Backing out in the surf.

NaptimeAgain

Super Anarchist
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Annapolis MD
What's the propulsion?  Guessing they have the engines running in neutral before getting off the trailer, though unclear how cooling would work there.  Hard to imagine that launching stern first into breaking surf before starting the engines is a good idea. Water jets?  Otherwise props are just digging beach.

 

Great White

Super Anarchist
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Bremerton, WA USA
I doubt that backing out thru the surf is the normal method of launching. Looks like the boat is tunnel drive with the props recessed  into tunnels in the boat bottom. This would protect the props for shallow water ops. It would make sense for a boat of this type would have external keel coolers instead of internal heat exchangers. Heat exchangers could just get clogged from the sand. With keel coolers, the engines could be started prior to launching.

 

Zonker

Super Anarchist
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Props in tunnels if it's like the Arun class lifeboats. No need for tunnels if its a waterjet.

Crazy Brits.  South Africans do this shit as well with small fishing boats. Other people use what is called "a harbour".  Yes, it was unintentional to back out. Boat was spun around in the surf.

Watching it my first thought was - you really need a big concrete block somewhere out there underwater with a clothesline/endless loop. Have a winch on shore at the other end, grab the closeline on a tether, and yank the boat out to sea. I'm sure there are technical reasons why such a system wouldn't work.

image.png

 

Dorado

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Backing out in the surf is the way it's done in the Cook Inlet, AK because you're trying to keep your props off the rocks. I skippered a 6-pack Halibut boat up there for a season in '92

Of course there is a limit to the size of surf you will launch in. However retrieving the boat thru the surf when the weather kicks up ( which is quite often) is do or die. I'm attaching a video of how NOT to do it.  This surf isn't exceptionally large either. Keep in mind the tidal current is anywhere from 2-4 knots sideways to the beach here.

I once towed a fellow skipper's boat in, in moderately rough conditions. When we got to the beach I set up a breasted tow with my port bow lashed to his starboard quarter. I will say we were all pretty well puckered up but we nailed it on the first shot and impressed the hell out of everybody. Wouldn't want to do that again though.

The boat at 5:00 does a decent job of it but but would be much better off with a slower approach, then line up and power onto the trailer at the last second. The guy after him is a wanker.




 
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White Lightnin'

Super Anarchist
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Anacortes, Wa
The landing craft barge I drive  has keel cooled engines. We have a beach we land on that can get a bit of fetch on a Northerly. If you don't have enough weight in the stern to keep the props from cavitating in the 2-4 seas, it can get.....sporty. The  trick is getting out far enough to be able to turn cleanly without ending up sideways. Not bad in 10-15, but over 20 knots and you find yourself holding your breath....

WL

 

Point Break

Super Anarchist
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Long Beach, California
NotTrueWind said:
that could have gone pear shaped quickly and you guys would have been posting snarky comments if it had.

Seems like they took an big risk unless they were off to make an actual assist.
We have an expression in the FD......”All really bad fires happen at night, at the intersection of 4 quad maps, in country you’ve never seen in daylight.” If you never train under difficult conditions, once in a while under REALLY difficult conditions, then when you actually have a rescue in those conditions you’ll have less chance of getting it right. “Make all your mistakes in training” is another maxim. When I was a beach guard in San Diego, on really big days, everyone was required to make a swim out and back in through the slot just south of the Children’s Pool, or out at Boomers, and sometimes the Cove and caves just north. When it’s game-time you’re gonna play like you train. 

While I’m sure they know WAY more than I do about launching in rough surf, I presume there is some judgement driven by experience that has an upper limit to when they’ll train. I certainly would not criticize them if things had gone south unless there was some egregious error we all could spot. Even then.......

 

Merrill Levi

Anarchist
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NaptimeAgain

Super Anarchist
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Annapolis MD
Mersey class lifeboat:
2 x Caterpillar 3208T marine diesel engines; 280hp each at 2,800rpm
The propellers and rudders lie in partial tunnels set into the hull. The tunnels, along with the main and two bilge keels, provide excellent protection from damage in shallow water and during beach recovery or slipway operations.

View attachment 318779

more info at https://rnli.org/what-we-do/lifeboats-and-stations/our-lifeboat-fleet/mersey-class-lifeboat
In this configuration they would be launching bow first.  Have they considered a double ended trailer, i.e. hitchable at both ends?  Then they could launch and retrieve bow first.

 

Merrill Levi

Anarchist
In this configuration they would be launching bow first.  Have they considered a double ended trailer, i.e. hitchable at both ends?  Then they could launch and retrieve bow first.
looks like the more modern version of that trailer was designed with your idea in mind, rather than double end the trailer (simple) they put a turntable on the trailer, cuz sand and salt are so passive on hydraulic gear:

RNLI_recovery.JPG

that image was taken from the following video - turn the sound off, narrated for kids. The recovery process starts at 4:30 where they drive the vessel bow on to a hard grounding, then bring the trailer to the boat & winch the boat on bow first.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nO1uRoqXxd4

 
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