Any good reading suggestions - Not just sailing

Captain Ketamine

Anarchist
558
340
Perth WA
If you have never read The Count of Monte Christi, it’s one of the great tales of betrayal and revenge in the context of post Bonaparte France.
I suggest you read it slowly, savour with a nice glass of Cognac. Perhaps get yourself a flintlock pistol to get into the mood and take pot shots at stray. Pedersoli do a very fine and accurate Le Page in a variety of calibres, smooth bore for continent duels or rifled for the range.
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boomer

Super Anarchist
16,753
1,779
PNW
Then there’s Blitzed. If you’ve not read it , it’s a very good account of the use of methylamphetamine in Germany before and during WW2. Not just as a stimulant because of lack of caffeine, but as a tactical agent. Also Hitlers dodgy doctor got him addicted to the stuff.

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Speed and amphetamines were used by both sides in WW II.





Captain James Cook, a story like biography of Cook from childhood to early day in the Royal Navy, and his three expeditions by Richard Hough is captivating and a real page turner.


I read a lot of WW II history again, and mostly books of the Air War in Europe and the South Pacific after breaking my left leg in the early 80s. I had the "Thousand Mile War" and it was the last book of a box of WW II books given to me by my old friend Skip Willson, but didn't think it would interesting, with a lot of fog and nasty weather. It was that and much more and another book that was hard to put down from start to finish and apparently saved the best WW II book till the end.


Drilling, building and installing a water system in Buna, Oro Province, Papua New Guinea I discovered a long drawn out fight between the ground forces of Australia, the US Army (including the US Army Air Force), and the Japanese ground forces, happened there in WW II.
Bloody Buna was another captivating read.


Battle of Buna–Gona
 
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Captain Ketamine

Anarchist
558
340
Perth WA
Speed and amphetamines were used by both sides in WW II.





Captain James Cook, a story like biography of Cook from childhood to early day in the Royal Navy, and his three expeditions by Richard Hough is captivating and a real page turner.


I read a lot of WW II history again, and mostly books of the Air War in Europe and the South Pacific after breaking my left leg in the early 80s. I had the "Thousand Mile War" and it was the last book of a box of WW II books given to me by my old friend Skip Willson, but didn't think it would interesting, with a lot of fog and nasty weather. It was that and much more and another book that was hard to put down from start to finish and apparently saved the best WW II book till the end.


Drilling, building and installing a water system in Buna, Oro Province, Papua New Guinea I discovered a long drawn out fight between the ground forces of Australia, the US Army (including the US Army Air Force), and the Japanese ground forces, happened there in WW II.
Bloody Buna was another captivating read.

Yes I gather that the longer duration of effect of the methylamphetamine was a hindrance to the Germans in North Africa they would awake for prolonged periods and prone to significant fatigue when it wore off. The allies using Benzedrine with shorter duration were supposedly able to get sleep recover. It’s in the book somewhere, but I need to find the citation. Thanks for the linkS.
 
Though many have read Tom Clancy's Jack Ryan series - recommended for those who haven't read them.

Jack Ryan Reading Order
I'm re-reading "A Clear and Present Danger" currently. I had re-read "The Hunt for Red October" last year or so. Most Tom Clancy novels build up slow with a lot of character and plot development, then it's like he lights the fuse partway through. so if you can get through the first third of the book it gets hard to put down.
 

gptyk

Anarchist
785
441
California
I didn't know of that one. I've been re-reading my old collection lately. Not just SK but also Clive Barker, Dean Koontz, Robert Jordan and others.
It's King's latest. It's good.

Based on your list, I'll assume you're aware of Dan Simmons. Prayers to Broken Stones is an awesome collection of shorts. I loved Hyperion but the series dragged a bit in the last three books.
 

pbd

Super Anarchist
1,361
298
Ca
If you have never read The Count of Monte Christi, it’s one of the great tales of betrayal and revenge in the context of post Bonaparte France.
I suggest you read it slowly, savour with a nice glass of Cognac. Perhaps get yourself a flintlock pistol to get into the mood and take pot shots at stray. Pedersoli do a very fine and accurate Le Page in a variety of calibres, smooth bore for continent duels or rifled for the range.
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I'm about 1/2 through TCOMC. Great story but I'm struggling with the pacing. Seems like every scene reads about twice as long as it needs to.

Although it sounds like I'm complaining I'm really enjoying the trip. Maybe need to add cognac.
 

Jules

Super Anarchist
8,676
3,461
Punta Gorda
Some of my timeless favorites:
Fiction
Shibumi by Trevanian - spelunking assassin
The Shipkiller - Justin Scott - guy gets pissed at a tanked for running down his boat and seeks revenge, in a Swan.
A Land Remembered - Patrick D. Smith - Florida settlers over about 100 years
Anything by Michael Connelly - legal, detective. LA region

NF
Three Mile Swim Club - poor kids in Hawaii go on to set Olympic records
Boys in a Boat - Washington rowing crew works their ass off to make the 1936 Olympics
Isaac's Storm - dawn of NWS cuts its teeth during the 1900 Galveston hurricane

Consistently good authors:
Michael Connelly
Daniel Silva
Erick Larson
Hampton Sides
David McCullough
Daniel James Brown
Ben McIntyre
 

Steam Flyer

Sophisticated Yet Humble
45,603
10,279
Eastern NC
If you have never read The Count of Monte Christi, it’s one of the great tales of betrayal and revenge in the context of post Bonaparte France.
I suggest you read it slowly, savour with a nice glass of Cognac. Perhaps get yourself a flintlock pistol to get into the mood and take pot shots at stray. Pedersoli do a very fine and accurate Le Page in a variety of calibres, smooth bore for continent duels or rifled for the range.
View attachment 557238
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I'm about 1/2 through TCOMC. Great story but I'm struggling with the pacing. Seems like every scene reads about twice as long as it needs to.

Although it sounds like I'm complaining I'm really enjoying the trip. Maybe need to add cognac.

Sabatini's 'Scaramouche' is a bit more fast paced, perhaps a bit more melodrama, not as long.

Cognac, yes!

One thing to remember about the classic novels, life was a LOT more slow-paced back then. The over riding skill of the authors was in describing things their readers were unfamiliar with, but would be interested in. Were the bosses on the sconces bolted to the wall or set in prongs? What color were the tassels on the tapestry? etc etc etc. They were not used to seeing photos, much less videos, so it all has to come thru the words.
 
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