America’s Cup Video Production Competition

Stingray

Super Anarchist
24,488
0
PNW
Got ideas?

--

34th America's Cup video talent competition launched today

Sunday, June 27th, 2010

VidContBann_585.jpg


VALENCIA, Spain (28 June 2010) – Do you have what it takes to supercharge the media production of the America's Cup?

So asks a video posted today on the official 34th America's Cup web site, www.americascup.com, that launches the America's Cup Video Production Competition.

Transforming the video output in a way that excites and engages the biggest ever audience is a primary goal for the 34th America's Cup. Fresh thinking for video production is being sought from Generation Y.

The America's Cup Video Production Competition is open to anyone so long as they're between the ages of 18 and 28 years of age.

All that is required is a clip of any length that illustrates production techniques and exciting, new perspectives that could boost coverage of the 34th America's Cup.

"Transforming television is the single-most important change we can make to this magnificent competition," said Russell Coutts, CEO of BMW ORACLE Racing, winners of the 33rd America's Cup.

Ambition is the main requirement for entry. Naturally, content must be original and 100-percent rights-cleared.



34th America's Cup Video Production Competition

Clips may be of any sport or activity and any combination of camerawork, editing and production. The 28-year age limit is in place with a view to blending new talent with the best and most-experienced specialists in sports broadcasting.

"We're looking to the next generation to help bring the screen alive," Coutts said. "We expect this competition to open our eyes to some creative concepts that will increase the event's appeal to younger audiences."

A panel of extreme sports and social media leaders will review the videos. Producers of the most interesting videos posted by 12 July 2010 will be flown to Valencia, Spain, to participate in the 34th America's Cup Media & Race Evaluation Trials slated for the end of July.

The ultimate competition winner, to be announced at the end of September, will get to choose from prizes that include a top of the range Apple MacBook Pro, installed with the latest video editing software, to a high-end, HD camera. Other finalists will receive BMW ORACLE Racing official team gear.

The competition video and details, including terms, timing and prizes, can be viewed on the official 34th America's Cup Web site at www.americascup.com/videocompetition.

Contestants are invited to enter the competition by posting their video at http://acvideocompetition.magnify.net.

--

 
Last edited by a moderator:

KiwiJoker

Super Anarchist
3,734
324
Auckland, NZ
Got ideas?

--
Early entry winners will receive economy class return travel from their home city, and hotel accommodation in Valencia, Spain so they can participate in the 34th America's Cup on-water media trials.
I've been pretty sceptical about the notion of video trials for monos vs multis. However the the concept of identifying young video innovators and making them part of the process is very positive stuff. Should be interesting!

 

st599

Member
151
0
London
The videoography of the cup really needs 2 aspects to be successful:

  1. Eye-catching drama
  2. Shots which offer a greater understanding of the sport


They have to face up to te fact that the majority of the television audience don't understand yacht racing and need to have visual indications of what is going on.

 
Despite what the Front Page says, I think this is a brillant idea. Instead of getting some old stoog from NY tell them how to film these races, get some input from the real innovators!

I'm hoping word gets out to some of the production kids working for Quiksilver, Burton, Red Bull etc get involved in this contest. Want to see some really cool footage, go to any of those

sites and check out what they've got posted. Beats the hell out of anything on ABC sports.

 

st599

Member
151
0
London
from here

http://www.yachtsponsorship.com/2010/06/americas-cup-searches-for-crowdsourced-cool-television-concepts/

With any luck, entrants will keep in mind that the audience for sailing, like F1 is looking for more than pictures. Incorporation of live data is as important as a fast edit or funky digital effect.

Is it just live data? When I last had an ask around on this subject (Beijing Olympic Coverage), it was understanding. Whilst quite a few watched the action, most turn-offs were because, whilst some parts were visually stunning, to the layperson it was confusing. It's a race, in which there is a very limited set course (leading to very spread fleets), where the environmental factors immediately affect tactics (but where these factors may not be visible on a 2-dimensional display and where the tactics are not understood by a wide audience), where the language of the commentators is specialised.....

These short crowd-sourced clips are probably good at generating interest - but how do we visually describe the action on the track.

 

Te Kooti

Super Anarchist
6,303
0
Is it just live data? When I last had an ask around on this subject (Beijing Olympic Coverage), it was understanding. Whilst quite a few watched the action, most turn-offs were because, whilst some parts were visually stunning, to the layperson it was confusing.

By all means, have a contest.

But, frankly, there are already extraordinary videographers in this game - like George Johns (Alinghi).

Also, it would be pretty hard to top what Dennis Harvey did in Akld during the 2000 defence and 2003 loss to Alinghi. Valencia, 2007, was not up to the standards set by TVNZ and Dennis Harvey!

Does anyone remember the Auckland LVC race involving AmericaOne versus Prada? Sails touching! Kostecki yelling!

Very, very compelling coverage!

Like some of you, I have cupboards full of old AC videotapes and sometimes watch old races.

They are almost exciting now as they were then.

Frankly, I do not think there is much wrong with the production aspects.

The problem is getting broadcasters to show this stuff.

 

shaggy

Super Anarchist
9,995
1,056
Co
The blueprint is already there, just show the pics of dudes in backwords hats bashing through 15 ft waves with "Hi Mom" written in Sharpie on their Tshirts. They did it in 1987 for crap sakes. Throw dennis in for good measure.....
laugh.gif


 

Stingray

Super Anarchist
24,488
0
PNW
^ Nice.

How about cams that get raised up the halyard along with the sail for that height-height-height view, and then once up there also do the SailVision thing, with so much accuracy they can project the sail shape in 3D superimposed or off on the side, and simluate airflow across it to derive how efficiently trimmed it is - all in real-time?

edit: maybe a simple/crude version of this idea


 
Last edited by a moderator:

Peelman

Super Anarchist
6,050
0
Vancouver, BC
Gathsports Helmets is a current supplier to BOR and they have experience with helmet cams. We saw them when DZ first came out and the crew was kitted out with helmets.

http://www.gathsport...ingle.php?id=31

Design features would have to include wireless tech, decent battery life and a clean helmet design so it doesn't get caught up on anything.

I fave testing audiences on various production collection and output formats. The AC Video Talent contest is a newsworthy and good PR item but as a starting point it's only one grain of sand on the beach.

Big issue with sailing production is being able to make it exciting for the youth and masses plus understood. Sailing is very much a more complicated sport to understand just with the equipment when compared to snowboarding or snowcross and etc. Add to that how sailboats actually use the fluids to move is another when compared to snow sports that use gavity or human power like cycling or track. Throw in the racing rules and it's a tough sport production wise to figure out what to sell.

 
Last edited by a moderator:

KiwiJoker

Super Anarchist
3,734
324
Auckland, NZ
from here

http://www.yachtspon...ision-concepts/

With any luck, entrants will keep in mind that the audience for sailing, like F1 is looking for more than pictures. Incorporation of live data is as important as a fast edit or funky digital effect.
These short crowd-sourced clips are probably good at generating interest - but how do we visually describe the action on the track.
And there you have it . . . "how do we visually describe the action on the track."

Much as I hate to endorse any part of Clean's psychotic rate on Page One, I think he's headed substantially in the right direction with this advice: " . . . get the Virtual Eye technology overlaid on actual video images, wire the most obnoxious and emotional for sound, and spend the boring 70% of the races showing footage of girls and interviews with the most interesting characters in sailing - those are the ones that will make TV possible. And make sure all the sponsors know that their team will only get good exposure if they make sure that the colorful guys (and girls...yeah, right) are required to speak their mind instead of toeing the corporate line on camera. And finally, give up any hope you might have that TV will cover this event on their own dime; until at least one Cup cycle proves that people will watch it, you're gonna have to pay them full price and recoup your costs in other ways."



Over the years, with the advent of digital technology and miniaturization we've watched massive improvements in imagery delivered to the screen. And Virtual Eye has developed the software to put it all in context and, what's more, is still improving it.



What's lacking is the way it's all stitched together. For sailing fans, but especially for newcomers,coverage has to tell an an understandable story. Too much sports TV these days,and especially sailing TV such as it is, consists of jazzy,colourful highlights. Fine but that doesn't help me understand the issues which governed why Boat A pulled off a slam dunk and Boat B was skunked. I want something more than an excited commentator voice with the increasingly ubiquitous south-of-London accent telling me what happened. I want it explained visually. And I want newcomers to sailing to share and comprehend that moment.

 

We've seen productions from TV and from VirtualEye, each with the ability to draw on the others's technology, and there is an obvious marked reluctance for each to do so. Here's one suggestion. Appoint a TV contractor committed to blend and develop the best of both technologies.

 



 
Last edited by a moderator:

Greenflash

Member
150
37
Just read the article, totally think the interviews are an awesome idea. They don't need to take the sailing off and put some girls on or a 'colourful' sailor... just do that AND MORE in a block in the corner of the screen so that we can keep an eye on the race but also enjoy insights from people, highlights from past races or discussions, design/construction info and of course a few gals won't hurt!

GF

 

Te Kooti

Super Anarchist
6,303
0
Big issue with sailing production is being able to make it exciting for the youth and masses plus understood.

I am all for the masses.

As for the youth, why does the entire society have to be rewired for them?

God bless the old buggars!

And long may they reign!

 

alexvb

Member
343
0
San Jose, CA
I don't really think that better video production will get anyone new excited about the America's Cup or sailing. The Catch-22 is that they have to see the footage to be persuaded that it is interesting. They have to think it might be interesting to see the footage in the first place. I two ways I can think of to get people to watch the America's Cup that are not already interested:

1. Create non-sailing reasons to watch it. Maybe get some celebrities involved. Maybe producers like Cameron or Lucas, "technologists" like Gates or Jobs (Larry Ellison isn't that well known outside the industry), or Athletes like Lance Armstrong or Brett Favre. Maybe just get some juicy scandal going on.

2. Get people interested in sailboat racing. Hold races on smaller boats in potential markets. Promote the races locally to non-sailors. Seeing exciting racing in person goes a long way to wanting to see videos of sailboats racing. Maybe even get people out on boats at the event so they can feel what it is like. $1M (team and sponsor money) goes a long way to running small boat races. They might have to do something like this for people that are interested in the America's Cup but not multihulls.

 

Stingray

Super Anarchist
24,488
0
PNW
Nice they chose to send ~three~ winners to Valencia, it was advertised as just for one.
My mistake, it says later

"Accettulli of Italy will join the video crew in Valencia for the upcoming production trials whilst White and Lesser are invited future trials scheduled in October."

 
Last edited by a moderator:




Top