Anyone recognize this rescue?

fastyacht

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SloopJonB

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Great Wet North
I thought the heavy weather tactic for schooners was to have the foresail up between the masts - the fishing fleet called it being in foresail harbour.
 

MR.CLEAN

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I thought the heavy weather tactic for schooners was to have the foresail up between the masts - the fishing fleet called it being in foresail harbour.
Depends on the location of the masts and the sail inventory, as well as which way you wanna drift and how fast. The nice thing about having access to all those short sails is that it's always possible to heave to without too much effort.
 

veni vidi vici

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Heaving to is a very comfortable set up for repairs , taking some time to regroup or burning time.
 

P_Wop

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The ketch tactic is a storm jib on the inner forestay and a mizzen with three reefs in it. Swan 65, anyway, in the days (thankfully) before furlers. Just big bronze hanks. The boat would heave-to very nicely with that rig when you wanted a bit of a rest to cook dinner.
 

P_Wop

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Every time I watch USCG rescue at work it sends quivers down my spine. Damn, they are competent at their job.
The helicopter squadron at Culdrose in Cornwall are pretty good too. They got a serious workout in the 1979 Fastnet, hauling people off boats and out of liferafts in 60 knots, at night.

I knew one of the pilots well, and he said he had to go up and down twenty feet to time the waves coming in so he didn't dunk his winchman. He said the other problem was that the Westland Wessex helicopter had air intakes low on the nose, and he had to fly higher than he's like as spray was getting into the engines.

They had a wild party afterwards and had made up some great T-shirts. On the back was "SUPPORT YOUR LOCAL SAR SQUADRON. GET LOST."
 

veni vidi vici

Omne quod audimus est opinio, non res. Omnia videm
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Every time I watch USCG rescue at work it sends quivers down my spine. Damn, they are competent at their job.
So are the other branches
Train train train then execute
Display of the real America , the scale of this event is just now coming into focus.
 

Russell Brown

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Port Townsend WA
My dad took my brother and I to see Barlovento in Santa Cruz when I was around 6 years old. My dad was pretty pumped to see it and introduced it to us as a "real boat", even though he wasn't a monohull guy.
I remember the life rings with the name of the boat on them and all of the crew in matching outfits and hats.
About 40 years later I watched Barlovento and another schooner working upwind in big breeze from a high bluff, which left another impression. On the local racecourse that boat was just raw power. I've seen a lot of schooners around here, but nothing held a candle to Barlovento. The long-time owner was a bit of a menace when racing and he wasn't exactly good for the boat. No surprise that it was lost. It wan't sound and the crew wasn't up to the task.
 

kiwin

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Auckland
I spent 36 hours hove to under staysail and 3 reefs just a few weeks ago. The first time in 20 years at least. Horrible conditions. Life was much more pleasant for while hove to. The downside is the 86 miles we did going the wrong way....
 

robvon

New member
Russel, the owner that I believe you're referring to sold Barlovento about 10 years ago. She was moved from Paulsbo to Sydney (Vancouver Isle) for an extensive refit by a very respectable yard for her new (European?) owner. I believe she was recovered after this episode and was seen in Puget Sound area more recently. Kim B likely has more accurate info.
 

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