best small cruiser

Ajax

Super Anarchist
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Edgewater, MD
Sure, I consider it to be cruising. I was thinking that the OP meant more blue-water stuff.

Some of the other boats you've posted are spartan, but have full or modified full keels, more protected rudders, that sort of thing. :)

Hell after learning more here, I wouldn't even recommend my own boat for blue water sailing and you know I look at the P30 through very rose-tinted glasses. Coastal and big Bay cruising, yes.

 

boomer

Super Anarchist
16,753
1,779
PNW
Sure, I consider it to be cruising. I was thinking that the OP meant more blue-water stuff.

Some of the other boats you've posted are spartan, but have full or modified full keels, more protected rudders, that sort of thing. :)

Hell after learning more here, I wouldn't even recommend my own boat for blue water sailing and you know I look at the P30 through very rose-tinted glasses. Coastal and big Bay cruising, yes.
Actually the Cal 25 and 28 sail fairly well and are easy on the crew. The Ranger 26 that I once had that was quite easy on the crew, had a balanced helm and a comfortable motion. Not sure I'd want to punch her into the Gulf Stream going to Bermuda, but there are those who have.

Ranger 26

http://thenetbenefit...ew_Ranger26.pdf

http://thenetbenefit...6_PS_Review.pdf

http://thenetbenefit...er26_Review.pdf

020a.jpg


 
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Steam Flyer

Sophisticated Yet Humble
45,606
10,282
Eastern NC
I really dislike the phrase "blue water cruiser." To my ear it sounds like a reference to toilet cleaning products. A boat is intended for open-ocean passagemaking or not... lots of shades of grey along that scale all the way down to 'calm lake daysailing.' The number of people who will actually cross an ocean under sail is so small that the number of boats in this category could/should be vanishingly small.

Another favorite of mine is Thomas Gilmer's BLUE MOON.

bluemoon-primary.jpg


As always, the question is "what do you want to DO with the boat" and the usual answer for all those heavy-ass full-keel boats is 'hang around the dock and impress people with how salty I am.'

A pilot cutter (BLUE MOON is actually a variant on the pilot cutter called a 'dandy') has enough veracity to get you out from under that shadow... as would a real schooner... or any Atkin design IMHO...

FB- Doug

 

boomer

Super Anarchist
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PNW
As always, the question is "what do you want to DO with the boat" and the usual answer for all those heavy-ass full-keel boats is 'hang around the dock and impress people with how salty I am.'
Depends on the owner.

In the previous marina to the one I'm in now, I would go out two to four times a week or more. A Pearson Triton and a Person Vanguard probably when out more then any of the others in the marina, and almost as much as I did at times.

In the marina I'm in now, there is one of those 18' Pitcairns that goes at a times more then any boat in the marina.

We also have a Columbia 29 whose owner takes his boat out more regularly then most. He's a long time owner of the boat, cares for her well and usually single hands.

Speaking of slow we also have a Gulf Pilothouse 30 that goes out just about every other weekend and regularly takes long cruises north for extended periods.

Down in Brownsville marina there is a fellow with a standard Gulf 30, who used to take his boat out regularly...not sure if he still does, Great White/ Dan would know for certain.

 
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Steam Flyer

Sophisticated Yet Humble
45,606
10,282
Eastern NC
As always, the question is "what do you want to DO with the boat" and the usual answer for all those heavy-ass full-keel boats is 'hang around the dock and impress people with how salty I am.'
Depends on the owner.

... ...
Agreed

Most marinas I know of, less than 10% of boats go out more than 10 times a year. Sailing clubs are slightly better but not much.

One thing I will say, a boat that is sturdy & well-sorted out can be used more easily and will get used more often than one which is temperamental and/or needs a lot of string-pulling. A downside which remains for full-keelers is that they are more difficult to handle around docks or in close quarters with other boats.

... ...

Speaking of slow we also have a Gulf Pilothouse 30 that goes out just about every other weekend and regularly takes long cruises north for extended periods.

... ...
Hah! Was that boat formerly named 'PNEUMA' owned by an elderly gentleman with a nice little dog? If so I believe he daysailed the boat pretty often. Can't be too many of those around.

FB- Doug

 

boomer

Super Anarchist
16,753
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PNW
He's been a life long sailor out of Kingston. A marine biologist who is a manager at one of the local salmon fish farms in Rich Passage. Not only does he sail the boat regularly, but believe it or not he's raced it and his previous boat for close to 20 years or more in our west sound events, as well as single handed events around the sound. He even sails the boat to her rating and has won his class sometimes.

The boats name is Alcyone and his name is Devon B.

Google "Alcyone Rawson 30"

http://www.wscyc.net/WSSA/index.htm

 
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Steam Flyer

Sophisticated Yet Humble
45,606
10,282
Eastern NC
He's been a life long sailor out of Kingston. A marine biologist who is a manager at one of the local salmon fish farms in Rich Passage. Not only does he sail the boat regularly, but believe it or not he's raced it and his previous boat for close to 20 years or more in our west sound events, as well as single handed events around the sound. He even sails the boat to her rating and has won his class sometimes.

The boats name is Alcyone and his name is Devon B.

Google "Alcyone Rawson 30"

http://www.wscyc.net/WSSA/index.htm
Sorry, thought you were talking about the Gulf Pilothouse 30

FB- Doug

 




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