An embarrassing first for Australia-Climate change responsibilities

ShortForBob

Super Anarchist
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Melbourne
In an embarrassing first for Australia, the United nations human rights committee has found that Australia violated the human rights of a group of Torres Strait Islanders by failing to adequately protect them from the impacts of climate change.


A United Nations committee has found that Australia violated the human rights of a group of Torres Strait Islanders by failing to adequately protect them from the impacts of climate change.

The groundbreaking finding by the United Nations Human Rights Committee was made in response to a complaint filed in 2019 by eight Torres Strait Islander adults and their children, from the small, low-lying islands of Boigu, Poruma, Warraber and Masig.

Rising sea levels have already damaged food sources and ancestral burial sites on the islands, scattering human remains and putting their homes at risk of being submerged, the Islanders argued.

The committee said Australia had violated two of their three human rights set out in a UN treaty, the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (1966) — the right to enjoy their culture and be free from arbitrary interferences with their private life, family and home, but not their right to life.

Some 173 of the 193 UN member states have ratified the covenant, including Australia. There is no enforcement mechanism but there are follow-up steps, and states generally comply with the committee's findings.

The UN Human Rights Committee called for the Australian government to provide the islanders with an effective remedy.

Yessie Mosby, one of the Torres Strait claimants from Masig Island, said he was speechless at the news.

"I am over the moon. I thank the heavenly father, I thank my ancestors and I thank all the people who fought and helped in this case," he said.

Mr Mosby said it had been a long journey since the group first lodged its landmark complaint three years ago.

"Still to this present day, we [have] seen a lot of our homes being eaten away," he told the ABC.

He said he had decided to lodge the complaint after finding his great-grandmother's remains unearthed by rising seas.

"We were picking her up like shells off the beach," he said.

"That drove me to stand and fight for our future generations."

Mr Mosby said he hoped the outcome would help other climate-affected communities seek justice and protection.

"This fight … is not only for our people but for all people who suffer against climate change," he said.

"If we can do it they can do it.

"If we can fight to save our home, then they can fight to save their homes as well, knowing that the door now has already been opened."

He urged the Australian government to act on the committee's recommendations and visit the Torres Strait Islands.

Decision could embolden others​

The case brought by the Torres Strait Islander group, known as the "Torres Strait Eight", is one of a growing body of climate cases being brought around the world on human rights grounds, and the ruling is expected to embolden others.

Eight Torres Strait Islander people pose proudly for the camera in front of a tropical-looking garden.

The "Torres Strait Eight", from left: Yessie Mosby, Kabay Tamu, Keith Pabai, Nazareth Warria, Stanley Marama, Ted Billy, Daniel Billy and Nazareth Fauid.(Supplied: ClientEarth)
"This decision marks a significant development, as the committee has created a pathway for individuals to assert claims where national systems have failed to take appropriate measures to protect those most vulnerable to the negative impacts of climate change on the enjoyment of their human rights," committee member Hélène Tigroudja said.

The Morrison government had called for the case to be dismissed, saying there was insufficient evidence that the consequences of climate change would affect the islanders' enjoyment of their rights.

Attorney-General Mark Dreyfus said the Albanese government was committed to working with Torres Strait Islanders on climate change.

"Soon after the change of government, the Prime Minister, the Minister for Indigenous Affairs and the Minister for Climate Change and Energy travelled to the Torres Strait to talk with elders and owners about the impacts of climate change on them," Mr Dreyfus said.

"The Australian government is considering the committee's views and will provide its response in due course."
 
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billy backstay

Backstay, never bought a suit, never went to Vegas
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veni vidi vici

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In an embarrassing first for Australia, the United nations human rights committee has found that Australia violated the human rights of a group of Torres Strait Islanders by failing to adequately protect them from the impacts of climate change.


A United Nations committee has found that Australia violated the human rights of a group of Torres Strait Islanders by failing to adequately protect them from the impacts of climate change.

The groundbreaking finding by the United Nations Human Rights Committee was made in response to a complaint filed in 2019 by eight Torres Strait Islander adults and their children, from the small, low-lying islands of Boigu, Poruma, Warraber and Masig.

Rising sea levels have already damaged food sources and ancestral burial sites on the islands, scattering human remains and putting their homes at risk of being submerged, the Islanders argued.

The committee said Australia had violated two of their three human rights set out in a UN treaty, the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (1966) — the right to enjoy their culture and be free from arbitrary interferences with their private life, family and home, but not their right to life.

Some 173 of the 193 UN member states have ratified the covenant, including Australia. There is no enforcement mechanism but there are follow-up steps, and states generally comply with the committee's findings.

The UN Human Rights Committee called for the Australian government to provide the islanders with an effective remedy.

Yessie Mosby, one of the Torres Strait claimants from Masig Island, said he was speechless at the news.

"I am over the moon. I thank the heavenly father, I thank my ancestors and I thank all the people who fought and helped in this case," he said.

Mr Mosby said it had been a long journey since the group first lodged its landmark complaint three years ago.

"Still to this present day, we [have] seen a lot of our homes being eaten away," he told the ABC.

He said he had decided to lodge the complaint after finding his great-grandmother's remains unearthed by rising seas.

"We were picking her up like shells off the beach," he said.

"That drove me to stand and fight for our future generations."

Mr Mosby said he hoped the outcome would help other climate-affected communities seek justice and protection.

"This fight … is not only for our people but for all people who suffer against climate change," he said.

"If we can do it they can do it.

"If we can fight to save our home, then they can fight to save their homes as well, knowing that the door now has already been opened."

He urged the Australian government to act on the committee's recommendations and visit the Torres Strait Islands.

Decision could embolden others​

The case brought by the Torres Strait Islander group, known as the "Torres Strait Eight", is one of a growing body of climate cases being brought around the world on human rights grounds, and the ruling is expected to embolden others.

Eight Torres Strait Islander people pose proudly for the camera in front of a tropical-looking garden.

The "Torres Strait Eight", from left: Yessie Mosby, Kabay Tamu, Keith Pabai, Nazareth Warria, Stanley Marama, Ted Billy, Daniel Billy and Nazareth Fauid.(Supplied: ClientEarth)
"This decision marks a significant development, as the committee has created a pathway for individuals to assert claims where national systems have failed to take appropriate measures to protect those most vulnerable to the negative impacts of climate change on the enjoyment of their human rights," committee member Hélène Tigroudja said.

The Morrison government had called for the case to be dismissed, saying there was insufficient evidence that the consequences of climate change would affect the islanders' enjoyment of their rights.

Attorney-General Mark Dreyfus said the Albanese government was committed to working with Torres Strait Islanders on climate change.

"Soon after the change of government, the Prime Minister, the Minister for Indigenous Affairs and the Minister for Climate Change and Energy travelled to the Torres Strait to talk with elders and owners about the impacts of climate change on them," Mr Dreyfus said.

"The Australian government is considering the committee's views and will provide its response in due course."
Bullshit !
 

Steam Flyer

Sophisticated Yet Humble
44,193
9,580
Eastern NC
For those who don't know what I am talking about:

The problem with Smith/Tangier Islanders trying to sue the gov't for their loss is that the loss has been going on since before any currently living Islander was born. Their remedy is to fucking move, not try to make the rest of us pay for their bad decisions.
 

kent_island_sailor

Super Anarchist
27,218
5,136
Kent Island!
That's 8 year old copy, is there more recent news detailing the changes since?


.
Pretty much same old same old. The islands are slowly vanishing and the flooding is getting worse.

If you are there at high tide it is possible to be walking in water on many of the roads. A good part of the south end of the ramp at the airport is taken up by various vehicles and equipment, that is a high spot that rarely floods. What used to be ubiquitous golf carts are now gone, electric vehicles sitting in salt water didn't work out. They have ATVs now. You'll notice many houses have duckboard paths to the door so you don't have to wade through water to get in and out.

This was last year:
1663943211270.png
 

00seven

James "Grumpy" Bond
2,899
808
Blue marble
In an embarrassing first for Australia, the United nations human rights committee has found that Australia violated the human rights of a group of Torres Strait Islanders by failing to adequately protect them from the impacts of climate change.


A United Nations committee has found that Australia violated the human rights of a group of Torres Strait Islanders by failing to adequately protect them from the impacts of climate change.

The groundbreaking finding by the United Nations Human Rights Committee was made in response to a complaint filed in 2019 by eight Torres Strait Islander adults and their children, from the small, low-lying islands of Boigu, Poruma, Warraber and Masig.

Rising sea levels have already damaged food sources and ancestral burial sites on the islands, scattering human remains and putting their homes at risk of being submerged, the Islanders argued.

The committee said Australia had violated two of their three human rights set out in a UN treaty, the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (1966) — the right to enjoy their culture and be free from arbitrary interferences with their private life, family and home, but not their right to life.

Some 173 of the 193 UN member states have ratified the covenant, including Australia. There is no enforcement mechanism but there are follow-up steps, and states generally comply with the committee's findings.

The UN Human Rights Committee called for the Australian government to provide the islanders with an effective remedy.

Yessie Mosby, one of the Torres Strait claimants from Masig Island, said he was speechless at the news.

"I am over the moon. I thank the heavenly father, I thank my ancestors and I thank all the people who fought and helped in this case," he said.

Mr Mosby said it had been a long journey since the group first lodged its landmark complaint three years ago.

"Still to this present day, we [have] seen a lot of our homes being eaten away," he told the ABC.

He said he had decided to lodge the complaint after finding his great-grandmother's remains unearthed by rising seas.

"We were picking her up like shells off the beach," he said.

"That drove me to stand and fight for our future generations."

Mr Mosby said he hoped the outcome would help other climate-affected communities seek justice and protection.

"This fight … is not only for our people but for all people who suffer against climate change," he said.

"If we can do it they can do it.

"If we can fight to save our home, then they can fight to save their homes as well, knowing that the door now has already been opened."

He urged the Australian government to act on the committee's recommendations and visit the Torres Strait Islands.

Decision could embolden others​

The case brought by the Torres Strait Islander group, known as the "Torres Strait Eight", is one of a growing body of climate cases being brought around the world on human rights grounds, and the ruling is expected to embolden others.

Eight Torres Strait Islander people pose proudly for the camera in front of a tropical-looking garden.

The "Torres Strait Eight", from left: Yessie Mosby, Kabay Tamu, Keith Pabai, Nazareth Warria, Stanley Marama, Ted Billy, Daniel Billy and Nazareth Fauid.(Supplied: ClientEarth)
"This decision marks a significant development, as the committee has created a pathway for individuals to assert claims where national systems have failed to take appropriate measures to protect those most vulnerable to the negative impacts of climate change on the enjoyment of their human rights," committee member Hélène Tigroudja said.

The Morrison government had called for the case to be dismissed, saying there was insufficient evidence that the consequences of climate change would affect the islanders' enjoyment of their rights.

Attorney-General Mark Dreyfus said the Albanese government was committed to working with Torres Strait Islanders on climate change.

"Soon after the change of government, the Prime Minister, the Minister for Indigenous Affairs and the Minister for Climate Change and Energy travelled to the Torres Strait to talk with elders and owners about the impacts of climate change on them," Mr Dreyfus said.

"The Australian government is considering the committee's views and will provide its response in due course."
Poor buggers look to be in terrible shape from all this climate change, don't they? Doesn't the UN realise that the Torres Strait Islands were once a land bridge to PNG? I'm no anthropologist but those people all look Motu to me, the hair & facial features are a tell for me.
 

ShortForBob

Super Anarchist
34,892
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Melbourne
Thing is. how do you fix it for those islands?
Sandbag? put inflatables under the islands? lots of buckets?

Serious question.

it's too late to save these coral cays even if we halted all CC tomorrow.

So what is expected of the Australian Gov for these people. Relocation or compensation or both.
 

FinnFish

Super Anarchist
3,906
423
Ah another Meli attention whoring thread.

Here's 'an effective and immediate remedy' for the islanders. Turn off all diesel generators, ban LNG and any transport that relies on fossil fuels, action starts in your own backyard after all.

Another pointless waste of time FFS.

Dalley-Figure-15.4_opt.png


79418f0c21c33ede229621bee4bcb107
 

LB 15

Cunt
Since you hate this country so much mell , why don’t you fuck off back to England you winging Pom. The only embarrassing thing about this country is you, you pain in the arse attention whore. But don’t back go to Greece - those poor cunts have suffered enough this year.
What happened to you singing in the church choir? Let me guess, they kicked you out for wanting to be centre stage?
 

The Dark Knight

Super Anarchist
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Yes, this is embarrassing for the United Nations hrc for failing to adequately protect them from the impacts of climate change….

What does the UNHRC expect Australia to do? Even if we went “net zero” in 2020, climate change is going to get them because Australia’s contribution is SFA. Getting our act together is only every going to make a symbolic difference, barely a measurable difference. Even if Australia was “leading the way” in the current political climate, our effort would have zero influence on the biggest or 2nd biggest emitter, China.

Meli go fuck yourself.
 

sparau

Super Anarchist
1,079
203
Sunshine Coast Aus
My goodness you are a bunch of hate filled old turds.
I'm pretty sure she has you all on ignore so you are just spreading bile amongst yourselves lol
As to the topic at hand it does open up a legal means for restitution, not that any fiscal amount can repair losing your society and home.
Meli, as to the question of what can be done? I'm not sure we understand / can model it well enough but about all I can think of is creating artificial breakwaters and trying to get the ocean currents to drop sand onto sections at least of the island to build it up.
Comparatively small changes can, AFAIK, make large changes to sand formations.
 

charisma94

Fucking Legend
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My goodness you are a bunch of hate filled old turds.
I'm pretty sure she has you all on ignore so you are just spreading bile amongst yourselves lol
As to the topic at hand it does open up a legal means for restitution, not that any fiscal amount can repair losing your society and home.
Meli, as to the question of what can be done? I'm not sure we understand / can model it well enough but about all I can think of is creating artificial breakwaters and trying to get the ocean currents to drop sand onto sections at least of the island to build it up.
Comparatively small changes can, AFAIK, make large changes to sand formations.
YCMTSU

Yes mate, you & Meli should get your heads together and design us some breakwaters. That'll fix the Torres Straight...

Fark me...
 

Fah Kiew Tu

Curmudgeon, First Rank
10,062
3,241
Tasmania, Australia
My goodness you are a bunch of hate filled old turds.
I'm pretty sure she has you all on ignore so you are just spreading bile amongst yourselves lol
As to the topic at hand it does open up a legal means for restitution, not that any fiscal amount can repair losing your society and home.
Meli, as to the question of what can be done? I'm not sure we understand / can model it well enough but about all I can think of is creating artificial breakwaters and trying to get the ocean currents to drop sand onto sections at least of the island to build it up.
Comparatively small changes can, AFAIK, make large changes to sand formations.

Hate? Mate, you've sucked really deeply on the 'attribute shit to avoid addressing the issue' play. It doesn't work on the internet, sorry to tell you.

I doubt anyone hates Meli. Speaking for myself only, I regard her with a mix of amused condescension to annoyed contempt. And this because she posts on topics she knows nothing about, refuses to read anything that might address or correct her biases and doubles down on the crap instead of gracefully admitting she's wrong or ill informed.

You might like that sort of thing but I don't. It's intellectually dishonest. If you'd tried shit like that even in first year university when I went there, you'd get your head in your hands by the tutor, let alone the lecturers. And you'd deserve it.

Australia can do fuck-all about sea level rise. Period. Eliminating every bit of our CO2 emissions will make no difference at all. We're a bit player. It'd be like plugging a 1.5mm hole in your hull while the water was pouring in via a 75mm one you were assiduously ignoring, all the while posturing that you 'were doing something'. Sure, something totally useless overall.

Most Australians live on the fringes of drowned river valleys. It's the height of arrogance to think we can stop this at the current level. Yes, the increase in CO2 has likely sped the process up, but that's rate of change and it's likely too late now.

More La Nina events and increased inland rainfall, plus the increase in plant food (CO2) may actually be good for the Australian continent and vegetation overall. Pity about the bits on the fringes...

And I'm still waiting for my deep waterfront. Maybe if the Thwaites Glacier does what people say, I might get it.

Oh and BTW, I did 'grow' a beach via a strategically placed groyne. It's taken 20 years to get a very small beach. Not exactly a fast process and there's still 100m of sandy mud at low tide. Hence my wish for 1m of sea level rise.

FKT
 

ShortForBob

Super Anarchist
34,892
2,777
Melbourne
My goodness you are a bunch of hate filled old turds.
I'm pretty sure she has you all on ignore so you are just spreading bile amongst yourselves lol
As to the topic at hand it does open up a legal means for restitution, not that any fiscal amount can repair losing your society and home.
Meli, as to the question of what can be done? I'm not sure we understand / can model it well enough but about all I can think of is creating artificial breakwaters and trying to get the ocean currents to drop sand onto sections at least of the island to build it up.
Comparatively small changes can, AFAIK, make large changes to sand formations.
Interesting notion. There must be someone doing some research about this. It's not as if low lying countries haven't had to do something before.
Thinking about how land reclamation works.
YCMTSU

Yes mate, you & Meli should get your heads together and design us some breakwaters. That'll fix the Torres Straight...Strait

Fark me...
Well Sparu has an interesting idea. Torres strait is pretty shallow. Why cant some huge engineering project change the currents and redirect the flow so as to build these places up?
Serious question. I know nothing about such things other than knowing land is reclaimed from the sea all the time and all over the planet.
Netherlands, Malaysia, singapore and how about those island the Chinese are building in the south china sea?

Dredge the strait and dump the sand on the cays? with barriers to stop the sand washing away?
not quite that simple because it's one thing to dredge to build an airport on reclaimed land and another to do it without causing catastrophic damage to the very environment one is trying to save.
I would have thought that this is the very same sort of blokey problem that fascinates.
Any engineers here?
 




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