boat weight one design

jokerx9

Member
123
2
NY
If a one design boat is heavy, say 50-80lbs over weight, how much of a factor is that? Should you sail with a lighter crew to compensate? Thoughts?
 

JohnMB

Super Anarchist
2,840
609
Evanston
Not sure it can be taken out of a converted e scow.

50-80lb on an e-scow will make a difference. (its >5% of the weight of the boat)
Light crew will not help (most of the time), you mainly want that crew weight hiking not parasitic in the boat.

If you can't take the weight out of the boat then use if while you learn and look for a lighter boat.
 

Steam Flyer

Sophisticated Yet Humble
44,287
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Eastern NC
Not sure it can be taken out of a converted e scow.

Converted to what?

Most smallish one-designs (and despite being 28 ft long, it has no keel, no cabin, and races closed courses on sheltered waters) have well known tables of weights of all the components. It's a good idea if you want to race, to unrig and then fully commission the boat; and if it's known to be overweight then you can weigh the major components and see where excess poundage resides.
 

Steam Flyer

Sophisticated Yet Humble
44,287
9,617
Eastern NC
Unless you are regularly in contention for your National championship I wouldn't worry too much about 80 pounds on a boat with a sailing weight of 1600 plus pounds. One missed shift will hurt more than the excess pounds.

Hmmm... yes, I'd certainly agree that working on skills and tuning will pay bigger dividends than trying to reduce weight by 4~5%. But it doesn't hurt, and if that weight is all in the bow or stern, it hurts quite a bit more than just excess random poundage.
 

Mr Moab

Anarchist
637
97
Unless you are regularly in contention for your National championship I wouldn't worry too much about 80 pounds on a boat with a sailing weight of 1600 plus pounds. One missed shift will hurt more than the excess pounds.
I hear people say this all the time. Not sure that is the right way to look at it.

If you are 80lbs over weight in a competitive one design you are going to be a tick slower. And on the first beat, that might be the difference between crossing someone or getting bounced the wrong way on the course. Now you cant get to that good shift. You can quickly find your self off the front row of the fleet, now you are in gas and the world just keeps getting more challenging. Or maybe on the run you cant hold that overlap at the bottom mar and now round outside in gas. So while your 80 lbs may have been a small fraction of a knot in speed, what it harms in terms of tactical options can be far greater.
 

Sail4beer

Usual suspect
10,041
3,429
Toms River,NJ
That’s the equivalent weight of a couple of 5 gallon buckets of paint. That’s not a small amount on a one design Escow. I can’t imagine a repair job or assym launch port using that much material. Was the scale accurate and the boat completely empty and dry inside?
 

Doug Halsey

Member
342
100
I hear people say this all the time. Not sure that is the right way to look at it.

If you are 80lbs over weight in a competitive one design you are going to be a tick slower. And on the first beat, that might be the difference between crossing someone or getting bounced the wrong way on the course. Now you cant get to that good shift. You can quickly find your self off the front row of the fleet, now you are in gas and the world just keeps getting more challenging. Or maybe on the run you cant hold that overlap at the bottom mar and now round outside in gas. So while your 80 lbs may have been a small fraction of a knot in speed, what it harms in terms of tactical options can be far greater.
There's an old saying: "Nothing makes your tactics look better than a fast boat."
 

jokerx9

Member
123
2
NY
That’s the equivalent weight of a couple of 5 gallon buckets of paint. That’s not a small amount on a one design Escow. I can’t imagine a repair job or assym launch port using that much material. Was the scale accurate and the boat completely empty and dry inside?
I thought the boat was dry, but there is alot of places for water to hide in an e scow. Going to re-weigh it again. I agree the conversion should not had that much weight.
 

Rubadub1

New member
16
1
withheld
My shark 24 at 2300 lbs was 35 lbs overweight. A top Canadian female sailor crewing for me said get that weight out! But I also raced the Bluenose 24 class out east. They had not found a weight correlation to championships with boats up to 15% heavy still winning. I think missed wind shifts likely are the #1 reason racers win or lose.
 

JM1366

Member
145
82
Wisconsin
Did you remember to unstrap the boat from the trailer? All kidding aside, 50 - 80 pounds is significant.

First make sure that the boat is COMPLETELY dry. I've seen a few boats that accumulated a bunch of water in the kingplank as the result of people not removing the plugs while the boat is being stored. 80 pounds is enough that you've got MANY gallons of water somewhere. Do you hear sloshing noises when the boat is on the crane?

Next, how much lead is in the boat? If you've got 30 - 40 pounds of lead, that's easy enough to remove (then get the weight recertified).

If the boat doesn't have any lead in it and is STILL 80 pounds over the 965 pounds spec, time to start digging. That's a lot of weight for a boat to gain. The conversion doesn't add anywhere close to that. The bowsprit is about 2 pounds, and the bulkhead and housing are each much less than 10.

Next thing that can get heavy: Styrofoam floatation. Rip all of it out and replace it with something that isn't rotting and waterlogged. Melges has those goofy cube containers they recommend. Some boats use airbags, and others use new foam that isn't full of water and rodent crap.

You can check the cored panels with a moisture meter, but I'd be surprised if that were to blame on a boat that's been cared for. The coring is foam, and there aren't a whole ton of ways for water to get in. Perhaps if it was left uncovered in a field for two years the deck might be wet, but even that would surprise me a bit.

If you have a good way to check (easiest way I know of is to compare with a known-good boat), where that weight is matters as much (or more) than how much it is. 75 pounds centered around the mast step or boards doesn't matter nearly as much as 75 pounds right in the bow or stern.

As a side note, what's the age? Is this a recent boat that was converted (say, newer than 1995), or are we talking about something much older?
 

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