Anchor Shackles

Blue Crab

benthivore
16,155
2,598
Outer Banks
Recently I read something about swapping out shackles as a maintenance item. As a small boat guy, I've never given this much thought and own an assortment of used items. From a best practices pov, how to know which are the highest quality? I've bought some Crosbys in the past with no worries. Now I see West has Titans. Wordwise "Titan" sounds strong but is this one of those things that the Chinese make that might be questionable? I know they can make good stuff. I generally assume Amazon and EBay stuff is low cost Chinese.

Thinking my new rig will be a galv Mantus with say ten feet of 1/4" G43 and two good shackles and a new rode. Any reason to use stainless at all? TIA

 

Orion Jim

Member
292
154
New England
Load rated Crosby galvanized anchor shackles are the way to go. G-209 or G-209A with Acco high test or BBB. Your life may depend on your ground tackle....it is no place to economize. 

 

Soho

Member
419
7
Bermuda..
Load rated Crosby galvanized anchor shackles are the way to go. G-209 or G-209A with Acco high test or BBB. Your life may depend on your ground tackle....it is no place to economize. 
+1  on the Crosby and Acco

Also,  not sure of your exact boat and usage profile, but you might want to think about more than 10' of chain,  makes a big difference.  I think I have 15' of chain on my 16' Whaler.... 

 

AaronD

New member
35
17
Newberg, OR
This is a good question, and (like many things sailing-related), a rather large rabbit hole to dive into, should you so choose.

Practical Sailor did a good examination of anchor shackles (in Aug 2015 and Oct 2016, and then revised in Jan 2017). The quick takeaway was to use a Grade B shackle, as a lower-rated Grade A will generally be weaker than the chain it's attached to, especially in conjunction with high-test chain (G4 / G43 or higher). Grade B shackles are made from alloy steel, and usually just under 2x the strength of Grade A.

That's all good; but, like me, you're using 1/4" chain, which means a 5/16" shackle (the largest that will fit in 1/4" chain). I had been using a Crosby G209 red-pin, a Grade A with a working load limit of 1500 lbs, vs. 2600 for the chain. And it turns out 5/16" Grade B's are hard to find.

In the Oct 2016 issue of PS, they recommended Peerless Peer-Lift Blue pin (Model 8058303, WLL 2500 lbs). They also recommended other brands, but the Peerless was the only one available in sizes below 3/8". But then, in their Jan 2017 issue, they repeated some of the tests, and found that the Peerless failed at about 82% of its rated minimum breaking strength. So they canceled that recommendation. They still recommend some other brands, but those are only available in 3/8" and larger.

I wrote to PS a couple times, asking about options for 5/16" shackles. But they only pointed me to Internet sources for 3/8" - not very helpful. I did find one from Yoke in 8mm (roughly 5/16”), rated for 1.2t: http://www.yokeusa.com/shackle­807.html http://www.yokeusa.com/shackle-807.html. I tried to order it from Metro Supply (http://www.metrosupplyllc.com/product/8-807), but they couldn't actually source one from their supplier.

I ended up mentally downrating the Peerless to 80% of its rated 2500 lbs; still 2k lbs, which is better than 1500 for the Crosby G209 I had, and a pretty close match for our 1/4" G43 chain. For some reason, working load for G43 is rated at 33% of breaking strength instead of 25% used for other grades of chain. So a more realistic WLL is really ~1900 lbs vs. its rated 2600.

I decided that's close enough and bought a 5-pack of Peerless shackles from Fastenal. YMMV.

 

Zonker

Super Anarchist
9,641
5,609
Canada
Crosby is the gold standard if you can get them. (Not too hard to get but you are more likely to find them at an industrial supplier that sells chain and other lifting gear)

 

Blue Crab

benthivore
16,155
2,598
Outer Banks
That's all good; but, like me, you're using 1/4" chain, which means a 5/16" shackle (the largest that will fit in 1/4" chain). I had been using a Crosby G209 red-pin, a Grade A with a working load limit of 1500 lbs, vs. 2600 for the chain. And it turns out 5/16" Grade B's are hard to find.
Yeah. I was just in the Mantus catalog. No galv 5/16" shackles. 

I'm not sure why but I'd prefer gal over stainless with my G43 chain. It seems silly to me to buy two Crosbys for $10 apiece when I have a dozen used shackles in my storage stash but I think I will anyway. There's a fastenal nearby, may as well go look. Catalog doesn't mention brands. Couple of comm'l outfits close by but all they sell is proof coil stuff. 

Thanks for the expertise guys. 

 

Zonker

Super Anarchist
9,641
5,609
Canada
Don't buy no-name Chinese.

Don't use stainless steel shackles to connect galv anchor and galv chain.

 

Blue Crab

benthivore
16,155
2,598
Outer Banks
Don't buy no-name Chinese.

Don't use stainless steel shackles to connect galv anchor and galv chain.
Thanks Cap. Defender has both Acco galv G4 and the Crosby G209 shackles. An email got me a courtesy 10% on the Mantus. I likes me a good night's sleep.

 

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