anchoring presentation

estarzinger

Super Anarchist
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Draft of a presentation (powerpoint) I am working on:

http://www.bethandevans.com/pdf/Anchoring.pptx

Intended to be practical . . . .what do we actually do . . . . rather than a comprehensive book.

I only have 45 minutes, and probably already have too many slides, so if I add more material I probably also have to cut somewhere.

Comments or suggestions?

 

py26129

Super Anarchist
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Montreal
Estar

Nice presentation. I especially like the first slide!

I think you may be right that it's a bit long for 45 minutes. I have done a couple of presentations in the last few years and have found that I needed to leave some time for questions.

My seminars have ranged from Safety on the lake to Basic Cruising seminars. The audience was composed of expereinced day sailors & racers but few had much ovenight / cruising experience.

 

estarzinger

Super Anarchist
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^^ Its going to be a small audience, and I will be hanging around, and at meals, and on a panel later, so I think/hope we can fit many of the questions one-on-one outside the 45 minutes. But there will of course be the typical clarifications questions along the way. So, I think it is still probably long just for good delivery.

But initially, with this draft, I want to make sure I have all the essential content covered. Then I can tighten/shorten it up . . . . and I also probably have too many dull text bullet point slides - I will have to see if I can make them more graphic.

So, my key question right now is: am I missing anything important/critical or have anything just dead wrong?

 
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Speng

Super Anarchist
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Cincinnati, OH
Should be ok. You don't have too many texty slides and some of the you'll evidently be skipping thru quickly. Do you think though that the shore tie will be useful for many people? Where do/can you use it?

 

Ron Swanson

Member
396
60
Los Angeles
Evans,

Your clear, organized thinking continues to impress me.

What about anchor (dragging) alarms? Leaving vessel unattended? Or are you saying the BIG anchor does away with the need?

 

Point Break

Super Anarchist
26,296
3,952
Long Beach, California
Nice presentation. Don't know if you want to spend any time on ground tackle, but beer fueled cockpit anchoring discussions always include differences of opinions on the merits of using an anchor swivel in your ground tackle. ie. weak point versus anchor chain kinks from swinging with tide over some period of time.

 

Innocent Bystander

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Lower Southern MD
Should be ok. You don't have too many texty slides and some of the you'll evidently be skipping thru quickly. Do you think though that the shore tie will be useful for many people? Where do/can you use it?
I've seen it used (and used it) in the PNW. Both for coves where there is not much swinging room (med mooring style with an anchor off the bow and where the bottom is very steep (0-75+ in a few boat lengths) and anchoring bow out with a line to shore allow you to pull the hook "upslope" and a 100-200 foot line from the stern gets to a handy tree. A 4 square tie is less common but, as Evans shows in the pic, really useful when needed.

 

Kenny Dumas

Super Anarchist
1,651
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Oregon
Good stuff. Maybe add:

-Tides: Water depth and current direction to the "pick a good spot"

-Kellets: Work great to minimize swing and let you sleep easier since it really quiets down the ride

-Bridals: Minimize swing, including on a side-tie shore line, you can then use a single shore line and make a bridal ~1 boat length out and tie it to bow and stern instead of a complete 4 square tie

-Butterfly sail or other draggy sail from the stern to reduce swing

-Carry some rock climbing hardware like cams or jam nuts for grabbing a rock wall in a fjord

 

TQA

Super Anarchist
1,208
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Caribbean
What about anchoring in a spot where it is known that there are snags. Tripping line to a float versus tripping line tied to the main rode with breakable ties.

In the days when we were allowed to anchor in Elizabeth harbour Antigua the old hurricane chains were always a worry.

 

estarzinger

Super Anarchist
7,624
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Thanks for the suggestions . . . . .

Do you think though that the shore tie will be useful for many people? Where do/can you use it?
For low latitudes I agree it's generally not so useful, however this audience is (most of them) going high latitude, and its a useful trick to have in the bag both in the PNW and in Patagonia. We also used it to good effect in Scotland and newfoundland.

Evans,

Your clear, organized thinking continues to impress me.

What about anchor (dragging) alarms? Leaving vessel unattended? Or are you saying the BIG anchor does away with the need?
Thanks, yes, I should give some thoughts to alarms. Mostly I leave the plotter on, putting down track points every 1 seconds, and can see if/when we are dragging way before the alarm goes off.

Nice presentation. Don't know if you want to spend any time on ground tackle, but beer fueled cockpit anchoring discussions always include differences of opinions on the merits of using an anchor swivel in your ground tackle. ie. weak point versus anchor chain kinks from swinging with tide over some period of time.
Hmmm . . . . . are you pro or con to swivels? I am indifferent. We don't use one, after having one (a high end model) almost pull apart in hurricane Linny, but I don't really feel strongly pro or con. Do you think its an important enough issue to deserve some of the limited space/time?

Good stuff. Maybe add:

-Tides: Water depth and current direction to the "pick a good spot"

-Kellets: Work great to minimize swing and let you sleep easier since it really quiets down the ride

-Bridals: Minimize swing, including on a side-tie shore line, you can then use a single shore line and make a bridal ~1 boat length out and tie it to bow and stern instead of a complete 4 square tie

-Butterfly sail or other draggy sail from the stern to reduce swing

-Carry some rock climbing hardware like cams or jam nuts for grabbing a rock wall in a fjord
All interesting points, but I don't/have not used any of them. I guess the question is do you rate any of these as important enough to displace/cut down any of the other content?

Have you, or someone you know first hand, actually used cams/jam nuts that way? I don't remember seeing cracks that would suit, but that may just be because I was not looking. How strong is that hardware - could it hold a 20 ton boat with 40 kts gusts? I can see it as a low cost (space and $) way to add options . . . . but only if it really works.

I have wondered if I should add some comments on reducing rolling/swinging - stern anchors, and bridles and flopper stoppers, etc - but we Mostly don't do any of that (have very very occasionally used a stern anchor to point the boat into the swell).

 
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estarzinger

Super Anarchist
7,624
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What about anchoring in a spot where it is known that there are snags. Tripping line to a float versus tripping line tied to the main rode with breakable ties.

In the days when we were allowed to anchor in Elizabeth harbour Antigua the old hurricane chains were always a worry.
Trip lines . . . . we used to use a lot but have mostly stopped. Although we could have used one in south Georgia when we got the anchor trapped in a sunken ship mooring buoy. I will see if I can slide that in somewhere.

 

estarzinger

Super Anarchist
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^^ OK I wedged in comments on trip lines, anchor alarms, and climbing hardware

But I would like someone to confirm that the climbing cams are #1 actually strong enough for this sort of application, and #2 that there are (relatively frequently) cracks appropriate for them in these sorts of rocky high latitude anchorages

 

MR.CLEAN

Moderator
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when you're done with it evans do you think i could put it on the front page? can see pros and cons of that too...

 

Point Break

Super Anarchist
26,296
3,952
Long Beach, California
Thanks for the suggestions . . . . .

Do you think though that the shore tie will be useful for many people? Where do/can you use it?
For low latitudes I agree it's generally not so useful, however this audience is (most of them) going high latitude, and its a useful trick to have in the bag both in the PNW and in Patagonia. We also used it to good effect in Scotland and newfoundland.

>Evans,

Your clear, organized thinking continues to impress me.

What about anchor (dragging) alarms? Leaving vessel unattended? Or are you saying the BIG anchor does away with the need?
Thanks, yes, I should give some thoughts to alarms. Mostly I leave the plotter on, putting down track points every 1 seconds, and can see if/when we are dragging way before the alarm goes off.

Nice presentation. Don't know if you want to spend any time on ground tackle, but beer fueled cockpit anchoring discussions always include differences of opinions on the merits of using an anchor swivel in your ground tackle. ie. weak point versus anchor chain kinks from swinging with tide over some period of time.
Hmmm . . . . . are you pro or con to swivels? I am indifferent. We don't use one, after having one (a high end model) almost pull apart in hurricane Linny, but I don't really feel strongly pro or con. Do you think its an important enough issue to deserve some of the limited space/time?

Good stuff. Maybe add:

-Tides: Water depth and current direction to the "pick a good spot"

-Kellets: Work great to minimize swing and let you sleep easier since it really quiets down the ride

-Bridals: Minimize swing, including on a side-tie shore line, you can then use a single shore line and make a bridal ~1 boat length out and tie it to bow and stern instead of a complete 4 square tie

-Butterfly sail or other draggy sail from the stern to reduce swing

-Carry some rock climbing hardware like cams or jam nuts for grabbing a rock wall in a fjord
All interesting points, but I don't/have not used any of them. I guess the question is do you rate any of these as important enough to displace/cut down any of the other content?

Have you, or someone you know first hand, actually used cams/jam nuts that way? I don't remember seeing cracks that would suit, but that may just be because I was not looking. How strong is that hardware - could it hold a 20 ton boat with 40 kts gusts? I can see it as a low cost (space and $) way to add options . . . . but only if it really works.

I have wondered if I should add some comments on reducing rolling/swinging - stern anchors, and bridles and flopper stoppers, etc - but we Mostly don't do any of that (have very very occasionally used a stern anchor to point the boat into the swell).

I am largely indifferent as well. I have one, and my ground tackle has never failed (however I've never been anchored in really challenging weather) but I've read some articles critical of swivels and it does come up in discussion about ground tackle configurations. Can't say whether its important enough as that would be audience driven. I mean if its an experienced group they probably have already formed their opinions and aren't likely to change. If its someone getting set up or redoing their ground tackle it could be a question. Looks like most of your subject is how not with what..............

 

estarzinger

Super Anarchist
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^^ Hi clean . . . . it's a pro bono effort on my part, and I have already made it 'public', so you are welcome to post on FP if you want. I am continually updating the copy that is linked to in the OP . . . . so that will always be a live/current link.

 

olaf hart

Super Anarchist
I enjoyed the presentation.

You might want to involve the audience by asking them to guess the location of the anchorages in the pics. The pics really reinforce your credibility as well.

I suspect there will be some discussion on your advice on scope.

One trick on soft mud, the sort in river and creek mouths which tends to let go, let the anchor settle for at least half an hour before setting it.

 

estarzinger

Super Anarchist
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1,009
I suspect there will be some discussion on your advice on scope.
That's certainly politely stated . . . . are you sure you belong here :)

It is in fact what we do (scope wise).

Do you think there "will be discussion" on 3:1, or only on 2:1?

I agree that 2:1 is tricky, but it is also very useful to wedge in small places.

 

estarzinger

Super Anarchist
7,624
1,009
^^ Yes, and I am assuming the audience is also already using all chain, but I will ask that among a number of questions at the start of the presentation to help me better know who I am talking to (all I know right now is what type of boats they have and that they have signed up for a high latitude round the world rally).

 




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