Anybody cruising large tris in this place?

Rasputin22

Rasputin22
13,915
3,470
Thanks for that. Must be a new owner.
I think so since I heard from a guy in Culebra that Patterson had been legally blind for some time but still sailed on occasion. Eventually his failing eyesight and age led to him selling the tri. Great boat BTW, wonder what the selling price was.

 

jdazey

Member
459
142
Kingston, WA
Asking price on sailboatlistings was $240K. I didn't get any response to an inquiry I sent. Anyway, it looked like a nice custom performance/cruising tri.

 

Wess

Super Anarchist
We are presently circumnavigating in a Farrier F36/39

I am 6'5" tall and my wife 5'8".  I can stand in the main salon, galley, and shower, my wife can stand up everywhere except the aft cabin.

An F31 will sail past us in calm water and we will do a horizon line job on it offshore. In heavily loaded cruising mode, she'll turn in 200 mile days and we've seen one 300+ mile day upwind sailing. 

I would beg to differ with Wess on the issue of 'home builds', ours is better built than any production boat and so was the F9a "Red Shift" . It's all about the builder.

View attachment 442629
Hey, sorry for the delay to respond (was having an off line conversation with Three) and if my comment was misunderstood.  Like yours (great photo BTW) I know a number of high quality Farrier home builds (I am guessing we both know many really poor ones as well) - Greg Carter's F36/39 cruising Baha is another example of a great build out there doing that!  My point was about the challenges of getting insurance on the Farrier home builds.  That has turned into an issue for many who don't have an established carrier and even for some who do.

 
that's damn impressive
yes... we were blown away by that one too, never came close to 300 before. Our three and a half day average was 243 miles/day and the first 12 hours were in very light head winds in the Cook Straight, we even motored for a bit when the wind dropped below 2kn.

An 'overloaded' or as others have put it: "customer dictated irrelevant crap" filled Farrier F36 might need a gale to get going like this but she is rock solid in 30-40 knots and is a pleasure for either my wife or I to sail in these conditions alone. 40-45 knots ALWAYS brings huge smiles to my wife's lips. Trimarans can be truly awesome cruising boats off-shore

 
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kinardly

Super Anarchist
yes... we were blown away by that one too, never came close to 300 before. Our three and a half day average was 243 miles/day and the first 12 hours were in very light head winds in the Cook Straight, we even motored for a bit when the wind dropped below 2kn.

An 'overloaded' or as others have put it: "customer dictated irrelevant crap" filled Farrier F36 might need a gale to get going like this but she is rock solid in 30-40 knots and is a pleasure for either my wife or I to sail in these conditions alone. 40-45 knots ALWAYS brings huge smiles to my wife's lips. Trimarans can be truly awesome cruising boats off-shore
I have next to no multi cruising experience but saw somewhere that too much speed in a multi running before the wind was a problem. Something about not being able to round up into the wind to drop or reef sails so one has to hang on, skipping off waves and hope a lee shore isn’t up ahead. Is that just lead mine BS?

 

Dilligaf0220

Super Anarchist
1,906
185
Not The Caribbean
 They seem to do pretty well in the ARC, so must go pretty well off wind (for a loaded up cruising boat) and probably motor up wind as well as most trawlers, with a lot less rolling. So not my cup of tea, or probably a pretty good match for some people's uses (now that they seem to have resolved the build issues)
The Neel that was 1st OA in the ARC was a factory turbo'd ringer, with a race crew, rotating carbon mast & dagger board you don't see on the production boats.

 

Jackett

Member
137
76
UK
The Neel that was 1st OA in the ARC was a factory turbo'd ringer, with a race crew, rotating carbon mast & dagger board you don't see on the production boats.
Agreed. But got 3rd and 9th in the 2020 multihull division. So knowing nothing about the crews or the other boats in the class, I'd assume this would suggest that they weren't total dogs. Plus yachting journalists, who get to sell lots of different vessels, generally comment on performance and feel being better that the average cruising catamaran. Yes, they may have been bribed, but I assume the production cat builders can pay more in bribes. 

 

kinardly

Super Anarchist
Agreed. But got 3rd and 9th in the 2020 multihull division. So knowing nothing about the crews or the other boats in the class, I'd assume this would suggest that they weren't total dogs. Plus yachting journalists, who get to sell lots of different vessels, generally comment on performance and feel being better that the average cruising catamaran. Yes, they may have been bribed, but I assume the production cat builders can pay more in bribes. 
I recall looking at a cruising cat that had completed the ARC and then cruised through the canal to SD about thirty years ago and asking the skipper's wife how they adjusted leech tension on the self tacking jib. She had absolutely no idea what I was talking about.

 

Jackett

Member
137
76
UK
I recall looking at a cruising cat that had completed the ARC and then cruised through the canal to SD about thirty years ago and asking the skipper's wife how they adjusted leech tension on the self tacking jib. She had absolutely no idea what I was talking about.
My wife has sailed with me on a circumnavigation of the UK, and a few trips to the Baltic. She can stand watch, reef in a storm with waves washing the deck, fly a spinnaker and pick me up it'd I go overboard (well, she can pick up a fender tied to a bucket, luckily not tried in anger yet). But all her the same question and you'd get a blank look. 

Most of the couple's in the ARC are probably the same (from what I've read, many are late you sailing and doing the ARC for reassurance compared to going it alone). But if all the crews are similar, the comparison of the different vessels sailing ability for a typical cruising crew stands. 

 

ChrisJD

Member
255
172
Boston, MA
Likely not what this board had in mind, but I saw this in Boston Harbor today from my office window, and at the very least I'm curious if anyone knows what it is. It kinda looks like the answer to the question, "What would happen if you took a Fountaine Pajot and added another one?"

Large Tri.jpg
 

kent_island_sailor

Super Anarchist
27,268
5,175
Kent Island!
That thing defeats the purpose. If you want condo living just get a big cat. Tris are all about sacrificing room for speed. I have sailed a tri at over 20 knots with one hand on the tiller and no one really hanging on tight, THAT is why you get them ;)
 

ChrisJD

Member
255
172
Boston, MA
No argument there. I can't imagine it would be any more spacious than a cat, given how narrow the hulls would have to be, and it would probably be slower, heavier, and have a choppier ride, too. I'm honestly trying to figure out the upside.
 

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