Backstay pressure sensor?

Itsabimmerthing

Anarchist
770
11
Europe
I see Harken has added some pressure sensors to harken.com

https://www.harken.com/en/shop/pressure-transducers/

Could these be connected to their Integral backstay adjusters? Is there a "output" where this could be connected to?

 

mgs

canoeman
1,119
251
maine
I see Harken has added some pressure sensors to harken.com

https://www.harken.com/en/shop/pressure-transducers/

Could these be connected to their Integral backstay adjusters? Is there a "output" where this could be connected to?
You mean you want a gauge with that integral? What a novel concept.

the original harken integrals had gauges and the photo online at least looks like there is still the machined threads for it at the top, although I don’t know for certains.

the pressure transducer I saw online from harken had pipe thread on the end with wires sticking out the back. Is that what you were looking at? (Link didn’t work). The pressure transducers I’ve seen were teed off a run of hydraulic hose. 
 

it might be possible to plug that it to the integral but it wouldn’t look clean at all. A better option would be to get a load pin to put at the bottom of the integral toggle. 
 

other options include, getting an integral with a gauge, going for a hydraulic system with a pump and panel and cylinder, or ditching the hydraulics completely 

 
Tons to choose from usually 4-20ma or 0-10v will need a analog input somewhere to display filter and scale. As Above you can get in just about any configuration and porting.  Transducers generally get installed like a pressure gauge ideally you would want SAE or BSPP oring port with hydraulics but NPT will work. Can be located anywhere in the P run between pump and cylinder.  Have to make sure range exceeds working pressure as they do not take abuse at all, if you over pressure it will ruin it.  Do a search on automation direct for lower cost hardware and display.  If the run is JIC hoses you can get branch T's specific for gauge ports. Look on Parkers site for fittings. If you aren't worried about cost Danfoss is top end.  If you have a engine monitor like Actisense may be able to bring into a open port to get on n2k or I think some of the BG stuff has configurable analog inputs.

 
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RImike

Super Anarchist
1,031
124
Newport RI
Just an FYI, most pressure sensors work on a 0-10V signal. The B&H H5000 processor analog input 1, 2, 3&4 only take a 0-5 volts reference so you will need to make a voltage divider.

Also for some reason that on certain pages the window value on the screen can only be 3 digits I believe (it was a few years back) and thus the value of pressure was in bars and not PSI so that was a minor customer annoyance. I think in the end we ended up creating an arbitrary 1-10 scale system which meant nothing to the customer other that when going up wind to set it to 7 and when not in use set it to 3 (or something like that). 

 
0-10v used to be super common in marine stuff, but I think Ma are a little more robust and less prone to issues.  Most process stuff we use now is all 4-20ma. You can actually get simple signal conditioners.  About the size of a Din single contact breaker.  Can go Ma to V or vice versa.  Problem with boats is 12v not being super common in process  but 24 is.

 

b393capt

Anarchist
We have a stick on out backstay cylinder with lines marked across the stick to provide a visual reference 0 to 13. No logging, but  works wireless and takes up no space on our instrument displays.

 

El Borracho

Verified User
6,660
2,635
Pacific Rim
It would be interesting to see what if any variance there was under sail at the physical marks, probably not a lot.  Definitely the kiss way to go.
There is nothing particularly accurate about the hydraulic pressure reading vs. headstay tension*. So both methods need frequent 'calibration' to relate the readings to sailing performance.

* Much of the backstay tension goes into mast bend which is in turn dependent on shroud adjustment, runners, mainsail shape and trim...all those things affect the headstay too...so one is back to eyeballing the sails directly...

Glancing at the stick is quick and reliable (except for that useless idle loudmouth standing there that tends to block the trimmers view...)

 
There is nothing particularly accurate about the hydraulic pressure reading vs. headstay tension*. So both methods need frequent 'calibration' to relate the readings to sailing performance.

* Much of the backstay tension goes into mast bend which is in turn dependent on shroud adjustment, runners, mainsail shape and trim...all those things affect the headstay too...so one is back to eyeballing the sails directly...

Glancing at the stick is quick and reliable (except for that useless idle loudmouth standing there that tends to block the trimmers view...)
If you wanted to get really fancy you could put strain gauges on the mast..... That would be pretty exact.

 




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