Blades/knives. Whatcha got

Point Break

Super Anarchist
26,284
3,945
Long Beach, California
:blink:

142E8B9F-7D82-4D88-BBAD-319ED79EFAF6.jpeg

 

Charlie Foxtrot

Super Anarchist
4,881
736
Floriduh
Looks like that guy ran into a couple of doorknobs backstage courtesy of security.
There's of video of Security taking the foo' to the back of the band shell and beating the crap out of him.  That's Entertainment!

And I don't think his arm is meant to bend that way.

 
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mikewof

mikewof
45,639
1,209
Since reading this thread, I decided to start using my Opinel #7 trekking knife.

I always assumed it was a French "brie and bread" knife, looks like this one ... Screen Shot 2022-05-12 at 7.22.08 PM.png

very sharp, holds an edge, but I assumed too lightweight for regular use other than cutting stuff at a picnic.

I just stuck it in my pocket and used it all the time, whittling sticks, cutting wire insulation, things like that. Turns out it's actually a pretty durable knife! Deceptively strong because it is so lightweight, I often forget I even have it in my pocket.

 

Grizz

Beats the crap out of me
503
221
Northport, NY
So- how do you keep them sharp? For the past few years I've been using the EdgePro Apex system, with the standard waterstones and a few higher-end after-market ones. This handles all of my knives, large and small. I used to do it all freehand, but never got the same results, especially with my large kitchen knives. Not cheap, but my wife was paying attention while I was dropping hints, so it was a birthday gift.

I've since bought them for both of my sons. Well worth it.

edgepro.jpg

 

blunderfull

Super Anarchist
Since reading this thread, I decided to start using my Opinel #7 trekking knife.

I always assumed it was a French "brie and bread" knife, looks like this one ... View attachment 509658

very sharp, holds an edge, but I assumed too lightweight for regular use other than cutting stuff at a picnic.

I just stuck it in my pocket and used it all the time, whittling sticks, cutting wire insulation, things like that. Turns out it's actually a pretty durable knife! Deceptively strong because it is so lightweight, I often forget I even have it in my pocket.
Same experience with me.   Have several now.   For the money they’re top drawer.
 

It’s my pocket carry.  Blade is tough & holds the edge.   Easy to lose in a hurry - I always keep an eye out for it when I get done.

 

mikewof

mikewof
45,639
1,209
So- how do you keep them sharp? For the past few years I've been using the EdgePro Apex system, with the standard waterstones and a few higher-end after-market ones. This handles all of my knives, large and small. I used to do it all freehand, but never got the same results, especially with my large kitchen knives. Not cheap, but my wife was paying attention while I was dropping hints, so it was a birthday gift.

I've since bought them for both of my sons. Well worth it.

View attachment 509732
I use an old ceramic rod, not perfect, but it works, those pro sharpening sets are expensive, but I would like to invest in one. At the Spyderco factory down the street from me, they use their own Tri-Angle sharpener, I saw the demo, looks good ... https://www.spyderco.com/catalog/details/204MF/Tri-Angle-Sharpmaker-reg-/77

 

Grande Mastere Dreade

Snag's spellchecker
I use an old ceramic rod, not perfect, but it works, those pro sharpening sets are expensive, but I would like to invest in one. At the Spyderco factory down the street from me, they use their own Tri-Angle sharpener, I saw the demo, looks good ... https://www.spyderco.com/catalog/details/204MF/Tri-Angle-Sharpmaker-reg-/77
i have the spyderco system , works nicely, you do have to watch your knife angle..  they have gotten expensive, got mine when it was around $40 .. it took me a few years to figure out that the lid, goes over the base when sharpening to extend the handhold

 

Point Break

Super Anarchist
26,284
3,945
Long Beach, California
I free hand on the stone. It takes a bit of price on old shittty knives first. I still don't get it right every time. Perhaps I should try one of those systems. Will they accommodate chisels and plane irons?

 

Grizz

Beats the crap out of me
503
221
Northport, NY
I free hand on the stone. It takes a bit of price on old shittty knives first. I still don't get it right every time. Perhaps I should try one of those systems. Will they accommodate chisels and plane irons?
@Point Break, chisels and plane irons are much less of a challenge. For those, I typically flatten the backs and establish the primary bevel with diamond plates, starting with extra-extra coarse for quick stock removal, and finishing with waterstones. For the secondary bevel I use a Veritas honing guide and waterstones only. Again, I did it freehand for years, but eventually realized that I was always producing slightly rounded bevels. Before I broke down and got the diamond plates I did a lot of flattening on abrasive paper stuck with spray adhesive on thick plate glass.

The EdgePro and similar jigs are really meant for knives, where the hard part is maintaining a constant bevel along a curved edge. Even the mechanized systems like Tormek and Work Sharp do a crappy job at this.

Here's the veritas jig I use for chisels and plane irons.

https://www.leevalley.com/en-us/shop/tools/sharpening/guides/51868-veritas-mk-ii-deluxe-honing-guide-set?item=05M0920

Here's the extra-extra coarse diamond plate for initial flattening:

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B000GLPCO2/ref=twister_B09TLPY1T6?_encoding=UTF8&th=1

 
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Point Break

Super Anarchist
26,284
3,945
Long Beach, California
@Point Break, chisels and plane irons are much less of a challenge. For those, I typically flatten the backs and establish the primary bevel with diamond plates, starting with extra-extra coarse for quick stock removal, and finishing with waterstones. For the secondary bevel I use a Veritas honing guide and waterstones only. Again, I did it freehand for years, but eventually realized that I was always producing slightly rounded bevels. Before I broke down and got the diamond plates I did a lot of flattening on abrasive paper stuck with spray adhesive on thick plate glass.

The EdgePro and similar jigs are really meant for knives, where the hard part is maintaining a constant bevel along a curved edge. Even the mechanized systems like Tormek and Work Sharp do a crappy job at this.

Here's the veritas jig I use for chisels and plane irons.

https://www.leevalley.com/en-us/shop/tools/sharpening/guides/51868-veritas-mk-ii-deluxe-honing-guide-set?item=05M0920
Thanks! I have that veritas jig and use that for the plane irons and chisels. I still freehand the knives and its the curve that puzzles me with the knife sharpening jigs. Never touched one but watched you tube stuff. Till I can figure out how to solve that question I'll continue to freehand I guess. Sometimes the results are awesome.........sometimes............less than awesome. My kitchen knives are all Zwilling Pro S so I'm reluctant to surrender them to a questionable jig. My steak knives are Shun and I have not tried to sharpen them yet. They don't really see enough use use to make it necessary yet. An occasional run over the steel to burnish them and they're good to go. 

 

Point Break

Super Anarchist
26,284
3,945
Long Beach, California
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