations where stability is critical.

Greenheart logs are reported to occasionally violently split apart upon sawing—sending pieces of the wood flying. As a result of this unusual characteristic, sawyers wrap chain around the sections of the log that have already been sawn.

 

Rasputin22

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But think about it. It's not how MUCH the wood shrinks - it's how symetric it shrinks. It's the RATIO of Tangential over Radial that'll tell you how symetric your wet turning will dry. All other things being equal, the wood with a T/R Ratio closest to 1 (Tangential and Radial equal) is less likely to crack when dry than a wood with a T/R Ratio of 2.7. It's good to try and work with the wood - but why try and work with wood that, by its nature, must work against you?

 

billy backstay

Backstay, never bought a suit, never went to Vegas
I have seen several projects this ambitious.  I just have never seen one finish.  People work for years and then just disappear.

There was one old wood boat rebuilt around here.  It was Freda, an 1885 32 foot yacht.  The rebuild took 8 years and cost $500,000.  It is the oldest sailing boat on the West Coast.

One of the unfinished projects was a boat like mine, an L-36.  The plan was to replace all the floors and frames, then replace the planks.  At that point it would be hard to call it a restoration.  He did replace at least some of the floors and frames and then I never heard from him again.

I will be amazed and in awe of this kid if this boat is finished.


Does this guy have a source of income, or is he being paid to do this, for someone else?  In the early '70's Mom and her partner in their yacht brokerage business hired a local shipwright to do a similar rebuild on a 45 foot Nova Scotian fishing schooner hull that was in similar condition.  Took years, but when complete, "Alicia", was a fine yacht and we took her to St. Margarets Bay in Nova Scotia and raced against the stripped out schooners up there.  Most of the competition had slim to no interiors, where as we had full on buildout with cabins and bunks, galley, tiny wood stove, head and foc'sl, and the rig was l modeled after the gaff rigged, topsail schooners of the period from Massachusetts.  It was a real treat to be involved with that in my teenaged years. 

 
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allene222

Super Anarchist
3,959
57
SF Bay
I really question his decision to replace the teak keel. But he would really need to set the boat back in the water to see if it would close up. And easy to second guess him from here. I will say he does seem to know what he is doing.  That joint work was impressive.

 
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