Actual Selling Prices...

Israel Hands

Super Anarchist
3,196
1,884
coastal NC
Specifically, who has access to that data?  Is it only brokers?  I have an interest in a specific model, and only a handful of them have sold in the past few years.  I'd really like to know what the actual selling prices have been before I consider an offer number.

 

accnick

Super Anarchist
3,557
2,559
Specifically, who has access to that data?  Is it only brokers?  I have an interest in a specific model, and only a handful of them have sold in the past few years.  I'd really like to know what the actual selling prices have been before I consider an offer number.
The market changes rapidly these days, and historical data may be of little value, especially when only a few boats of a particular model have sold. If a boat has been on the market for more than two months or so, you can guarantee it is over-priced.

Using your own judgment and the survey, estimate what you are going to have to put into the boat, and adjust your offer accordingly.

All they can do is say "no". 

This is why you use a broker, rather than dealing face to face with a seller. The seller wants the most he can get, but the broker makes nothing if the boat doesn't sell.

I don't know how you access recent sales data. It's not like real estate sales, which are part of the public record where I live.

 

Israel Hands

Super Anarchist
3,196
1,884
coastal NC
and historical data may be of little value
Understood. It still can be of value in a negotiation, the way I see it, if it works to bring the number down to establish a widely different number as a 'reality point' against a high asking price. The offeree can certainly disregard past selling prices, but if I have that information to present, it can serve to anchor a lower end from which to negotiate. You make a good point about the broker's motivation helping to close a deal.  The question is, does it outweigh the roughly $10K in additional cost, in terms of working out a price that closes the sale?  The answer probably is "your situation may vary..."

 

accnick

Super Anarchist
3,557
2,559
Understood. It still can be of value in a negotiation, the way I see it, if it works to bring the number down to establish a widely different number as a 'reality point' against a high asking price. The offeree can certainly disregard past selling prices, but if I have that information to present, it can serve to anchor a lower end from which to negotiate. You make a good point about the broker's motivation helping to close a deal.  The question is, does it outweigh the roughly $10K in additional cost, in terms of working out a price that closes the sale?  The answer probably is "your situation may vary..."
I don't know what yacht broker commissions are these days. They used to be 10%.

Suppose they are asking $100,000 for a boat. Commission would be $10k.

Suppose the offer is $90k. Commission is $9k. The broker is going to try to make it happen, since $9k is better than 0 if the buyer walks.

I've even had brokers cut commissions to close a deal, if they really want to make it happen.

 

MauiPunter

Will sail for food
Specifically, who has access to that data?  Is it only brokers?  I have an interest in a specific model, and only a handful of them have sold in the past few years.  I'd really like to know what the actual selling prices have been before I consider an offer number.
Ask your broker.  Mine always told me ALL the prices of every sold boat of my kind before I made an offer to buy.  Your broker will have access to the goods.  Mine sent a spreadsheet.

 

SemiSalt

Super Anarchist
7,819
299
WLIS
I was walking around the marina, and noted a Capri 26 with  For Sale sign with a price of $12.5K. (If the Chinese rocket had fallen on my present boat, I would have been interested.) I looked on YW for "comparables" and the only Capri 26 was listed for something like twice that. 

Even in a widely fluctuating market, actual transaction prices are a more reliable guide than pipe dreams.

 

ENC_sailor

New member
1
0
Purchased a 1993 Capri 26 for $12k, that included a custom lift-off trailer. Research on the boat revealed comps are selling for $9-12k, and tandem axle trailers $2-3k.

Compared to boats of the same size and vintage, the Capri stands out for a number of reasons: modern hull design, wing keel, open cabin, enclosed head, large cockpit, wide side decks, walkthrough transom, Edson pedestal with autopilot, inboard diesel, great engine access, roller furler, cabin top traveler, (4) self-tailing winches, and a simple rig.
 
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Alaris

Super Anarchist
1,873
694
Annapolis
Ask your broker. Mine always told me ALL the prices of every sold boat of my kind before I made an offer to buy. Your broker will have access to the goods. Mine sent a spreadsheet.
This is the answer. My broker sent me all solids of the brand I was looking for within the last 3-4 years.
 


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