Astronomy Anarchy

mainsheetsister

Super Anarchist
Uranus at Opposition on October 3.

The blue-green planet will be at its closest approach to Earth and its face will be fully illuminated by the Sun.

This is the best time to view Uranus.

Uranus is just over 18 au from Earth. Due to its distance, it will only appear as a tiny blue-green dot in all but the most powerful telescopes.

And yes, you can giggle. I said Uranus.

 

mainsheetsister

Super Anarchist
Draconids Meteor Shower on October 7-8

The Draconids is a minor meteor shower producing only about 10 meteors per hour.

It is produced by dust grains left behind by comet 21P Giacobini-Zinner, which was first discovered in 1900.

The shower runs annually from October 6-10 and peaks this year on the the night of the 7th and morning of the 8th.

The thin crescent moon will set early in the evening leaving dark skies for optimal observing.

Best viewing will be just after midnight from a dark location far away from city lights.

Meteors will radiate from the constellation Draco, but can appear anywhere in the sky.

 

mainsheetsister

Super Anarchist
Mercury at Greatest Eastern Elongation on October 9.

The planet Mercury will be at its furthest angle from the Sun, known as greatest elongation.

It will be at its highest point in the night sky after sunset.

This is the best time to try to view Mercury since it stays so close to the Sun and doesn't usually climb very high above the horizon.

 

mainsheetsister

Super Anarchist
Full Moon and Penumbral Lunar Eclipse on October 18.

The Moon will be directly opposite the Earth from the Sun and will be fully illuminated as seen from Earth.

This phase occurs at 23:38 UTC.

This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Full Hunters Moon because at this time of year the leaves are falling and the game is fat and ready to hunt. This moon has also been known as the Travel Moon and the Blood Moon.

This will also be the smallest full moon of the year because it will be near apogee, its farthest point from the Earth.

A penumbral lunar eclipse occurs when the Moon passes through the Earth's partial shadow, or penumbra.

During this type of eclipse the Moon will darken slightly but not completely.

The eclipse will be visible throughout most of the world except for Australia and extreme eastern Siberia.

 

mainsheetsister

Super Anarchist
Orionids Meteor Shower peaks on October 21-22.

The Orionids is an average shower producing up to 20 meteors per hour at its peak.

It is produced by dust grains left behind by comet Halley, which has been known and observed since ancient times.

The shower runs annually from October 2 to November 7.

It peaks this year on the night of October 21 and the morning of October 22.

The waning gibbous moon will block some of the meteors this year, but the Orionids tend to be fairly bright so it could still be a good show.

Best viewing will be from a dark location after midnight.

Meteors will radiate from the constellation Orion, but can appear anywhere in the sky.

 

nolatom

Super Anarchist
3,572
586
New Orleans
While you are gazing at Orionids, don't ignore the goodies in the rest of the sky..

The predawn sky is dark pretty late these last days of Daylight Savings time, and worth a look straight up.

Moon and very bright Jupiter next to each other. And Orion nearby, so bright Sirius and Jupiter are the "bright lights" with the other "pretty bright" stars of Orion (Rigel, and "Beetlejuice" (Betelgeuse); and then Procyon, Capella, Castor and Pollux, and Aldebaran, all of them around Orion in a kind of circle.

Woo hoo, now you know 8 of the brightest stars. Of the 25 brightest, only about half are "up" at any given time, so this is a majority of them. you can now impress others with your star knowledge..

(tip: Orion's belt points "up" to Aldebaran, and "down" to Sirius, so you can locate them easily, and bullshit others about where the others are (Castor and Pollux are dimmer, and "twins" next to each other, leaving only Procyon and Capella, no one will know if you mix them up)

Right, Sis? You can win drink bets on this stuff (is that a bright idea at 5am?)

 
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nolatom

Super Anarchist
3,572
586
New Orleans
Yeah, for the "normal" sky without meteors or comets, this is like the grand finale at a fireworks display, all the best stuff at once.

 

mainsheetsister

Super Anarchist
New Moon and Solar Eclipse on November 3.

The Moon will be directly between the Earth and the Sun and will not be visible from Earth.

This phase occurs at 12:50 UTC.

This is the best time of the month to observe faint objects such as galaxies and star clusters because there is no moonlight to interfere.

A hybrid solar eclipse occurs when the Moon is almost too close to the Earth to completely block the Sun.

This type of eclipse will appear as a total eclipse to some parts of the world and will appear annular to others.

The eclipse path will begin in the Atlantic Ocean off the eastern coast of the United States and move east across the Atlantic and across central Africa.

NASA Map and Eclipse Information

 

gina

Super Anarchist
1,999
0
Dear Mr Foxtrot,

Yes, I like when it is sunny and 70, and although I may browse in PA, I have no idea why that could be Bush's fault.

And shouldn't you be in bed so you can get up at 3:45 to watch that Cali solar eclipse? :p

Best,

gina

 

Charlie Foxtrot

Super Anarchist
4,810
690
Floriduh
Dear Ms. Gina, I erred.

The last line was meant as a wry general throw-away comment - not as a challenge to you. In fact, using your post in the quote was intended only to reference the coming solar eclipse. However, my ham-handed post composition made it seem as anything but benign. The post was only supposed to comment at the possibility of a historic Maunder Minimum: something it abjectly failed at.

I am sincerely sorry for the miscommunication, and humbly beg your forgiveness.

Happy Observing! However - at 3:45 - I will be happily trying to out-snore my German Shepherds. :D

CF

 
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mainsheetsister

Super Anarchist
Taurids Meteor Shower on November 4-5.

The Taurids is a long-running minor meteor shower producing only about 5-10 meteors per hour.

It is unusual in that it consists of two separate streams. The first is produced by dust grains from Asteroid 2004 TG10. The second stream is produced by debris left behind by Comet 2P Encke.

The shower runs annually from September 7 to December 10. It peaks this year on the the night of November 4.

This is an excellent year because there will be no moonlight to spoil the show.

Best viewing will be just after midnight from a dark location far away from city lights.

Meteors will radiate from the constellation Taurus, but can appear anywhere in the sky.

 
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