All things Class40

huey 2

Super Anarchist
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From the front page
 

EnriqueGracia

New member
7
1
Madrid
You really need to sail on a 40 first. Being longer, it will be a bit faster. But all those boats are wide & flat hull shapes & will suffer (lots of wetted surface) in light air. You might want to look at "Dragon" a first gen hull that's in top nick, and a bit skinnier in general
Thanks for the reply. When you say Dragon you refer to the class or to a specific boat?

Thanks again for the feedback.
 

EnriqueGracia

New member
7
1
Madrid
Why not look at something like a pogo 12.50 which is, in short-hand, a cruising version of a class 40? The modern class 40s
(including most of the boats that are doing the RdR) are pretty solidly incompatible with adding even the basic comfort amenities. As a benchmark, 144 has a jetboil for a galley, a bucket for a head, and water in 10l jugs only (unless some has to go into the fixed 20l tanks). This is the standard. Weight matters a lot and adding more gear would impact performance.

Most, though not all, of the 40s are optimized for a Route du Rhum course. They are not particularly close-winded, especially in light air, but once the wind breaks 12 and is on or aft of the beam, they take off. You could use the RORC races to compare the performance against other boats such as the JPKs and the J Boats.
Thanks for the feedback.

I am afraid Pogo 12.50 will be slower than a class 40 even when adding some minimal comforts like a shower outside, a small water tank and a toilet.
 

EnriqueGracia

New member
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1
Madrid
T
Yep.
If you want to be fast in light airs then go skinny. A Kerr 40 was much quicker than my 12.50 in light airs. The tradeoff is you need crew as the wind builds. I bought the Pogo because I wanted to be comfortable short handed in heavy airs.
If you want everything, Dragon would tick a lot of boxes.
Thanks for the feedback.

That kind of fast 40s is also in my radar, yes but the need for crew kills those options. I want to be able to sail all alone if needed while the most frequent will be 2-3. One of those faster alternatives with ballasts might do the trick and the only week points would be strong winds where probably class40 defends better (talking here about seamanship, not so much about speed).

Not sure which boat you mean by Dragon. The Dragon I know is class boat, for three with J type hull. Beautiful boat, but I don't think it is the one you refer to.

Thanks again,
 

longy

Overlord of Anarchy
6,986
1,282
San Diego
We are refering to a specific Class 40. Custom build, Owen Clarke design
Just checked Facebook, boat has been sold

Early design before the class went low freeboards, so better suited for what you want. Most early C 40 designs should suit you, the production build boats have more of an interior
 

EnriqueGracia

New member
7
1
Madrid
We are refering to a specific Class 40. Custom build, Owen Clarke design
Just checked Facebook, boat has been sold

Early design before the class went low freeboards, so better suited for what you want. Most early C 40 designs should suit you, the production build boats have more of an interior
Ok, thank you. I'll take a look, for sure.
 

huey 2

Super Anarchist
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https://www.owenclarkedesign.com/class-40-pixel-flyer-112 sold






The last posted here is the oldest and gets younger up the page

A lot of well set up boats that have been updated through time...
 

huey 2

Super Anarchist
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That was a fun race to follow...the holes and shifts and the tide
the top 6 taking different courses to each other, to roll the dice on the work up and then downwind and the reach and a short downwind to finish....Perfect thanks I liked the tracker and the geograhical map ...to re enact past trips in the mind and relive the nightmarish tide from a younger age
 

LeoV

Super Anarchist
12,991
3,975
The Netherlands
Tip&Shaft talk to Richomme.


You raced in the Route du Rhum on a Lift 1, the precursor of the scows, is this new generation very different? And do you feel that compared to 2018, the level of play has increased?
Yes, the boats have become very powerful, they're really taking off: all last night, we were going at 16 knots in 16 knots of wind on a reach, as soon as there were 20 knots, we went up to 18-19, that's still great to sail at these speeds on such basic boats. They hey are quite hard boats, the movements are very hard due to the very flat surfaces below, there is no cushioning, the slightest wave is transmitted to the boat, the slightest jump off a wave slams, shaking you on the spot, it's quite tiring. And the loads are starting to get heavy, there is a real physical efforts if you want to keep up with the leaders. As for the level of play, yes, it has clearly increased! The intensity of the racing is very close to what you see in Figaro, it's a real challenge to beat the 5-6 skippers who sail really well and are starting to know their boat very well.
 

ahabman

New member
1
0
I am interested in learning more about what the challenges are in sailing the Class 40 boats? What makes them hard/complex to sail? Assuming usage in fast cruising and some racing. I am looking for a challenge, and wonder what people think of these boats as a way to learn offshore racing (as an eventual goal). What does it take to learn to get to that level of boat? Assuming several years of training on smaller boats, whats a progression for someone who is a quick study? I don't want to beat everyone in a race, just go fast and have fun. These boats look amazing, so inspiring.
 

huey 2

Super Anarchist
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1,623
syd
When I was posting the boats for sale, I was reminded of when the Kiwi Verdier got to NZd and stopped their race...they were racing twoup but got beat up by the boat....the sea keeping abilities of the less powerful bigger boats in crewed round the world racing was what they were used to...They were not able to progress to the new small and violent 40s...
if I recall right ..."what sea legs,...I was crawling around to stay on the boat.."
 

Revboat

New member
39
80
Honolulu
Sorry, it's been a while since I updated on our build project... Blame a summer of hectic travel.

The project progresses but it's been too slow. Supply chains have been awful, with prices rising. We lost our work yard and had to adjust locations. Then a hurricane hit the Caribbean, then another... This has all caused challenges in work and supply from which we're still recovering. Because loss of time equals loss of money, my Class 40 project needs to see to some financing... or to sell the shell of this boat and begin a new one... or to sell another custom project to finance the rigging of this one. This is all part of building boats, I know. But, we see light ahead!

Hiccups aside, the construction has gone super well, and I thank everyone for their encouragements. The shell is virtually finished. The hull, deck, and interior reinforcements are all complete. We're just now finishing the installation of the water ballast tanks. We finished the bulb and keel fin. The rudders are under construction. So, in terms of real building, just the rig remains.

Early in the summer, after a somewhat long delay, we received the approval of our designs and construction plans from the Class 40 Association. So, I guess we can say that we're a recognized Class 40 project!

Some images:

Cockpit.jpg
Cockpit ready for gear installations. We'd just started the primer coat.

Shell.jpg
When it started looking a bit like a boat...

BareInterior.jpg
I wanted a scow-bow boat, like the new C40s, but with a more spacious, flexible interior, like the older C40s, which is why I custom built instead buying a vintage boat. I think I made the right decision... My long-suffering saint of a wife is withholding judgment...

Compression.jpg
We constructed a 'trellis frame' mast compression bulkhead instead of using a compression post. Keeps the interior more open.

ForePlate.jpg
Our final composite chainplate installation -- this one for the forestay. These composite plates are my favorite 'cool' feature. I geeked out on calculating their tensile strength.

BulbCrane.jpg
After casting, the lead bulb is maneuvered via hired crane. 1850kgs, if you're interested. Our ballast-to-weight ratio will be around 43%... and then you consider the water ballast... and the huge righting arm of these beamy hulls... and you can understand how Class 40s carry such massive sail plans.

SteelFin.jpg
We welded narrow 'stringers' onto our steel keel blade to make the foil extra rigid. We thought extra hard about this fin, and also the keel box, due to the recent spate of keel failures out there. Every little bit helps, I think.
 




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