A trimaran daysailer foraging boomers

cyclone

Super Anarchist
1,379
628
Maine
Thanks Cyclone, love it, it ticks almost all the boxes. I know I'll have to give in on the freestanding mast. Do you have more details on the plans, construction, etc? Are you located in Maine?
Yes, I’m in Maine. The CC 23 is a John Marples design. One was built at the WoodenBoat School in the early 90’s as part of a class given by Jim Brown on composite construction. I think Russell was there as well. I inherited the panel mold in disrepair many years later. John Marples’ Searunner site is still up and running and offering plans. I believe John is in Maine as well. 

https://www.searunner.com/index.php/cc23-tri

 

hobiedd97

Member
50
20
Virginia
A Marples CC 23 is currently for sale in Maryland on sailboatlistings.com.

I don't know anything else about it - not my boat, and I don't know the owner.

 

unShirley

Super Anarchist
1,678
262
Ventura
No love for the Weta? Clearly the reticence is indicating not but, please forgive an uninformed lurker and tell me why?

Title of thread is "for aging boomers" (even though OP forgot the space).  Aging boomers tend not to want to have lots of water splashing them while sailing.  OP also wanted a free standing mast.  Nothing wrong with weta, nice little boat but not for your average 65+ year old guy/gal who is more interested in less spill and thrill but remains willing to assert mastery over wind and waves with the appropriate vehicle.
Hey, I am 65+ and love my Weta precisely because it is very thrilling, especially 3 sail sailing downwind in strong winds and big seas.  And, one gets the thrill without trapezing.  In fact, I find the Weta to be very comfortable and ergonomic for a small boat.  The most thrilling boats are gonna be wet.  But, I suspect there is no love for the Weta in this thread because it is strictly a single hander.  Weta performance suffers greatly if you load it up with people or any other source of extra weight.

 

RedTuna

Super Anarchist
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Hey, I am 65+ and love my Weta precisely because it is very thrilling, especially 3 sail sailing downwind in strong winds and big seas.  And, one gets the thrill without trapezing.  In fact, I find the Weta to be very comfortable and ergonomic for a small boat.  The most thrilling boats are gonna be wet.  But, I suspect there is no love for the Weta in this thread because it is strictly a single hander.  Weta performance suffers greatly if you load it up with people or any other source of extra weight.
The Weta is a gateway boat.  Yeah, yeah, comfy, fast and stable.  But I put my SO on it for a race and she whined about how slow we were compared to the single handers.  And I of course couldn't say we were slower because of her 105 pounds of extra weight.  So I bought a Sprint 750 and she loved it.  Chain reaction, though, hence the gateway boat.  I think every other Weta sailor within 100 miles of me ended up with a Corsair within a year or so.

 

MultiThom

Super Anarchist
1,695
368
Benicia, CA
The Weta is a gateway boat.  Yeah, yeah, comfy, fast and stable.  
Comfy?  I don't find it comfy to be firehosed with high pressure 50 degree water.  Exhilarating maybe, but not comfy.  But it points out the basic question...why do you sail?  It's been on my mind the past 3 months or so since I seem to have lost the "jones" for sailing.  Partly it is covid messing with my head, but mostly I think it is 71 and feeling less adventurous.  Too much of "been there, done that, got the t-shirt".  

 
A

Amati

Guest
Yes, you will get wet on a Weta but for its size it is really well done and can handle itself in a wide range of conditions. To me the drawback to the F-boats is their size and weight when out of the water.  Same thing for my L7, once sailing it's easy peezy but moving it around on land and at the dock by myself is a beatdown. How bout the Pulse?  I've heard it isn't super fast but it would seem to meet the parameters pretty well.  
Ran across this thread again whilst on the elliptical-  you could ditch the center hull & turn the L7 into a catamaran,  with a lighter (Hobie 21 was it?) mast- figure out a central spine to house the sliding beams & other stuff, folded it might get close enough to 8 feet beam, keep the mast step at the same level as the hulls?  With 14-16 beam, might be fun.  I’ll post a pic of the general idea-

DB56575D-66D3-41E4-A587-48A2E1CC2085.jpeg

 
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Tom Kirkman

Anarchist
The Weta is a gateway boat.  Yeah, yeah, comfy, fast and stable.  But I put my SO on it for a race and she whined about how slow we were compared to the single handers.  And I of course couldn't say we were slower because of her 105 pounds of extra weight.  So I bought a Sprint 750 and she loved it.  Chain reaction, though, hence the gateway boat.  I think every other Weta sailor within 100 miles of me ended up with a Corsair within a year or so.
I don't doubt it, but what I can't figure out is how anyone in the market for a boat could be that far off the mark to begin with. A Weta and a Sprint 750 aren't even remotely similar, other than having 3 hulls. How did someone that would be happier with a 750 even consider a Weta at the outset? Or did the Weta get them hooked and then moving on to a larger boat?

 

unShirley

Super Anarchist
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262
Ventura
RedTuna made a valid argument that the Weta is a "gateway boat."  True, but for me, an aging boomer, the gate has swung the opposite way.  I have done and continue to be an OPB racer on various bigger boats, both multihull and monohull.   But, I can't afford any of those boats.  Although the initial cost of the Weta is significantly more than a used beach cat, it is an easy, simple and affordable way to have some thrilling sailing on my own boat, whenever I want (and the weather cooperates, which, fortunately, around here, is often).  I keep mine assembled, near the ramp, so it is very easy to go for a sail spontaneously.  Yes, I am an OPB racer, but a Weta daysailer. And, a few times a year, I am actually able to race the Weta.

 
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mundt

Anarchist
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Amati, that's a pretty interesting idea.  There's a slightly busted up L7 for sale cheap right now.  Somebody with a little skill could make a nice cat outta it or just fix it and have a great tri.  I've sailed a few times on a Woods cat that uses the same mast and sails as the L7.  The hulls are much heavier than the L7 amas but the boat sails very well.  I think a 12ish foot beam would be fine for your proposed cat. 

 
A

Amati

Guest
Amati, that's a pretty interesting idea.  There's a slightly busted up L7 for sale cheap right now.  Somebody with a little skill could make a nice cat outta it or just fix it and have a great tri.  I've sailed a few times on a Woods cat that uses the same mast and sails as the L7.  The hulls are much heavier than the L7 amas but the boat sails very well.  I think a 12ish foot beam would be fine for your proposed cat. 
Would the mast section tolerate the increased compression of reduced beam?  

 
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Amati

Guest
Comfy?  I don't find it comfy to be firehosed with high pressure 50 degree water.  Exhilarating maybe, but not comfy.  But it points out the basic question...why do you sail?  It's been on my mind the past 3 months or so since I seem to have lost the "jones" for sailing.  Partly it is covid messing with my head, but mostly I think it is 71 and feeling less adventurous.  Too much of "been there, done that, got the t-shirt".  
I’m hitting the 7-oh next year, and wondering the same.  Gotta get the K1 out and see if the stoke is still there, but next spring- fucking construction at the house…. And maybe COVID not be hanging over us so much.  Wearing a mask working on the boat at the marina sucks…

 

Vincent DePillis

Super Anarchist
1,078
13
Seattle
Gonna be 65 next month.  Sail anF31r in the Salish Sea.  Been thinking a lot about to NOT lose the love for for sailing.  How to adapt my boat and ambitions to my lesser strength and increased caution.

  It's gonna take a while in part because of the ingrained go-fast habits.  For instance, this summer I did a bit of a deep dive on installing a roller furling jib.  Ended up not pulling the trigger because I could not quite handle paying all that money and getting a much heavier set up with a whole lot less sail area.  So not I am working on optimizing a jib downhaul set up.  

 

RedTuna

Super Anarchist
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Texas
I don't doubt it, but what I can't figure out is how anyone in the market for a boat could be that far off the mark to begin with. A Weta and a Sprint 750 aren't even remotely similar, other than having 3 hulls. How did someone that would be happier with a 750 even consider a Weta at the outset? Or did the Weta get them hooked and then moving on to a larger boat?
I used the term as a joke.  Kinda.  I think pretty much everyone had owned multiple boats before.  It seemed to be a cascade or domino effect once people sailed a Sprint or Dash.  And I think SOs, potential SOs, and having children played some role.

 

Bruno

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My boat came with a roller furler, the partially furled sail is ok for reaching, not much else.  It is a lot of weight high up, and windage, it is a hassle bringing the jib up and down, better now with lifelines and nets. I'd prefer a tradtional setup but it takes some money and time to convert. Piece by piece, first a good inner jib. A deck bag makes a lot of sense.

 

MultiThom

Super Anarchist
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Benicia, CA
  It's gonna take a while in part because of the ingrained go-fast habits.  For instance, this summer I did a bit of a deep dive on installing a roller furling jib.  Ended up not pulling the trigger because I could not quite handle paying all that money and getting a much heavier set up with a whole lot less sail area.  So not I am working on optimizing a jib downhaul set up.  
A 31 is a big boat with big sails.  As long as you have crew to do the hard stuff (like short tacking against a current), shouldn't have to worry about losing your sailing jones as you age some more.  Since i single hand mostly, I've always preferred a roller furling jib and now, I especially enjoy the ease of a self tacking jib.  As an aside, though, if you change the jib (move hounds up) to start at the screacher halyard exit, you might not sacrifice too much power switching to a roller furled self tacker.  

 

kleppar

Member
72
20
Norway
I am having Mike Waters´ W17 built in Norway, with some matching criteria (except for free standing mast). It is fast, dry, light and comfortable. 

See information here:

https://smalltridesign.com/index.html

and on my website:

https://www.segling.info/w17-english

W17 for crusing: https://www.segling.info/w17-for-cruising

Trimaran sailing at comfort: https://www.segling.info/lopper-i-blodet

Here is a comparison of trimarans: https://www.segling.info/comparison

I wanted a beachable trimaran for short day trips, and quickly ruled out forward facing kayak types, as well as those with no cockpit, and just a platform or a trampoline. My W17 is the first with swing arm folding (not the standard on top folding).

 
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MultiThom

Super Anarchist
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Benicia, CA
Here is a comparison of trimarans: https://www.segling.info/comparison

I wanted a beachable trimaran for short day trips, and quickly ruled out forward facing kayak types, as well as those with no cockpit, and just a platform or a trampoline. My W17 is the first with swing arm folding (not the standard on top folding).
Nice comparison.  Missing a couple like the Sardines, but laudable to putting them altogether.  I'd also change the performance index to something more like Texel or AUS ratings.  L**0.3 times SA**(0.4) divided by Weight**(0.325)...not that either are actually very accurate in describing performance.  Good luck with the W17.  Hope the weight is beach do'able for you.  

 

MultiThom

Super Anarchist
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368
Benicia, CA
That satisfies the OP request for a self standing rig.  The addition of the Ljungstrom rig (double mainsails) would make it easy to go downwind sans spinnaker.  Not sure why the mizzen is needed, but it is cool looking with the wishboom.  Certainly would get folks to stare as you sail along with those Newick lines.  Personally (I'm an aging boomer), prefers a boat with a spinnaker since, "by golly", I spent years learning how to sail with one and don't want to admit I'm too old to play with it :)    

 
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