A big project!

t.rex

Member


EPISODE 128

It seems like Tally Ho may be nearly finished… but is she really? And when will she finally be re-launched?

In this episode we take a look at the work left to do, the steps left to take, the order of tasks, and the likely timeframe.

We also catch up with the progress over the last couple of weeks, with a lot of interior joinery, a sliding bunk mockup, drip-tray and sole board installation, and a mysterious teddy bear.
 

floater

Super Duper Anarchist
4,843
747
quivira regnum
yeah. I'm probably undercooking it. imagine hiring several expert artisans for years. and that doesn't include anything about the boat. tools. or the workshop.
- salaries.
- rents.
- tools.
- then start counting the materials and equipment for the boat itself.

when Leo said: "it's by no means a sure thing that Tally Ho will ever hit the water". he's not kidding.

the documentation he is doing of this project is pretty great. as it is such an anachronism.
 
Last edited:

billy backstay

Backstay, never bought a suit, never went to Vegas
yeah. I'm probably undercooking it. imagine hiring several expert artisans for years. and that doesn't include anything about the boat. tools. or the workshop.
- salaries.
- rents.
- tools.
- then start counting the materials and equipment for the boat itself.

when Leo said: "it's by no means a sure thing that Tally Ho will ever hit the water". he's not kidding.

the documentation he is doing of this project is pretty great. as it is such an anachronism.

Some of those tools look mighty expensive!!

.
 

floater

Super Duper Anarchist
4,843
747
quivira regnum
That project file gives me nightmares. Looks like some of the software projects I am involved with. :eek:
but the irony is that mismanagement in big projects often rewarded (more time = more money in the consultants pockets).

at least with a boat its all right there - in plain sight. and it would seem that Leo has done a remarkable job managing this project.
 

MauiPunter

Will sail for food
but the irony is that mismanagement in big projects often rewarded (more time = more money in the consultants pockets).

at least with a boat its all right there - in plain sight. and it would seem that Leo has done a remarkable job managing this project.
No doubt. He seems pretty efficient with his resources. I have no doubt this project will complete.
 

Foiling Optimist

Super Anarchist
1,188
291
Vancouver BC.
You can see the challenge. Steady progress begets steady Patreon income from videos and other forms of assistance, and weekly videos are important for the algorithm, so continued momentum is critical. But in order to keep progress going there must be cash outlays such as for the engine, tankage, $20K in teak, the water maker and all kinds of deck hardware. These have to arrive at the right time so the project doesn't stall. Meanwhile you're paying your crew and they need to constantly be working as well. It's like foiling on a surfboard where if you crash and fall in it's hard to restart. I completely believe Leo can do this, but for him this feel like the project management version of his first solo sail across the Atlantic.
 

Boathavn

Hof & Gammel Dansk - Skål !
1656922092427.png


I remember unloading salmon to the Western Flyer in Southeast when she was a tender for Whitney Fidalgo. Looking good after her Port Townsend Shipwrights restoration (video above).
 

accnick

Super Anarchist
2,776
1,892
I suspect it's, like, 3x that. My guess is $40k just for the cover boards (10 planks x 40 board feet each x $100/board-foot).
For a project like this, you are likely to be working with an agent or broker somewhere to buy large teak timbers in quantity, say a half-container load. In these circumstances, you are paying dramatically less than retail price.

I had a deal with an importer when I was building my last boat, where I would help unload and sort a containers of rough teak and mahogany in exchange for getting first pick, before even the high-end local builders got to it.

I was also buying in large enough quantities—this is typical with big dealers—that I got substantial break on price.

From what I can tell, Leo is nobody’s fool, and will leverage his high profile to the max.

I really admire what he has accomplished thus far, from somewhat naïve beginnings.
 

P_Wop

Super Anarchist
6,370
3,285
Bay Area, CA
I really hope and believe he's keeping all that "scrap" teak. It would be perfect for interior parts like grabrails or door trim, or just anything. And on deck, the deckhouses, cockpit, you name it. Even so, there will be loads left over. As previous posters have noted, that stuff is expensive!
 
Top