Boom envy

Thorvald

Member
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Puget Sound
All those boats out there sailing around with their nice long booms and me with my skinny IOR main, 34' X 9.17'. You gotta admit that's a skinny bitch of a mainsail. I read a thread on another website regarding a Peterson 34 where the poster was saying that the key to getting the boat sailing really well was to add as much as 20% to the boom and the mainsail foot. He had just welded on the extra length to his boom. I'm thinking when it comes time to get a new mainsail adding to the boom is not very expensive relatively speaking. What could it cost? A few hundred?

I'd like to hear some thoughts on this and also about other mods that could be made to the old IOR type rig to improve it, from simple stuff to the more drastic. I see that the Half Ton cuppers at Cowes were almost exclusively fractional rigs. Another mod I think I've seen is increasing the E dimension and then then going to a blade type headsail perhaps a 110 or 120. Changing the whole rig is a bit much for most regular guys but for those using old IOR types as racer/cruisers maybe the larger main and a 130 on a furler would make alot of sense.

I know my pal Bob will probably respond right away and I saw his old Bingo on the racecourse awhile back with a tiny little genoa which is one of the things that got me thinking. There must be others of you out there that have modified their rigs from the original or know someone who has. Let's hear it.

 

paps49

Super Anarchist
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Adelaide Australia
Sounds nice TV but I'm thinking you would have to be very careful with the balance. I'm thinking a forward movement of the mast may be involved, that can get expensive.

 

Innocent Bystander

Super Anarchist
11,749
756
Lower Southern MD
I agree with Paps, geting the balance right may be difficult. This is one of the places where getting some professional advice may save a lot of pain (or transform the boat). Adding sail area aft of the C/E and decreasing area forward (bigger main, smaller jib) can be a prescription for massive weather helm.

 

SailAR

Anarchist
989
3
What's the boat in question? There are a lot of older IOR designs that have gone this route with good success. Contessa 35's, Taylor 38's come to mind.. I agree that some thought about balance is needed and an NA being involved would be prudent.

 

Thorvald

Member
405
0
Puget Sound
US 30. Evolved from a Peterson half tonner. Much the same rig proportions as the Peterson 34 which is why I thought it might be a good candidate. That being said the balance is virtually perfect as is.

 

Kris Cringle

Super Anarchist
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2,403
New boats, what with their blistering speed, duplex accommodations below, we owners of old slow cramped designs, don't have much to brag about.

/monthly_11_2011/post-23613-090782600%201322664344_thumb.jpg

But our booms, well, they speak for themselves.

 

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Bob Perry

Super Anarchist
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Thor:

I think it is a matter of how well balanced the boat is now. With the mast and keel locations fixed you have limited options. If you add to the boom length you will pick up more helm. But old IOR boats were generally well balanced so you maye have some wiggle room there. You could just add sail area and that is always good. 20% is quite a bit. In terms of bang for the buck I think there are other places I'd spend my money first on the boat. It would be a fun experiment and providing you did not bugger up the balance I can't see it hurting.

 

beauvrolyk

Super Anarchist
Thor:

I've sailed on a couple of X-IOR boats with longer booms and generally they put a stubby bowsprit (2-4 feet) on to keep the center of the rig in the same place. They also did this because they lived in a place without much wind. One of the boats I sailed on a lot was difficult (and I'm being kind here) to steer down wind with the smaller rig and once they got the 40% longer boom and the 5' bowsprit with bigger chutes on her it was nearly impossible. Those folks didn't mind because they sailed in Long Island sound where it's generally quite light wind. When it blows, they use a staysail, set where the old jibs were on the stem-head, and a double reefed main. I will say, she goes like a BAT with the big rig in 10k of wind. I'm currently talking to them about a much bigger rudder, which could help.

Of course, they could just get a CCA or IMS boat that doesn't have the control problems but they like this boat and have put a ton of work into stuff to make it exactly the way they want it. I have told them to be VERY VERY careful if they go to Bermuda in this thing, reef at the dock and don't shake it out until you get there sort of stuff.

BV

PS: You know it's not how long it is that matters.... it's how you use it.

 
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Mung Breath

Anarchist
772
0
Connecticut
If it won't break the bank and you love the boat, why not experiment? Change one thing at a time. My own early IOR boat (1971) was originally drawn with an 18' boom. It was later shortened to 15' to accommodate emerging IOR rules. Thereafter, the pitiful thing suffered from lee helm her entire life. First thing I did when I bought her was return to the original boom length and traveler location (and increase mast height with a CF rig for about a 20% increase in mainsail size....but ditched the 150% #1 for a non-overlapping #3). Night and day improvement! Slightly more tender and she requires a reef earlier but a welcome trade off. Note here though that I did not extend the boom past the 'as drawn' spec.

Funny enough, I was far, far more nervous about this 'experiment' than my naval architect. He didn't give it a second thought. Like Bob says, these boats (with a high stability index) can be very forgiving. And they love a modern rig design.

 

Thorvald

Member
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0
Puget Sound
Bob, thanks for the good advice as always. Weather helm, of course, is the first thing that comes to mind when considering an increase in the E dimension. I was surprized to read on the other website that the poster added 20% to his boom. No mention of a helm issue at all, and he claimed to have worked for the designer (Peterson?). Most likely I'll not change anything but I thought it was an interesting topic to discuss. Saw a sail on a used sail website with a foot dimension 2" longer than my specs in new/unused condition. That I might take a chance on. I think I could handle that with zero mods.

Beau, 40% longer boom? That is a bit radical. I like the part that she goes like a bat but the other bit about going downwind doesn't sound so good. You mean a guy can't have it all? Re: your P.S. Maybe I'll work on my boom technique.

 

CharlieCobra

Super Anarchist
2,766
0
PNW
New boats, what with their blistering speed, duplex accommodations below, we owners of old slow cramped designs, don't have much to brag about.

/monthly_11_2011/post-23613-090782600%201322664344_thumb.jpg

But our booms, well, they speak for themselves.

No doubt...

 

Ajax

Super Anarchist
14,605
2,893
Edgewater, MD
Ha ha, ok you got me. Cool stuff. I love how Annie has a spar on the stern just to have something to mount the mainsheet to.

 

beauvrolyk

Super Anarchist
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