"An eviction tsunami"

justsomeguy!

Super Anarchist
6,940
1,623
shithole countries
When the property market is as hot as it's been
Aye, there's the rub. 

Point is one has to plan for an empty property as well as repairs etc .
That type of planning is hard to do, especially in a down economy.

In my experience, tenants don't always follow the agreed upon lease terms, from giving 30 days notice or routine maintenance, leaky toilets and faucets, gas/electric payments, even keeping a phone number up to date with the landlord.

Having their boyfriend/girlfriend/family/friends move in with them got pretty rampant during the last downturn.

Boom, there goes your water bill.

 

ShortForBob

Super Anarchist
36,413
3,160
Melbourne
Aye, there's the rub. 

That type of planning is hard to do, especially in a down economy.

In my experience, tenants don't always follow the agreed upon lease terms, from giving 30 days notice or routine maintenance, leaky toilets and faucets, gas/electric payments, even keeping a phone number up to date with the landlord.

Having their boyfriend/girlfriend/family/friends move in with them got pretty rampant during the last downturn.

Boom, there goes your water bill.
Hmm. tenants pay their own water bill here.

Boom, there goes your carefully manicured garden :)

 

Pertinacious Tom

Importunate Member
63,960
2,203
Punta Gorda FL
With an eviction on her record in this tight market, I'd be surprised if she could rent an abandoned crack house.
Sounds like she went to a lot of trouble to get that eviction on her record and does deserve what it will bring. Few things bring a hard NO from me, that would be one.

I've been a tenant. Every landlord I've ever had has found or even made an excuse to keep my security deposit.
I had that happen in college and felt it totally unjustified. We had taken darn good care of the house for a few years, especially if grading on the "rented to a bunch of college guys" curve. The landlord told us he was keeping the deposit and to sue him. Stupidly, he did this a couple of days before we were to leave. We, uh, didn't leave it cleaner than we found it.

I've refunded most deposits, including in a couple of cases refunding the "cleaning fee" that I don't have to refund because tenants left it so clean. Where I've kept some or all of a deposit, I first explained to the tenant what I was keeping and why and got their agreement.

If they don't agree, I'd better be ready to explain to a judge what I've done. What happened to us back in college could not happen to FL tenants today and the landlord would stand a good chance of some kind of punitive damages if he couldn't document his case to a judge.

 

00seven

James "Grumpy" Bond
3,513
1,057
Blue marble
Sure, I've been a landlord too, paying off two houses mine and a rental. I was an easy going  Landlord simply because I've known too many of the other kind. 

When the property market is as hot as it's been in Australia, frankly you could rent your place for nothing and still make 5-10% PA on your investments. No need to squeeze tenants.

Point is one has to plan for an empty property as well as repairs etc . Don't do it if you cant take a hit or, worst case, have enough equity in the rental to sell if you must.
What a load of crap

 

Burning Man

Super Anarchist
10,843
2,247
Back to the desert
Thanks for solidifying my commitment to never be a landlord. Of course, I find myself as a landlord for my father's house, but I get no rent and pay the taxes and insurance, as the tenant is my father's cousin, who he promised to care for. She's sweet. Her dogs are doing a number on the floors however. Oh well.
Yeah, if you get a good tenant, it's smooth sailing.  I have one sweet old lady that is renting a house we bought several years ago and was so happy we were not going to kick her out.  She's been great except for the odd repair call.

But we've had two tenants stop paying rent over the last 4 years.  One guy, a retired USAF Master Sergeant I'm ashamed to say, just stopped paying and eventually did a runner out of state.  Hi back rent was north of $7K.  We tried to work with him numerous times to get him back on track as an eviction was a PITA and we tried to keep him in the house.  This latest cunt is #2.  We just got renters into house #4 and so far so good..... fingers crossed.  We've filed small claims against both of the shitbag tenants, but not terribly confident we will ever see a dime.  

I am just amazed at how much drama the average person has in their lives.  There's always some excuse.  I think both of the above issues stemmed from a jackass of a property manager we had while we were overseas.  He turned out to be a lazy cunt and hid a lot of issues from us and he was the one who supposedly "vetted" those renters.  Now that we're local - we can do a much more thorough job screening applicants.  We'll see if we are any better judges of people that the fuck knuckle prop manager that was recommended to us before.  

 

Burning Man

Super Anarchist
10,843
2,247
Back to the desert
I've seen similar enough to understand, and hate humanity.   The smart tenant can stall out the clock and trash your property for months.  I recall having to repaint because roaches came out at night and stuck to the fresh paint.   Frozen pipes are so much fun because some deadbeat leaves overnight January.   Broken toilet because the boyfriend was too drunk to stand.  A buddy did commercial maintenance and saw ceiling lights full of water because the vanity upstairs had been leaking for months. 

I've also looked at bankruptcy claims and noticed how many had jewelry and other non essential purchases on the list of creditors.  Meanwhile, I've never seen a penny from a bankruptcy settlement.   Bring back debtor's prison, or better yet the pillory.   

No, I will never rent residential again.  Far too much headache, without bleeding heart  librarians trying to claim the landlord is cruel for expecting financial compensation for letting the tenant trash his property.
Yup, I'm just growing more hardened to fact that too many people at the lower end of the wage scale are at the lower end of the wage scale not because of "lack of opportunity", but because they are shitbag disgusting pieces of human filth who make poor decisions constantly and then cries "Woe is me" when their life sucks.  

Seriously, fuck them!

 

Burning Man

Super Anarchist
10,843
2,247
Back to the desert
An indebted tenant with kids can put 2 generations under water. 
Then they should make better choices.  Both of my shit tenants had more than enough income to afford the rent.  We bent over backwards to give them every chances to slowly catch up on back rent.  We did this for years before ever even considering any eviction action.  And we didn't argue if the rent came in a little late.  So it wasn't like "Your rent is late 10 days - GTFO".  

But when you willfully spend all your income on crap and you ignore your responsibility to pay your debts, then any negative consequences is squarely and solely on THEM.  FUCK THEM!  I hope they fucking freeze in a ditch.  

 

ShortForBob

Super Anarchist
36,413
3,160
Melbourne
Then they should make better choices.  Both of my shit tenants had more than enough income to afford the rent.  We bent over backwards to give them every chances to slowly catch up on back rent.  We did this for years before ever even considering any eviction action.  And we didn't argue if the rent came in a little late.  So it wasn't like "Your rent is late 10 days - GTFO".  

But when you willfully spend all your income on crap and you ignore your responsibility to pay your debts, then any negative consequences is squarely and solely on THEM.  FUCK THEM!  I hope they fucking freeze in a ditch.  
try looking at the broader picture for a change. Everyone's had bad tenants. But most tenants aren't bad. 

If you're constantly getting bad tenants, maybe there's another reason why. Could be the property, could be your vetting practices. 

 
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longy

Overlord of Anarchy
7,443
1,560
San Diego
I had a rental house for 18 yrs. I told the tenants that eviction papers would be filed the day after rent was due if it didn't show up or I didn't get a phone call. I said I wasn't mad at them, just had to get the clock started. I'm in SoCal, laws are heavily slanted to the tenants. Never had more than a few days late, ended up selling to the last tenant.

 

ShortForBob

Super Anarchist
36,413
3,160
Melbourne
dogwhistle-1.jpg


 

Pertinacious Tom

Importunate Member
63,960
2,203
Punta Gorda FL
He turned out to be a lazy cunt and hid a lot of issues from us and he was the one who supposedly "vetted" those renters.
I've worked in sales and know it's work, so when I got into rentals I decided to let a property manager do the selling part.

Easy pick because a close friend (you've all seen his pic, partner with me in an F-27) is a realtor who has a property management service in his office.

Never again. You're picking a business partner. I don't want anyone to do it for me because I want someone with whom I can "click." How does anyone know whether one person will get along with another? They can't. I wouldn't even let my wife pick tenants. I have to deal with them, not her.

 

BeSafe

Super Anarchist
8,270
1,517
Hmm. tenants pay their own water bill here.

Boom, there goes your carefully manicured garden :)
I don't know if it's universally true but in the two US states where I have purchased a house, the water/sewer are tied to each other and to the property itself.  In other words, if you buy a house and the previous owner didn't pay the water bill, its now YOUR water bill now.  That's part of closing - to take care of that kinda thing and any other tax/claims against the property.

You can 'charge' the water bill to the tenant - but the bill goes to the property owner.

 
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ShortForBob

Super Anarchist
36,413
3,160
Melbourne
I don't know if it's universally true but in the two US states where I have purchased a house, the water/sewer are tied to each other and to the property itself.  In other words, if you buy a house and the previous owner didn't pay the water bill, its now YOUR water bill now.  That's part of closing - to take care of that kinda thing and any other tax/claims against the property.

You can 'charge' the water bill to the tenant - but the bill goes to the property owner.
Hmm..we just get the metre read before occupancy.

 

Burning Man

Super Anarchist
10,843
2,247
Back to the desert
I don't know if it's universally true but in the two US states where I have purchased a house, the water/sewer are tied to each other and to the property itself.  In other words, if you buy a house and the previous owner didn't pay the water bill, its now YOUR water bill now.  That's part of closing - to take care of that kinda thing and any other tax/claims against the property.

You can 'charge' the water bill to the tenant - but the bill goes to the property owner.
That's not unusual.  Where I am, If the tenant refuses to pay and does a runner, Any unpaid bills are the owners problem.  The owner would have to pay it off and then attempt to collect from the deadbeat cunt.  I think here it applies to water/sewer only whereas the electric and gas are in the name of the tenant and they have to have credit checks on them before they will get service and follows them if they leave.  That's partially why I charge at least 2 months rent as deposit so I can pay any of these bills if they screw me.  

 
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Pertinacious Tom

Importunate Member
63,960
2,203
Punta Gorda FL
The water bill thing is also a matter of who should assume risk. A tree broke my main water line out in a part of the property where I seldom go and by the time I found it, our water bill was $800. And that after the city reduced it to their lowest rate.

We've got some old homes with old pipes in the concrete floors. One of those could run up a big bill. OK, who should have replaced the pipe sooner, the tenant or me?

 

00seven

James "Grumpy" Bond
3,513
1,057
Blue marble
The water bill thing is also a matter of who should assume risk. A tree broke my main water line out in a part of the property where I seldom go and by the time I found it, our water bill was $800. And that after the city reduced it to their lowest rate.

We've got some old homes with old pipes in the concrete floors. One of those could run up a big bill. OK, who should have replaced the pipe sooner, the tenant or me?
Meli's half truths again Tom. The property owner is billed for usage by the provider, the usage bill is passed on to the renter. Maintenance on the property side of the meter is the property owner's gig, on the outside it's the provider's.

 
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