A trimaran daysailer foraging boomers

Fat Point Jack

Super Anarchist
2,225
297
I've got 35 years in, I know my limits.

She told me a few years later that she decided to marry me when we were putting up the Hobie mast and she dropped the pin and I did not yell.

 
A

Amati

Guest
Gonna be 65 next month.  Sail anF31r in the Salish Sea.  Been thinking a lot about to NOT lose the love for for sailing.  How to adapt my boat and ambitions to my lesser strength and increased caution.

  It's gonna take a while in part because of the ingrained go-fast habits.  For instance, this summer I did a bit of a deep dive on installing a roller furling jib.  Ended up not pulling the trigger because I could not quite handle paying all that money and getting a much heavier set up with a whole lot less sail area.  So not I am working on optimizing a jib downhaul set up.  
A cruise-ish version of a Marstrom / A class ish thing begins to appeal- a drifter for the light (when it’s easy to handle), then one sail.  Comfy seats, hard decks, mast step at deck level so stepping is easy, hulls big enough for a port a potty, fold down central Bimini for a place to crawl into and take a nap.  Sleek enough to appeal. This apparent idea that older guys need clunky boats is offensive. I think most foraging boomers are looking for a satisfying, responsive boat without the pucker factor.  
 

Back to frankenboating.

 
Last edited:
A

Amati

Guest
Not a boomer but did allot of research and instead of just another Getaway on the bay I finalized down to 2 boats here in Hawaii that dont exist, Diam 24 and any of the Astus's.  Which in the case of single handling in good wind and the fact it can be broken down reasonably and budget it was the 16.5 that was chosen.  But man did the pandemic make me pay!!  Freight was insane not to mention Brandon's personal demuraging  fines at the port of LA. nearly doubled the entire cost to get it here and well its here and some day I'm gonna be a boomer with a boomin ass little bay sprayer!!

View attachment 479947
It was a problem before SARS 2.   Unless you can piggyback with other boats, the co$ts add up, especially with new boats.  I couldn’t piggyback, and the cost went up for an English dinghy. IIRR, the boat before fees and shipping was somewhere around 10-11K, pickup price was 17+K, RORO.  An argument for made locally, you’d think, but perhaps not.  Or maybe designing to the tech in your area.  Wasn’t there a movement towards dinghy design digitally exported to CNC cut out kits locally, even dedicated fabrication of said kits locally, so shipping (or much shipping) wouldn’t be necessary?  I suppose it limits materials, but (and I’m going to regret posting this), but sophisticated wood tech would be at least green, & getting over the religion of centralized manufacture might be a good idea in an ongoing COVID world.  Look at Julian’s 89er project & the number of people involved, for example.

edit- it’s not new, in a general way. Steinway, before WW2 had multiple builders around the world.

 
Last edited:

Windartist

New member
Just happened upon this thread because I’m facing a similar dilemma and was doing a search for a psychologist specializing in sailboat optimization for aging boomers. The only sailboat I’ve had is a Windrider 17 and I’ve really enjoyed it for the past ten years. I’m not a pro, just like to get out with my wife and sail around on the Indian and St Lucie Rivers in Florida for 2-3 hours on a nice day, have lunch sail slowly by the shore and look at the houses and go fast when the conditions are right. BUT, I have voices that tell me that I should get a little bigger boat and sail a little further and look good doing it. I’m just about to get an F24 but I really like steering with my feet and having all the ropes right there and handy. My wife isn’t much help. This seems silly as I’m happy with the Windrider but I feel that I should try something new. This thread hasn’t helped silence the voices in my head however a new, sleek 22’ Windrider might fit the bill.

 

craigiri

Super Anarchist
8,434
143
Sarasota - W. MA.
I am amazed that there aren't more threads here on the newer cats that are super-lightweight (read that - blow up!) - it seems like they have come a LONG way, and some are claimed to be the "baby boomers" answer.

Maybe someone - who knows these (is the Red Beard Guy here?) can start a thread on them.

On the same basic subject, it would be great to have a top level thread either in Dinghy or in the main sailing forum on all boats with are either < 100 lbs (hull) or in pieces that allow easy assembly in a few minutes.

Some of these boats look mighty nice....definitely have improved.

https://redbeardsailing.com

Some instantly convert to rowing or small electric motors for a "deck" boat type of ride for a couple (or three) adults and/or the kids. 

In the monohulls I know of Rocket, Aero, Minifish...all well less than 100 lbs. Reverso...Air is a racing type Dinghy in sections.

For the aging sailor - also, for the "don't want hassle" sailor, these would seem to be important metrics. 

Although they are not sold here in any numbers, the French 20 foot tricat really does look like the answer (on mooring, on beach or mast-up) to some of the Baby Boomers wants. 

Yet there is only one years-old mention of these on MA. 
I'm not gonna start the threads since I know nothing - but someone should!

https://www.trimaran-tricat.com/en/le-tricat-20/

 

MultiThom

Super Anarchist
1,693
366
Benicia, CA
Don't think those inflatables meet any needs for aging boomers.  Lets list the design criteria for an older person...

1.  Have money, but won't waste it on expensive toys.

2.  Not as much strength as used to have, but still have skills for wind and wave.  Boomers who haven't sailed before are not likely to want a boat now.

3.  Like our comforts, so a wet boat is not of interest.

4.  Don't want crew since we have all sorts of time while crew probably still has to work for a living.

5.  Since this is multihull anarchy, probably want to sail reasonably fast.  Unlikely to brave above 20 kts nor have interest in sailing in less than 8 kts of wind.  

6.  You do have to get back to where you started, so has to be able to sail to weather reasonably well.

For me, SeaRail 19 fit the bill.  As an added bonus for the SeaRail, it has self tacking jib (see #2 above) and no boom (so no head thumping).  I suspect a Pulse, Astus, Sardine, W17, SeaPearl yadda yadda other small trimaran would be just as nice.  I omit Weta (see #3), WIndrider (see #6), F22 (See #1), Libertist (see #1).  

 

Crump's Brother

Anarchist
809
107
C.TEX.USA
May I present my Searail beachable beach creeper;

Paddle boards for kids and wife..

Cooler with cold drinks & snacks..

Motor if wind dies..

Pad for my butt.

Cuddy cabin for paddles, dog and other stuff while under sail. IMG_20220516_111745_829.jpg

 

Billy Bob

Member
487
50
New Zealand
Did the sting 600's/adventure tri ever make it to the water? Nothing shows on their website
except for 1 sail in lighter winds. The boat looked pretty frail at the cross beams.
The Searail 19 looks like a practical vessel for a lot of us Foragers.
I sold my NACRA 36 and I am looking to downsize to a small tri (19 to 24ft)
for local club racing in New Zealand. There is not a lot to chose from here in the way of
used or new small fast tris. Except for building from new.
 

plywoodboy

Super Anarchist
1,025
126
Brisbane
Did the sting 600's/adventure tri ever make it to the water? Nothing shows on their website
except for 1 sail in lighter winds. The boat looked pretty frail at the cross beams.
The Searail 19 looks like a practical vessel for a lot of us Foragers.
I sold my NACRA 36 and I am looking to downsize to a small tri (19 to 24ft)
for local club racing in New Zealand. There is not a lot to chose from here in the way of
used or new small fast tris. Except for building from new.
You've got one of the best ever designed right there in your patch.

 

MultiThom

Super Anarchist
1,693
366
Benicia, CA
There is little doubt that the F22r is the class of the small tri genre. But it is awfully expensive which is the same complaint I had for a Pulse and which is why l use a SeaRail for my joyrides. As the OP said in his original posts, seems a shame more production small tris don't make it to market or stay in production (exceptions being Weta and Hobie AI/TI). There is a market but I suspect it is too small given how many small monohull sportboats will scratch nearly the same itch.
 

munt

Super Anarchist
1,116
136
The belt
Correct me if I'm wrong but that appears to be about 57k US dollars. Seems like a very nice boat but that's a lot of money or am I wrong? I know the Pulse hasn't gotten a lot of love but why not? How bout an Astus?
 

Billy Bob

Member
487
50
New Zealand
Wow only $90,000.00 for a F22? I am not saying the seller doesn't have that into it but it seems pretty expensive for a 22 ft used boat!
The adventure strike 600 looked good on the trailer and for one light air sail but when the rubber hit the road nearly crickets. Foiling or not I haven't heard of the boat setting the world on fire with it's performance. Any new news in the last two years? Seems they were on the right track initially with a kitset.
As far as a small racing\joy riding tri goes (19 to 24ft) affordable and fast seems like there are few in this category being talked about. I have been looking very seriously at building a TC627 By Tim Clissold yacht design. This design tics most of my boxes and I need to go FAST and be relatively comfortable sailing. I don't need accommodations but a little storage would be nice. I'm an aging boomer at 67. The cost to build in New Zealand dollars is about $40,000.00 in materials only. This would be complete with everything including trailer. While I have confidence to build one myself I'm still looking for an elusive silver bullet in availability, affordability and performance. I know you can't have all three but 2 out of 3?
Corsair pulse 600
Searail 19
Diam 24
Multi23
Am I missing some others in this size range that are considered good strong, fast racing day sailors?
 

MultiThom

Super Anarchist
1,693
366
Benicia, CA
I think a lot of Frankentri's exist because production tris are in short supply but light monohull boats (from canoes and kayaks and centerboard boats) and catamarans abound in the secondary market. It always seems an easy "project" until you actually start :)
 

munt

Super Anarchist
1,116
136
The belt
Out of Mr. Bob's list I'd bet the Diam be fastest, then M23. Those 2 might sometimes, somewhat satisfy your speed itch. A good, used M23 should be affordable and good bang for buck.
 
Top