All things Class40

huey 2

Super Anarchist
4,594
2,682
syd
Great Image

image.png

 

furler49

Member
251
205
Worldwide
I cannot wait for this class in the Route du Rhum and then around the world! 
 

Lalou Multi launched their Lombard design tonight. I appreciate the picture quality is pretty shit!

BDBEEF9D-20FD-4A39-9271-6D8CBD162783.png

 

Vincent DePillis

Super Anarchist
1,085
14
Seattle
Questions for the aficianados--   What's the current thinking on the jibs?  Looks like they are furling, on structural furlers with fiber forstays.  

Are they lashing at the top?  Using a halyard that runs in a zipper luff?  Using the karver system with a hook mounted on the swivel?

And for the jib itself,  are people using "structured luff" designs that share the load with the forestay?

If anyone is doing a dock walk and can take pix of these kind of rigging details, it would be really great to see.  I find these boats really fascinating.  With so many boats in a somewhat "affordable" class, i'm sure that there is quite a bit of innovation tht will transfer well to us plebes. 

 
Questions for the aficianados--   What's the current thinking on the jibs?  Looks like they are furling, on structural furlers with fiber forstays.  

Are they lashing at the top?  Using a halyard that runs in a zipper luff?  Using the karver system with a hook mounted on the swivel?

And for the jib itself,  are people using "structured luff" designs that share the load with the forestay?

If anyone is doing a dock walk and can take pix of these kind of rigging details, it would be really great to see.  I find these boats really fascinating.  With so many boats in a somewhat "affordable" class, i'm sure that there is quite a bit of innovation tht will transfer well to us plebes. 
Most Solents/J1s are lashed in place and have a zipper around the forestay.  The forestays are incorporated into a structural furler with a swivel at the top.   The J1 is not allowed a structural luff.  Proper luff tension can be a challenge.  I believe that a few of the newer boats may have dual set-ups that allow for hanks with a halyard hoist for one set-up or lashing for a different set up.  

The staysail/J2 and storm jib/J3 have various setups, but now that additional hooks/locks are allowed (since around 2018 or so), many are furling on cables that use halyard locks.

 

Cats Rule

Anarchist
Questions for the aficianados--   What's the current thinking on the jibs?  Looks like they are furling, on structural furlers with fiber forstays.  

Are they lashing at the top?  Using a halyard that runs in a zipper luff?  Using the karver system with a hook mounted on the swivel?

And for the jib itself,  are people using "structured luff" designs that share the load with the forestay?

If anyone is doing a dock walk and can take pix of these kind of rigging details, it would be really great to see.  I find these boats really fascinating.  With so many boats in a somewhat "affordable" class, i'm sure that there is quite a bit of innovation tht will transfer well to us plebes. 
There are a mixture, a majority of boats are running furled J1's lashed onto a structual stay, but there some boats running hank on J1's so they can be stacked when not in use 

 

Vincent DePillis

Super Anarchist
1,085
14
Seattle
There are a mixture, a majority of boats are running furled J1's lashed onto a structual stay, but there some boats running hank on J1's so they can be stacked when not in use 
I am planning on something similar to this (structural furler, perhaps lashed head).  As someone pointed out above, Proper luff tension will be an issue.  Any advice about how to tension the luff?  Assume that the jib will have a Load sharing luff-- with up to 50% of the total forestay load being borne by the luff of the sail.  

I am thinking that you would want to try to have a 4:1 tackle of some kind, but it has to be super compact, so that it would roll up inside the furled sail without making a huge lump.  I am thinking very small low friction rings webbed on to the sail?  maybe a special spool shaped pin/cleat at the connection of the furler to the sail?

 

nogetwe

Member
177
75
I am planning on something similar to this (structural furler, perhaps lashed head).  As someone pointed out above, Proper luff tension will be an issue.  Any advice about how to tension the luff?  Assume that the jib will have a Load sharing luff-- with up to 50% of the total forestay load being borne by the luff of the sail.  

I am thinking that you would want to try to have a 4:1 tackle of some kind, but it has to be super compact, so that it would roll up inside the furled sail without making a huge lump.  I am thinking very small low friction rings webbed on to the sail?  maybe a special spool shaped pin/cleat at the connection of the furler to the sail?
We asked for a cunningham attachment point in the jib for this purpose. Run the line from slightly above deck down through some sort of fairlead or small block at the tack and put the purchase on deck or even run the line aft to the 'piano'.

 
Last edited by a moderator:

Greyhound37

Super Anarchist
1,206
137
Annapolis
Pantaenius closed in US I am told by my ins broker


Thank you for your interest in our services. Please note, that Pantaenius America Ltd. does currently not offer new insurance policies for US resident owners and/or US flagged yachts. Pantaenius subsidiaries continue to operate in Australia, Austria, Denmark, Germany, Monaco, Norway, Poland, Spain, Sweden and the United Kingdom.

 
Last edited by a moderator:

Revboat

New member
39
80
Honolulu
Have there been any documented home builds of Class 40s? Or does anyone have any links or boat names for amateur builds? Just curious if anyone has taken on such a big project in their backyard or if it’s just too complex to do well.
I'm currently building one in an improvised boatyard in the Dominican Republic.  Hoping for a spring launch... but much to figure out as we go.  

C40Lam.jpg

 

Revboat

New member
39
80
Honolulu
No.  It's an original design.  The lines were drawn by Yves-Marie Tanton, a contributor on this forum.  He has posted some renderings above, although the design has changed in execution, as custom builds often do.  But it's his latest scow-bow hull design.  

We used male molds we built with a combination of carefully weighed hand-layup plus vacuum curing.   Labor intensive, but you get a very precise construction without the added costs of fabricating female molds. 

The scantlings, layout, sail plan, foil attachments, etc, etc. have been developed by a small working group that calls itself Offshore Garage -- i.e., "garage built" projects.

The whole idea is to try to build a latest-and-greatest Class 40 in a way that, you know, a normal person can actually afford.  

As I said, we continue to figure things out as we go...

Bow-4-15-21.jpg

 



Latest posts

SA Podcast

Sailing Anarchy Podcast with Scot Tempesta

Sponsored By:

Top