Bring back the IOR

davidprobable

Super Anarchist
1,609
0
Prompted by the anti geezer post that arose last week, and having mulled the current state of racing in my area, I propose that IOR be reinstated as the paramount rule. Aside from snide verbiage about bumps and tortured sterns, IOR during the '70's/ early 80's created the best racing for the most people. The middle class could field a racing yacht of new design due to many nearby builders and they were always in the 39 foot to 50 foot range. The racing was close and spectacular with large fleets from A division on down. The fights over rating were glorious. Now what do we have? Middling dinghies with fractional rigs and one design raison d'etre since without one design racing no one would want them. And, they are all small boring little wannabe floatables. The middle class has been dumbed down into Melges mentality crap. Regattas this weekend were full of junk. I can't think of one boat in our area that wouldn't have been accidentally dropped by crane back in the 70's/80's. They look like crap and are built like crap and are throwaways designed for sailers with 2 foot arms and 4 foot pockets. The youth of today only think of speed which is a relative concept. It is more fun driving up wind in a 46 foot IOR boat beside a competitor at 7 knots given the power of such boats, than perhaps going upwind in a Melges beside a Melges because speed is relative and is tempered by power. The upwind power of a 46 foot IOR boat makes a Melges and their ilk, seem to be better used in your bathtub. There are huge numbers of old IOR boats waiting for new owners at insignificant cost and what great racing could be had. Come on geezers, stand up to these young whelps in their toy boats waiting to inherit enough money to buy a real boat. Lets get back at it.

 

davidprobable

Super Anarchist
1,609
0
  • Thread starter
  • Banned
  • #3
No, a 2006 Ford Gt . Are you waiting to collect an MG from your parents estate perhaps? Wishful thinking?

 

Presuming Ed

Super Anarchist
11,012
166
London, UK
No thanks.

yandy41168.jpg


 

learningJ24

Super Anarchist
4,344
390
No, a 2006 Ford Gt . Are you waiting to collect an MG from your parents estate perhaps? Wishful thinking?

Don't diss British iron; the B is exponentially more fun to drive than the wife's Camry.

I can see going upwind in an IOR-nosaur but what about downwind? My experience is limited but downwind in a breeze wasn't a lot of fun in the boats I was on. (admittedly, 1/4 tonners). Wasn't downwind manners what made the J-24 and the Moore 24 such breakthrough boats in the 70's?

 

Phoenix

Super Anarchist
2,170
0
Eastport, USA
The problem with IOR had less to do with the rule itself than the constant diddling by the design committee. The swing toward fuller stern sections had already begun when the rule went into its' death spiral. Witness Sweet Okele (sp), Rogues Roost, and the two ton Thunderbird. Marionette was like driving a limo downwind and it was one of the best IOR boats ever designed.

The death came because owners didn't demand minimum accomodation standards as well as a much longer period for rule adjustments. When a boat depreciated by 75% in three years most owners with a brain left the sport.

 

Caca Cabeza

Super Anarchist
Another thing. When IOR was the rule, you didn't have owners and RC getting all whiny when it blew north of 25 knots (Bad to no go -from front page ). I can remember a nearly uncountable number of ocean races in SF when it was 25 at the start and forecast to build. Granted the boats are a handful downwind, but they are rocket ships to weather. It seems now to accommodated the newer designs there are fewer and fewer races that have a significant upwind component. Sure, sliding down with a big asym surfing off the waves is a blast, but what about comfort and getting back uphill? Maybe it's just my age showing.

Bloopers were kinda cool in the day. In fact my best memory ever is popping the blooper on the second day of a two day regatta (with a kick ass party Saturday night) when a pair of pantyhose drifted out. One of the crew said "THAT"S where they wound up.

Go the IOR

 

davidprobable

Super Anarchist
1,609
0
David, dude. Your AARP card is getting soggy and your brain foggy. Shall we also go back to bell bottoms, 33 & 1/3 vinyl as well?

bell bottoms I can pass on, but 33 1/3 vinyl is great. Much better than digital especially with a quality turntable. You should try it before dissing it.

 

davidprobable

Super Anarchist
1,609
0
The problem with IOR had less to do with the rule itself than the constant diddling by the design committee. The swing toward fuller stern sections had already begun when the rule went into its' death spiral. Witness Sweet Okele (sp), Rogues Roost, and the two ton Thunderbird. Marionette was like driving a limo downwind and it was one of the best IOR boats ever designed.

The death came because owners didn't demand minimum accomodation standards as well as a much longer period for rule adjustments. When a boat depreciated by 75% in three years most owners with a brain left the sport.

I agree with most of your observations. I had an S&S 46 sister to Obsession and she was rock solid down wind. Went upwind like a witch as well and was incredibly comfortable to cruise even with a flush deck and pipe berths. They were high quality boats with a useful cruising future/club racing future when no longer grand prix. Thus no need for huge depreciation unless you dumped to buy new. Restructuring use maintained value. Can't be said for modern dinghy crap.

 

davidprobable

Super Anarchist
1,609
0
Another thing. When IOR was the rule, you didn't have owners and RC getting all whiny when it blew north of 25 knots (Bad to no go -from front page ). I can remember a nearly uncountable number of ocean races in SF when it was 25 at the start and forecast to build. Granted the boats are a handful downwind, but they are rocket ships to weather. It seems now to accommodated the newer designs there are fewer and fewer races that have a significant upwind component. Sure, sliding down with a big asym surfing off the waves is a blast, but what about comfort and getting back uphill? Maybe it's just my age showing.

Bloopers were kinda cool in the day. In fact my best memory ever is popping the blooper on the second day of a two day regatta (with a kick ass party Saturday night) when a pair of pantyhose drifted out. One of the crew said "THAT"S where they wound up.

Go the IOR

Couldn't agree with you more. The sailors were tougher as well.

 

Naviguesser

Anarchist
730
0
Ah, yes IOR - pole in the water, boom in the water, pole in the water, boom in the water; man, we're hauling ass now!

Don't confuse the economic heyday of leisure spending in the 70's with boat design rules. IOR had its day during a unique time in American history - post WWII wealth and retail credit - and nothing to do with boat design rules. Computers, materials science, etc. combined with decreased discretionary spending have promoted more pecialized designs and a drop in overall participation. Compare the 'new' SC37 and the Express 37 and what, at the end of the day, are you getting for your money?

Admit it David, you have some bloopers in your garage you want to use again!

 

MR.CLEAN

Moderator
45,205
3,786
Not here
Prompted by the anti geezer post that arose last week, and having mulled the current state of racing in my area, I propose that IOR be reinstated as the paramount rule. Aside from snide verbiage about bumps and tortured sterns, IOR during the '70's/ early 80's created the best racing for the most people. The middle class could field a racing yacht of new design due to many nearby builders and they were always in the 39 foot to 50 foot range. The racing was close and spectacular with large fleets from A division on down. The fights over rating were glorious. Now what do we have? Middling dinghies with fractional rigs and one design raison d'etre since without one design racing no one would want them. And, they are all small boring little wannabe floatables. The middle class has been dumbed down into Melges mentality crap. Regattas this weekend were full of junk. I can't think of one boat in our area that wouldn't have been accidentally dropped by crane back in the 70's/80's. They look like crap and are built like crap and are throwaways designed for sailers with 2 foot arms and 4 foot pockets. The youth of today only think of speed which is a relative concept. It is more fun driving up wind in a 46 foot IOR boat beside a competitor at 7 knots given the power of such boats, than perhaps going upwind in a Melges beside a Melges because speed is relative and is tempered by power. The upwind power of a 46 foot IOR boat makes a Melges and their ilk, seem to be better used in your bathtub. There are huge numbers of old IOR boats waiting for new owners at insignificant cost and what great racing could be had. Come on geezers, stand up to these young whelps in their toy boats waiting to inherit enough money to buy a real boat. Lets get back at it.
There was a 75 year old skipper racing last month's M24 Gulf Coast Champs in Corpus, and he's a lot happier going 18 knots than he ever was going 7. He likely paid less than 30k for his boat, a "throwaway" over 10 years old in race ready condition that still got him into 6th place. Seems like 'old farts' can enjoy adrenalin too.

 
Top