better access to cabin lockers

gkny

Member
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26
I always find that I have to pull all of the cushion seat backs to be able to get access to under seats in the main cabin salon.  The problem is that all of the back and side seats are secured with velcro and they sit on top of the seat cushion.  You can't raise the seat without removing all of these cushions.  I was wondering if anyone has seen better arrangments.  I have considered putting a thin sheet of luan on a piano hinge and attaching the back cushions to this piece of luan.  Has anyone devised a better solution to improve access?  thanks!

 

Bristol-Cruiser

Super Anarchist
4,580
1,201
Great Lakes
What about putting doors in the vertical faces of the lockers? You could get most things in and out conveniently that way and still be able to go in from the top as needed.

 

toddster

Super Anarchist
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The Gorge
Seems like a model-specific issue.  Do the back cushions really need to go all the way down ?  Seems to me that your back only hits them near the top but YMMV.   I had to start over from scratch anyway, so I had no back cushions for a while, then made up a series of short ones. Though at one time I had considered a continuous "stripe" of back cushion all the way along the side.  

Here's the current iteration - not in love with the way this looks, but it's functional.  (I was trying to avoid velcro, but may have to go there after all.) But imagine that if instead of those doors, there was just continuous cushion all along. With a three-inch gap above the settee cushion. No interference.  

IMG_2534.jpg

 

toddster

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The Gorge
I like the bookends.  What are the clamps?
Is the Lagun table bracket adequately rigid?
The bookends are made from scraps of wood and alloy bicycle hub skewers. They're about eight or nine bucks a pair on amazon.  

I've been pleasantly surprised by the Lagun.  I think if you loaded it up with a heavier table it might get a little sketchy, but this one is fine.  It stays in place even when the boat is slamming through a pretty nasty chop.  I can eat, read, and type on a laptop without any wobble.  (Not while slamming through waves though...) I'll make another top with fold-out leaves one of these days and see how it goes.  Got flush hinges for it somewhere in the project box.  

 

steele

Super Anarchist
1,702
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Land of the locks
gkny, My boat came as you described form the factory. The problem is the seat cushions with the ply are heavier than you might think. If I have to keep them open for while I can hold them up with a gear tie, but for quick access I end up holding it open with one hand, or my forehead, while I grab what I want. It works but there must be a better way. A metal latch would be nice but my boat is not configured to make it work.

 

SloopJonB

Super Anarchist
67,108
11,546
Great Wet North
 (I was trying to avoid velcro, but may have to go there after all.)
Velcro still qualifies as a miracle product on boats IMO.

That cushion situation is a perfect use for it.

I had slippery dinette cushions on my last boat that would slide onto the sole on starboard tack. A $5 roll of stick on Velcro cured it.

Ish used it to stick a trim cover plate in place rather than screws or what not.

Lots of uses for it.

 

PaulK

Super Anarchist
Back cushions might not be needed at all if the angle of the seat back is right.  Fred Bingham, in his "Practical Yacht Joinery" suggests 10º.  Seats detailed in Ian Nicholson’s “Comfort in the Cruising Yacht” seem to use this angle as well.  This same idea applies to cockpit seat back/coamings.  Vertical backs are NOT comfortable. The ones in Toddster’s photo above don’t appear to be angled enough.  An increased angle would add to the amount of stowage behind the seat back, make the seat more comfortable, and perhaps remove the need for having any back cushions. 

 

toddster

Super Anarchist
4,179
964
The Gorge
Yeah, one reason that it's probably a model-specific issue. A picture of the OP's boat might help, though we are probably going far afield from his question.

 Also, if the settees are mummy-shaped - narrow at the foot and wide at the shoulder - the wide end can be so far back that it's impossible to recline comfortably.  Maybe a trade-off between comfortable sleeping or comfortable sitting.  This is especially crazy on the port side of my boat - the angle is so great that only a bit of the left side of your ribcage makes contact, unless you contort yourself into a sideways-crabbed position.  That's one reason why I got rid of the back cushions entirely in the first place. To some extent, they are irrelevant.  Also why the vertical back angle probably is irrelevant on this boat.    But the cushion does keep me from leaning so far back that my head knocks against the control panel.  Or cabinet, as the case may be.  

BTW, the settee backs are one of the details where the "as-built" is not quite the same as the drawings.  Makes me wonder whether it was just easier to build this way, or if there was some iterative process in the design.  

 

gkny

Member
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26
Thanks for all of your suggestions.  The design of the main cabin settee is pretty conventional.  There are two U shaped sections on each side of a folding table.  The long settees have a folding plywood lid.  The cushion extends underneath the cushions for the seat back and the sides.  To raise the lid to the rather large lockers, you have to remove four cushions and stack them on the other side.  I was trying to see if there was a way to reduce the number of cushions that needed to be removed and stored elsewhere to gain access.  I have seen this kind of design in quite a few boats and it is sort of inconvenient.

If the cushions were older or in worse shape, I would be tempted to make the seat backs extend all the way to the plywood and have the seat cushion butt up against them.  If the lid was hinged where the seat butted up against the seat backs then maybe you could raise it enough to get fairly quick access.

 
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