A-Cat tacking with central sheeting system

JMF

Member
54
0
France
Hi,

I moved recently to a central sheeting system, largely inspired from advices found here (http://forums.sailinganarchy.com/index.php?showtopic=111713).

But the best way to manage the mainsheet during tacking is not obvious to me, as I do not have any more a cleat to block the sheet during the movement (only a cleat on each side to manage the cuni and rotation).

Would some of you know about a link on the net that would demonstrate the adequate mouvement ? Or maybe one will be courageous enough to explain in plain text the key elements of the mouvement.

My issues:

- I can't reach the wire handle directly with the mainsheet in hand to go in the boat, so I take the sheet with the other hand (tiller), take the wire, switch the sheet again, go in the boat, and then the sheet gets too loose...

- in the middle of the tack, I drop the sheet on the tramp, while turning back to manage the tiller extension. Is it OK?

- to go out, I don't with which hand to take the sheet: difficult to hold it with the same hand as the wire handle, and then it is too short to go out...

Basic issues I imagine... But I would be happy to take good habits from the beginning.

Regards,

JMF

 
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Sailingkid

Super Anarchist
I'll try and explain what I do to see if it helps.

I wait right until I'm about to tack, had a look over my shoulder etc, then I put the mainsheet in my tiller hand, get into the boat on my knees, unhook with my front hand, start going across the boat. As I cross the old windward hiking strap I grab the mainsheet right at the block on the tramp which means I can pull on a couple of feet to power me up a bit more out of the tack, so generally the hulls just flying as I climb up to the new windward side. With the tiller extension just as my hand hits the mainsheet purchase on the traveller I throw the extension straight up, then swing my hand around the back and catch it as its falling, which is not too hard with a carbon extension but a bit tricky with an alloy one. Then at the end I swap hands as I sit down on the new windward side, hit the hiking strap to get moving, then hook on and put my front hand on the handle, then jump off the boat and hope I stay hooked on, then take the mainsheet off my tiller hand.

Hope this helps, Tom

 

SimonN

Super Anarchist
10,532
753
Sydney ex London
The video does a pretty good job of showing a tack. To make one clear. Do not drop the mainsheet. Note how as he comes in off the wire, Ben raises the hand holding the tiller and mainsheet. This has the effect of maintaining tension on the sheet until you grab the sheet with the other hand, close to the block on the tramp. Also note that when going out, you don't touch the handle. Simply hook on and sit back until your weight is taken on the trap and then push out with your legs. The other skill you need to master when doing this is to allow the sheet to slip through your hand under control. Sometimes you do it at the same rate as you are going out, sometimes less as you pull in mainsheet at the same time.

 

Sailingkid

Super Anarchist
The video does a pretty good job of showing a tack. To make one clear. Do not drop the mainsheet. Note how as he comes in off the wire, Ben raises the hand holding the tiller and mainsheet. This has the effect of maintaining tension on the sheet until you grab the sheet with the other hand, close to the block on the tramp. Also note that when going out, you don't touch the handle. Simply hook on and sit back until your weight is taken on the trap and then push out with your legs. The other skill you need to master when doing this is to allow the sheet to slip through your hand under control. Sometimes you do it at the same rate as you are going out, sometimes less as you pull in mainsheet at the same time.
I've always put my hand on the handle just in case something does go wrong and you come unhooked, you have at least some chance of not loosing the boat? Then you can just let your tiller hand slide out the extension with the mainsheet in it?

 

SimonN

Super Anarchist
10,532
753
Sydney ex London
The video does a pretty good job of showing a tack. To make one clear. Do not drop the mainsheet. Note how as he comes in off the wire, Ben raises the hand holding the tiller and mainsheet. This has the effect of maintaining tension on the sheet until you grab the sheet with the other hand, close to the block on the tramp. Also note that when going out, you don't touch the handle. Simply hook on and sit back until your weight is taken on the trap and then push out with your legs. The other skill you need to master when doing this is to allow the sheet to slip through your hand under control. Sometimes you do it at the same rate as you are going out, sometimes less as you pull in mainsheet at the same time.
I've always put my hand on the handle just in case something does go wrong and you come unhooked, you have at least some chance of not loosing the boat? Then you can just let your tiller hand slide out the extension with the mainsheet in it?
Everybody I have ever studied doesn't use the handle to go out. I know for sure that Glen and Stevie don't and as we see from the video, neither does Ben. If you are using a standard cat system, I would have thought using the handle increases the chances of coming unhooked. By hooking on and dropping your arse over the side until the system "bottoms out" and then kicking out with your legs, you are keeping tension on at all times and it simply cannot come out. I also note that you physically unhook. I don't use the conventional cat system (old skiff sailor!) but I believe that if it is set up correctly, when you come in the act of standing up unhooks you, which is another reason why using the handle could lead to coming unhooked. It's why you stand up and then kneel back down. Ben's certainly seems to work like that.

 

SCARECROW

Super Anarchist
6,000
688
Melbourne, Aus
Hate to say it Tom but I think he's right. If your trap is set for a flat trapezing height, grabbing the handle on the way out is as likely to cause you to come unhooked as it is to save your arse.

 

Sailingkid

Super Anarchist
I see what your all saying, I grab the handle and pull it sideways to keep the slack off the system just as I step off the boat. I don't go out on the handle 49er style then drop down, that's asking for trouble.

 

Lost in Translation

Super Anarchist
1,267
67
Atlanta, GA
I used to do the exact same sailing kid, but found as the others have that it is better to go out without the handle as you keep smooth control of the mainsheet and save a step or two. The foot strap technique is particularly good for going out downwind.

 

JMF

Member
54
0
France
Thanks to your advices, I tried the technique last Week-end.

So now, I understqnd what has to be done, and need a lot of practice.

Going out is OK. Bus going is still at high risk ;-) I looked again at the video, and I understand taht I have to come back on the tramp before really tacking. At the moment, getting on the knees, I already push too much the helm, and land with the boom in the face and 0.5s to unhook. I did not capsized, but it was not really safe.

Big thanks for the help.

Regards,

JMF

 

fresta

New member
Another good idea might be to visualize your tack, so you know how you tack and when you change hands. Forcing yourself to think through the whole tack insures that you do the same moves on each tacks (a lot of people tack differently depending on which tack they start on)

Since I am forced to live without my A 6 out of the 12 months i have used mental sailing a lot, it has helped me a lot and actually improved my boat handling although you also need to get in the water and do it in real life.

 

Dougy the gun

Member
96
0
Aus
Another good idea might be to visualize your tack, so you know how you tack and when you change hands. Forcing yourself to think through the whole tack insures that you do the same moves on each tacks (a lot of people tack differently depending on which tack they start on)

Since I am forced to live without my A 6 out of the 12 months i have used mental sailing a lot, it has helped me a lot and actually improved my boat handling although you also need to get in the water and do it in real life.
I visialze driving a f1 car all the time! When i get that shot im guna be a gun!!!
 
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SimonN

Super Anarchist
10,532
753
Sydney ex London
what do you mean that you're guna be a gun. You are already. A Legend in your own mind. Bet you couldn't get top 3 in any A class regatta or should that be not even top 10 in a 9 boat fleet. :p

 

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