Astronomy Anarchy

nolatom

Super Anarchist
3,521
558
New Orleans
"Last Sliver" Moon and Venus for you earlybirds (or really latebirds).

You will need to out up early, just before first light (so around 5am, sorry) the next two mornings (Wednesday and Thurs) and you'll need a clear view low in the East.

If you can do all this and have clear sky, the almost-gone crescent Moon and very bright Venus will be near each other, pretty sight. They will be visible into morning twilight as they rise, then lost in the daylight as the Sun chases them up.

 

mainsheetsister

Super Anarchist
New Moon on July 26.

The Moon will be directly between the Earth and the Sun and will not be visible from Earth.

This phase occurs at 22:42 UTC.

This is the best time of the month to observe faint objects such as galaxies and star clusters because there is no moonlight to interfere.

 

Bump-n-Grind

Get off my lawn.
14,114
2,892
Chesapeake Bay/Vail
New Moon on July 26.

The Moon will be directly between the Earth and the Sun and will not be visible from Earth.

This phase occurs at 22:42 UTC.

This is the best time of the month to observe faint objects such as galaxies and star clusters because there is no moonlight to interfere.
Hope the sky's clear, I been meaning to drag my scope out in the yard!!

 

mainsheetsister

Super Anarchist
Delta Aquarids Meteor Shower on July 28-29.

The Delta Aquarids is an average shower that can produce up to 20 meteors per hour at its peak.

It is produced by debris left behind by comets Marsden and Kracht.

The shower runs annually from July 12 to August 23.

It peaks this year on the night of July 28 and morning of July 29.

This should be a great year for this shower because the thin crescent moon will set early in the evening leaving dark skies for what should a good show.

Best viewing will be from a dark location after midnight.

Meteors will radiate from the constellation Aquarius, but can appear anywhere in the sky.

 

mainsheetsister

Super Anarchist
Full Moon on August 10.

The Moon will be directly opposite the Earth from the Sun and will be fully illuminated as seen from Earth.

This phase occurs at 18:09 UTC.

When the Moon is full, it rises at sunset, is directly overhead at midnight, and sets at sunrise.

This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Full Sturgeon Moon because the large sturgeon fish of the Great Lakes and other major lakes were more easily caught at this time of year.

This moon has also been known as the Green Corn Moon and the Grain Moon.

The Moon is at perigee due to the elliptical shape of its orbit, making it the closest and largest full Moon of the year, an annual event that has come to be known as a "supermoon" by the media.

The truth is that it is only slightly larger and brighter than normal and most people are not really able to tell the difference.

 

mainsheetsister

Super Anarchist
Perseids Meteor Shower on August 12-13.

The Perseids is one of the best meteor showers to observe, producing up to 60 meteors per hour at its peak.

It is produced by comet Swift-Tuttle, which was discovered in 1862.

The Perseids are famous for producing a large number of bright meteors.

The shower runs annually from July 17 to August 24.

It peaks this year on the night of August 12 and the morning of August 13.

The waning gibbous moon will block out some of the meteors this year, but the Perseids are so bright and numerous that it should still be a good show.

Best viewing will be from a dark location after midnight.

Meteors will radiate from the constellation Perseus, but can appear anywhere in the sky.

 

mainsheetsister

Super Anarchist
Conjunction of Venus and Jupiter on August 18

Conjunctions are rare events where two or more objects will appear extremely close together in the night sky.

The two bright planets will come unusually close to each other, only a quarter of a degree, in the early morning sky.

Also, the beehive cluster in the constellation Cancer will be only 1 degree away.

This rare, double-planet event is definitely one not to miss.

Look for the bright planets in the east just before sunrise.




 
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mainsheetsister

Super Anarchist
New Moon on August 25.

When the Moon is new, it rises as the sun rises, is directly overhead at midday, and sets as the sun goes down.

The Moon will be directly between the Earth and the Sun and will not be visible from Earth.

The Moon will be in the sky during the daylight hours, but it will not be visible from Earth because the illuminated side of the moon will be facing away from Earth.

This phase occurs at 14:13 UTC.

This is the best time of the month to observe faint objects such as galaxies and star clusters because there is no moonlight to interfere.
 

mainsheetsister

Super Anarchist

mainsheetsister

Super Anarchist
Neptune at Opposition on August 29.

The blue giant planet will be at its closest approach to Earth and its face will be fully illuminated by the Sun.

When a planet is at opposition, it can be seen directly overhead at midnight, and if a line were drawn between that planet and the Sun, Earth would be a point on the line.

This is the best time to view and photograph Neptune.

Due to its extreme distance from Earth, it will only appear as a tiny blue dot in all but the most powerful telescopes.

 

mainsheetsister

Super Anarchist
Full Moon on September 8-9.

The Moon will be directly opposite the Earth from the Sun and will be fully illuminated as seen from Earth.

This phase occurs at 01:38 UTC.

When the Moon is full, it rises at sunset, is directly overhead at midnight, and sets as the sun rises.

This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Full Corn Moon because the corn is harvested around this time of year.

This moon is also known as the Harvest Moon.

The Harvest Moon is the full moon that occurs closest to the September equinox each year.

 

mainsheetsister

Super Anarchist
September Equinox on September 23.

The September equinox occurs at 02:29 UTC.

The Sun will shine directly on the equator and there will be nearly equal amounts of day and night throughout the world.

This is also the first day of fall (autumnal equinox) in the Northern Hemisphere and the first day of spring (vernal equinox) in the Southern Hemisphere.

 
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