Boat for Atlantic Circuit/Circumnav

Dino

Anarchist
820
17
Ireland
Hi,

In the next year to 18 months my situation is likely to change considerably and I am considering heading off cruising. Initially I am interested in doing an Atlantic Circuit - Ireland/UK to Northern Spain - Portugal - Canary Islands and the ARC to St Lucia in November. After that I'd like to spend 6 months cruising the Caribbean. Then I'll either head up the east coast of the US and back across the Atlantic or I might head for the pacific. After the Caribbean the plan is very loose and flexible.

I am thinking of taking 12 to 24 months of a sabbatical from work and I will have enough cash to keep myself and run the boat as long as I don't party or live in marinas too much. I have fairly extensive boat experience as I have spent all my life sailing & boating and working on boats. I have a lot of racing experience both inshore and offshore but all as crew. I have fairly limited cruising experience apart from delivery trips and a few weeks cruising.

I've done a lot of internet searching looking at boats and I reckon I would need a boat around 40ft. Being a racer I'd like something with a bit of performance but that may not be wise in a bluewater boat. A fair bit of the trip will be singlehanded but I intend to bring crew for the transat and some other long legs.

I will have €50,000 to €80,000 to spend on a boat and there are two standout boats that interest me at the moment. The Oyster 39 and the Trident Warrior 40. Also, some of the early Jeanneaus and Elans look okay.

One issue I find with a lot of cruising boats is that the cockpit is small and shallow and I think that a good long distance cruiser should have a good sized cockpit as a lot of time will be spent there.

I've followed a lot of the YouTubers like La Vagabonde and Chase the Story but I'd like more information on the planning, boat selection, route planning, what to bring, what equipment I need, etc, etc.

Has anyone come across any good blogs or website with info like this?

Has anyone done a similar trip for a similar duration?

 

Panoramix

Super Anarchist
People have used very different boats to achieve similar trips ranging from Wharram catamarans to very conventionnal production boats and fragile racing boats to steel boats built like a tank.

In short IMHO there is no "right" boat, just a boat that is right for you.

Wood and carbon fibre boat designed for inshore racing which went around the atlantic (9.2m, about 2 tons "racing weight", wood and carbon fibre) :

1242734.jpg


Steel boat designed to sail in high latitudes that is now going round the atlantic : http://www.marinetraffic.com/en/ais/details/ships/227336890

And there are lots of old and new GRP boats doing it every year.

 

Hwyl

Anarchist
694
7
Buy the boat in the US or the Caribbean and save quite a bit if money. When a good friend asked me the same question, I recommended the Freedom 36/38. They eventually bought a 38 and it worked out well. Got their money back on resale.

 

Mr. Ed

Super Anarchist
3,006
341
Good luck and tell us more: you can't get away with " my situation is likely to change considerably " without either bragging or whinging. Selling up the firm, or getting ignonomiously divorced? Cash out, or Cancer? [by the way, ignore me if you want, I'm a nosy bastard who likes nothing more than poking around in other people's lives.]

We're still shackled to work, but bought the boat ahead of time. Because we could I suppose. We toyed with buying a boat abroad but I didn't fancy it because I know how long it takes to learn the ins and outs of each boat - maybe as a professional it wouldn't be such a hard curve for you. In our case five years was too long (and we still don't have a date to leave) because much of the electric shite is failing now - your 18 months or so sounds just right.

And I won't offer any more advice because you ask for people who've done it, not dreamers!

E

 

RKoch

Super Anarchist
14,865
346
da 'burg
Although 40' can certainly be single-handed, a bit smaller would be much less physical effort. Something 32-35' would be easily handled, have room for a second person, and plenty of storage.

You'll be using an autopilot or windvane 99% of the time, so the cockpit only needs to be big enough to provide a secure workplace when handling sheets and stuff. If you're planning on doing entertaining in port, a large cockpit is nice, since the interior can get cramped entertaining a dinner crowd. I would think going to a resturant would be preferable.

Basically, you want a boat with good sea-keeping characteristics, like stability, motion, balance, and strength of construction. Rig/sails easily handled. Anchor system easily handled, all chain is common for long term cruisers, and will need a reliable windlass. And you'll need ample storage for boat gear, clothing, and provisions.

 

Dino

Anarchist
820
17
Ireland
Mr Ed, you were spot on with the Big C. My wife was diagnosed with primary breast cancer 5 years ago. Went through the full chemo, radiation, surgery, etc. Then 3 years ago it came back and she's gradually going downhill. I'm fully aware of what's coming towards me. I've had a very limited few years with her being sick so I think I need to go away and enjoy myself for a while. We are both only 40 and we have no kids so very few ties except a job and some property. I have a smaller mobo that I'll be selling to help fund the new boat.

I would like to buy the boat at least 6 months in advance to do a shakedown cruise or two and refit as required.

I will have some rental income to live off while away and I will have to negotiate a career break from my job.

This is my escapism during the last few years as things are fairly mundane and dark at home.

 
Last edited by a moderator:

Dino

Anarchist
820
17
Ireland
A good autopilot and windvane are high on the wish-list. I would plan on installing a new heavy duty autopilot and an up-to-date plotter/ais/radar system. Also interested in bring a few toys like scuba gear but not sure if I'd be able to bring a dive compressor small enough, small rib and outboard, a bike or two, paddleboard and definitely some good fishing kit to feed myself along the way.

 

Mr. Ed

Super Anarchist
3,006
341
Mr Ed, you were spot on with the Big C. My wife was diagnosed with primary breast cancer 5 years ago. Went through the full chemo, radiation, surgery, etc. Then 3 years ago it came back and she's gradually going downhill. I'm fully aware of what's coming towards me. I've had a very limited few years with her being sick so I think I need to go away and enjoy myself for a while. We are both only 40 and we have no kids so very few ties except a job and some property. I have a smaller mobo that I'll be selling to help fund the new boat.

I would like to buy the boat at least 6 months in advance to do a shakedown cruise or two and refit as required.

I will have some rental income to live off while away and I will have to negotiate a career break from my job.

This is my escapism during the last few years as things are fairly mundane and dark at home.
Good luck mate good luck. Am lucky on my second marriage and could imagine nothing worse. Really sorry.

 

vjm

Member
Mr Ed, you were spot on with the Big C. My wife was diagnosed with primary breast cancer 5 years ago. Went through the full chemo, radiation, surgery, etc. Then 3 years ago it came back and she's gradually going downhill. I'm fully aware of what's coming towards me. I've had a very limited few years with her being sick so I think I need to go away and enjoy myself for a while. We are both only 40 and we have no kids so very few ties except a job and some property. I have a smaller mobo that I'll be selling to help fund the new boat.

I would like to buy the boat at least 6 months in advance to do a shakedown cruise or two and refit as required.

I will have some rental income to live off while away and I will have to negotiate a career break from my job.

This is my escapism during the last few years as things are fairly mundane and dark at home.
I am so sorry, Dino. My mom went through breast cancer twice and it was rough and frightening. Fair winds!

 

Tom Scott

Super Anarchist
2,651
2
One issue I find with a lot of cruising boats is that the cockpit is small and shallow and I think that a good long distance cruiser should have a good sized cockpit as a lot of time will be spent there.
For smaller boats heading offshore, a large cockpit is actually considered a liability by many people because it can take on a suprisingly large amount of water in a knock down or pooping. It can take a long time to drain making any subsequent filling of water more burdensome, or even threatening. So, the smallest cockpit that you can stretch out in and feel comfortable in is probably the best choice for an ocean crossing vessel (...at least it is for many folks).

I have a small boat (30'), and it has a moderately large cockpit that has been filled a few times. The prior owner took a breaking wave over the stern while transiting an inlet and took water belowdecks too. He never viewed the largish cockpit as an "asset" after that. So, rather than cockpit size, I would suggest you focus on ergonomics - how the various angles and facets feel and fit your body size and shape. Big cockpits on small boats are great for daysailing and coastal cruising. (..that is what I do, and so my cockpit "works" for me). But, for a boat crossing oceans - particularly a "smallish boat" - a large cockpit might fairly be viewed as a liability.

 
Last edited by a moderator:

Mr. Ed

Super Anarchist
3,006
341
But let's skip this one:

Not content with crap on the back

5370333_20150902083630106_1_XLARGE.jpg


It also has a baffling array of crap on the front

5370333_20150902074406885_1_XLARGE.jpg


It does however appear to have a methane based power plant, which could be handy:

"holding tank wind generator,"

 

jack_sparrow

Super Anarchist
37,393
5,094
The open transom, large tennis court sized cockpits marketed with pictures of super models adorning chaise-lounges have the comfort level of a windswept highway in winter. The ideal cockpit configuration with plenty of protection, storage while maximising headroom below was common in production cruiser racers built in the 90's and that era also happens to provide good buying choice. Don't be afraid to get some waterline length. You will enjoy living aboard more, eat up more miles with less provisioning and properly winched, control lines short handed friendly, say cutter rig etc you won't have any trouble handling size. Ideally get someone else's project who has had to abandon the dream, otherwise you will spend your valuable time and money preparing for it, not doing it.

 
Last edited by a moderator:

Dino

Anarchist
820
17
Ireland
A few boats that have caught my eye are...

Oyster 39 Ketch - not quick but very seaworthy, loads of space below and nice big flush deck.

Trident Warrior 38/40 - well regarded offshore cruiser, big deep cockpit and nice big deck to work on. Shallow draft to get into lots of places.

Waiquiez 37,40,43 - probably the quickest, nice size aft cockpit, seaworthy. Good layout, pretty boats.

Dehler 37-41 - good short handed layout, should be quick.

 

PriitV

New member
5
1
One issue I find with a lot of cruising boats is that the cockpit is small and shallow and I think that a good long distance cruiser should have a good sized cockpit as a lot of time will be spent there.
But, for a boat crossing oceans - particularly a "smallish boat" - a large cockpit might fairly be viewed as a liability.
10 points! ;)

For long distance short-handed sailing and "live a board at anchor" in best smaller deep PROTECTED cocpit! "No sports at all!"

Two masted (more is safer); center cocpit; hard dodger, better deck-saloon or pilothouse; cutter-rig with self-tacking jib; shallow draft (liftin keel); aluminium etc, etc. OK, it's "my dream"... and experience. But this kind yacht isn't cheap. Or are She very old Lady...

Boat is You'r Home for months or years - dry land You have windows, curtains etc, You watch out, sitting on the chair. Are You really want live in cellar?

50-80K euros is big money. One type - or make-model - in this range money: British quality Southerley! Model 115 is in this price-range.

http://www.boatshed.com/southerly_115-boat-203053.html

 
Last edited by a moderator:

Latest posts




Top