Air Force Pilot Screws Up - Wrong Airport

RedTuna

Super Anarchist
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You sure? there was a fire truck with Tampa International Airport on the side of it in the video... Knight would make more sense, since the runways are oriented more similarly to McDill... They each have a "22"
Kinda sure.  I used to TDY into Tampa Int'l periodically.  I have no memory of the backgrounds in the video, but it's been ages.

That’s my baby!  Spent 10 years on the program. Fun times. 
 

And it’s an amazingly capable craft. They once put an Orca in the trunk and flew to a beach on an Icelandic fiord. Got the fish to the water but found a boulder with a main gear. No prob, we shipped them a new one and our RAMS team installed it on the beach.  All in a days work.  
You worked the program?  Cool.  Wondering if maybe we ever met in the late 80s, early 90s.  I was an engine test cell weenie and helped bed down the first a/c at Charleston.  I remember being in the mock-up a/c in Long Beach while the first five a/c were already in production and wondering WTF.  I think it was the industry's first try at concurrent engineering and it wasn't going well.  Always on the verge of cancellation.  Behind schedule, over budget, over weight, under range and under powered.  Very gratifying to see it not only survive but become an exceptional airplane.

 

pbd

Super Anarchist
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Ca
Kinda sure.  I used to TDY into Tampa Int'l periodically.  I have no memory of the backgrounds in the video, but it's been ages.

You worked the program?  Cool.  Wondering if maybe we ever met in the late 80s, early 90s.  I was an engine test cell weenie and helped bed down the first a/c at Charleston.  I remember being in the mock-up a/c in Long Beach while the first five a/c were already in production and wondering WTF.  I think it was the industry's first try at concurrent engineering and it wasn't going well.  Always on the verge of cancellation.  Behind schedule, over budget, over weight, under range and under powered.  Very gratifying to see it not only survive but become an exceptional airplane.
Such is the life of most, if not all, military procurements.  The system has fundamental flaws.

The C-17, coupled with the A-12 fighter damn near bankrupted McDonnell Douglas.  The company was within days (hours?) of filing.  

 

Charlie Foxtrot

Super Anarchist
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Kinda sure.  I used to TDY into Tampa Int'l periodically.  I have no memory of the backgrounds in the video, but it's been ages.

You worked the program?  Cool.  Wondering if maybe we ever met in the late 80s, early 90s.  I was an engine test cell weenie and helped bed down the first a/c at Charleston.  I remember being in the mock-up a/c in Long Beach while the first five a/c were already in production and wondering WTF.  I think it was the industry's first try at concurrent engineering and it wasn't going well.  Always on the verge of cancellation.  Behind schedule, over budget, over weight, under range and under powered.  Very gratifying to see it not only survive but become an exceptional airplane.
I was part of the “50 That Saved the Program” when McD Program and AF SPO management hated each other so heartily in the early 90s. I worked mainly with company management and the SPO. But, I liked going down to the floor or over to the fuse and wing mock-ups. Kick the tires and see what my work was making possible. Got chased off of the “Hanging Garden” assembly tooling.
 

Fun times - kinda felt like SpaceX’s battle rhythm with all we were doing so fast.  
 

I’ll tip a glass of Highland Scotch to the best damn airlifter and all of us that breathed life into her!

 

RedTuna

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I’ll tip a glass of Highland Scotch to the best damn airlifter and all of us that breathed life into her!
I'll drink to that and add, "If it's too big, too heavy or has to go too far, put it on a C-5." 

I love all the heavies, even the rarely praised flying sippy cups that make global reach possible.

 

Bugsy

Super Anarchist
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There is a famous expression about pilots landing at the wrong airport.  Something like "the pilot had never previously landed at XX airport..... and still hasn't".

 

billy backstay

Backstay, never bought a suit, never went to Vegas
There is a famous expression about pilots landing at the wrong airport.  Something like "the pilot had never previously landed at XX airport..... and still hasn't".


There is an old but great joke about an irritable German Air Traffic Controller giving a British Airways pilot a hard time, and asking him if this was his first time flying to Berlin?  Pilot replies, "No Sir, I was here back in 1944, but we didn't land"....

 
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Charlie Foxtrot

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I'll drink to that and add, "If it's too big, too heavy or has to go too far, put it on a C-5." 

I love all the heavies, even the rarely praised flying sippy cups that make global reach possible.
Actually, you’ll need to put it on two FREDs, the C-5’s dispatch reliability is so poor.  
 

 But, I might be biased.  

 

IStream

Super Anarchist
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I thought the C-5M program addressed most of the reliability issues, but I could be wrong.

 

mikewof

mikewof
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I'll drink to that and add, "If it's too big, too heavy or has to go too far, put it on a C-5." 

I love all the heavies, even the rarely praised flying sippy cups that make global reach possible.
How do they get something that ginormous to become airborne in such a short takeoff distance? Do they exploit ground effects somehow?

I have to admit, landing that behemoth at a small field like that, and then taking off again like it's nothing, is a danged effective bit of public relations to the value of our tax dollars for that one particular plane.  Even if the future of warfare is economic, an airplane with that ability could have a million humanitarian uses.

 
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El Borracho

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How do they get something that ginormous to become airborne in such a short takeoff distance? Do they exploit ground effects somehow?
A huge wing are and the power to push it thru the air. A quick Google reveals it can takeoff from a 3000 foot runway with considerable fuel and cargo. Unload everything including the drinking water then wait for a 25 kn headwind and it can depart from farm fields. Certainly ground effect helps. 

Saw a demo at an airshow. Must have been absolutely minimum weight. Appeared to roll about its own length before rotation. Nuts.

 

Ed Lada

Super Anarchist
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A huge wing are and the power to push it thru the air. A quick Google reveals it can takeoff from a 3000 foot runway with considerable fuel and cargo. Unload everything including the drinking water then wait for a 25 kn headwind and it can depart from farm fields. Certainly ground effect helps. 

Saw a demo at an airshow. Must have been absolutely minimum weight. Appeared to roll about its own length before rotation. Nuts.
It was designed to carry maximum cargo on unimproved and small airfields, a job relegated to C-130s mostly.  It does that well.  Comparing it to a C5 which was designed to carry the highest possible payload, like some do above, is like comparing a Jeep to an Escalade. 

 

mikewof

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IIRC, a kind of blown flaps via the engines exhausts. Normally, flaps have gaps at the engines, not the C17
So it's using the jet exhaust to add turbulence and lift into the ground effect?

Cripes, whoever thought of that at Boeing was a mad genius.

 
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