Buy a drink for the US Coast Guard

billy backstay

Backstay, never bought a suit, never went to Vegas
Had an awesome day with USCG sector NY. Went for a ride in one of their newish 45' jet drive patrol boats. Pickup was at north cove, went for a boat ride and then landed at their base on Staten Island and had a tour of what I would call their command center. No pictures allowed in the center but it is basically two parts. One is harbor traffic control and the other is rescue. Saw how the rescue 21 system works, (Think that is the name) and saw them working active cases. Interesting I asked in a emergency if they rather you call them on 16 or a cell phone and they said it does not matter to them these days. The 911 system triangulate the call or get the position good enough and that is passed through. This is a picture of me driving the boat. Joy stick control. View attachment 525383

Obviously, you are the guy on the right (left seat) in Civvies, but the Coastie driving in the other seat has a big ass shit-eating grin!! :D
Lucky guy!! How does one sign up for that tour???
.
 

robalex117

Super Anarchist
Obviously, you are the guy on the right (left seat) in Civvies, but the Coastie driving in the other seat has a big ass shit-eating grin!! :D
Lucky guy!! How does one sign up for that tour???
.
Got an invite through the USCG Foundation. Basically they entertain you and show you around all day, cocktails at NYYC (missed that since I came by boat directly to North Cove) and then they ask you for money.
 

Talchotali

Capt. Marvel's Wise Friend
353
156
Vancouverium BC

Some final closure on this story - 36-foot sailboat Kyklades :

From www.13newsnow.com

Virginia Beach couple share their story after week-long Coast Guard search​


The couple was on their way to Europe when they ran into a storm that knocked out power and the navigation system on their boat.
VIRGINIA BEACH, Va. — The Virginia Beach couple at the center of a Coast Guard search in the Atlantic Ocean are safely back at home – and they made it all on their own.
Sixty-eight-year-old Yanni Nikopoulos and 65-year-old Dale Evelyn Jones tied the knot just a few months ago. Their love for each other is only matched by their love of the sea.

“The ocean is in my soul, it’s in my blood,” Jones said. “We have a common love of sailboats so everything just kind of matched."

Jones has always lived close to the ocean while Nikopoulos said he was born on a sailboat. So it made sense that three weeks ago, the couple would set sail across the Atlantic on a trip to Europe.

On June 8, the couple left Hampton for Portugal, from Old Point Comfort Marina.

They packed six months’ worth of food and brought their 15-year-old Yorkshire terrier, Buddy, along for the ride. But things didn’t go as planned.

“The first storm started. Then, the second storm started. Then, a little bit of quiet," Nikopoulos said. "You know, we went through six storms, two of them were lightning storms.”

On June 13, five days after they left, the couple ran into trouble. Lightning struck their boat.

“All of a sudden it was like, ‘Bam!’ It threw my hands off the wheel and all the lights went out and I said, ‘Yanni, I think I need you!’” Jones said.

Their boat’s electrical system went out, their navigation and communication systems crashed, the food in the boat’s freezer was at imminent risk of going bad, and the strong winds shredded their head sail.

“Eventually, it was claimed by the ocean," Nikopoulos said. "The sail was gone.”

With no sail and no electricity, the couple only had one option: they turned back around.

“We have no communication, so there’s no point of another five weeks of going to Europe without any communication or knowing what to expect," Nikopoulos said. "Everything was destroyed.”

Meanwhile back on shore, after not hearing from them for a few days, their family contacted the Coast Guard on June 17, reporting them missing at sea. The couple’s plight grabbed headlines.

“It’s not only a national story," Nikopoulos said. "My son in Greece phoned us, he saw it on the news in Greece. He said, “What’s going on? I’m so worried.’”

The couple said at the time, they had no idea the Coast Guard might have been looking for them.

After a week-long search, the Coast Guard confirmed they found the couple safe on June 24, roughly 80 miles east of Chincoteague.

Nikopoulos said he rigged a VHF radio to make contact.

But throughout the ordeal, the couple never panicked and they didn’t need rescue. The Coast Guard found the couple sailing back to Virginia on their own. They rigged a sail that worked well enough to carry them all the way home.

“Not much scares me. I’m willing to try anything. I’ve always been a little bit of an adrenaline junkie, anyway," Jones joked. “I left here as a cruise ship passenger, and I came back a sailor.”

They said they’re already planning to try the trip again next year.

The Coast Guard said when they contacted the couple, the couple told them they were not in distress and did not need any assistance.
 
Destin Sandlin of the excellent Smarter Every Day YouTube channel did a Coast Guard series. There's just one video in the series playlist, but you can find the rest on his main page. There's one about the jet boats and how they work (I had no idea). He also has a series about nuclear submarine life.

 
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Talchotali

Capt. Marvel's Wise Friend
353
156
Vancouverium BC
Courtesy of the Island Free Press:

Coast Guard Station Oregon Inlet rescues four caught in heavy seas

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Image from U.S. Coast Guard Station Oregon
On Thursday, September 29, U.S. Coast Guard Station Oregon Inlet (North Carolina) responded to a report of four mariners aboard the S/V KATALYST caught in heavy seas and unable to make way to safe haven.
The Coast Guard’s 47251 and 47258 Motor Lifeboats responded to the incident, with the 47258 directly responding to the distressed mariners and the 47251 conducting a bar standby to ensure the safety of the rescue operation.
Due to the weather conditions, the mariners anchored the sailing vessel outside of the Oregon Inlet Bar and the crew of the 47258 recovered the four mariners after they abandoned ship.
Midway through the operation, the anchor line snapped and the vessel rapidly began drifting onto the bar. The coxswain expertly maneuvered the 47258 into the surf zone to recover the remaining mariners and proceeded to return to the station.
“All mariners are reminded to maintain awareness of current and forecasted weather conditions to ensure the safety of their vessel and crew,” stated Station Oregon Inlet in an online update.
Video at the links below:
A video of the incident can also be found online at https://www.facebook.com/USCGStationOregonInlet.
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Image from U.S. Coast Guard Station Oregon
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Image from U.S. Coast Guard Station Oregon

weather3-8.jpg
I


mage from U.S. Coast Guard Station Oregon

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Image from U.S. Coast Guard Station Oregon

Later:

Vessel from which four mariners were rescued grounds near Oregon Inlet

From the Outer Banks Voice on September 29, 2022

S/V Katalyst on the beach near north end of Oregon Inlet. (NPS Photo.)
Update from the National Park Service: An unoccupied 30-foot catamaran named the Katalyst grounded yesterday afternoon (Sept. 29) near the north end of Oregon Inlet. Prior to the grounding at Cape Hatteras National Seashore, multiple passengers were rescued by the U.S. Coast Guard.
The National Park Service is consulting with the U.S. Coast Guard and working with the owner to have the vessel removed from the beach. Visitors should avoid the area until the sailing vessel is removed in the coming days.
*****
 

EYESAILOR

Super Anarchist
3,543
1,975
Courtesy of the Island Free Press:

Coast Guard Station Oregon Inlet rescues four caught in heavy seas

weather5-3.jpg

Image from U.S. Coast Guard Station Oregon
On Thursday, September 29, U.S. Coast Guard Station Oregon Inlet (North Carolina) responded to a report of four mariners aboard the S/V KATALYST caught in heavy seas and unable to make way to safe haven.
The Coast Guard’s 47251 and 47258 Motor Lifeboats responded to the incident, with the 47258 directly responding to the distressed mariners and the 47251 conducting a bar standby to ensure the safety of the rescue operation.
Due to the weather conditions, the mariners anchored the sailing vessel outside of the Oregon Inlet Bar and the crew of the 47258 recovered the four mariners after they abandoned ship.
Midway through the operation, the anchor line snapped and the vessel rapidly began drifting onto the bar. The coxswain expertly maneuvered the 47258 into the surf zone to recover the remaining mariners and proceeded to return to the station.
“All mariners are reminded to maintain awareness of current and forecasted weather conditions to ensure the safety of their vessel and crew,” stated Station Oregon Inlet in an online update.
Video at the links below:
A video of the incident can also be found online at https://www.facebook.com/USCGStationOregonInlet.
weather7-1.jpg
Image from U.S. Coast Guard Station Oregon
weather1-22.jpg



Image from U.S. Coast Guard Station Oregon

weather3-8.jpg
I


mage from U.S. Coast Guard Station Oregon

weather4-5.jpg

Image from U.S. Coast Guard Station Oregon

Later:

Vessel from which four mariners were rescued grounds near Oregon Inlet

From the Outer Banks Voice on September 29, 2022

S/V Katalyst on the beach near north end of Oregon Inlet. (NPS Photo.)
Update from the National Park Service: An unoccupied 30-foot catamaran named the Katalyst grounded yesterday afternoon (Sept. 29) near the north end of Oregon Inlet. Prior to the grounding at Cape Hatteras National Seashore, multiple passengers were rescued by the U.S. Coast Guard.
The National Park Service is consulting with the U.S. Coast Guard and working with the owner to have the vessel removed from the beach. Visitors should avoid the area until the sailing vessel is removed in the coming days.
*****
Katalyst Owner : Wanna go for sail this weekend?
Friend: What about Hurricane Ian?
KO: Dont worry about it. That's in Florida.
2nd Friend: Shouldn't we check the weather?
KO (looking out of his bedroom window) : Okay, I just have, it looks great.
Friend: I dont have a lot of experience
KO: Dont worry, neither do I, its easy, plus its a catamaran and doesn't tip over.
Friend 2 : What should I wear?
KO: Bring jeans and a waterproof jacket in case it gets cold.....and beer.....let's party.
 

Talchotali

Capt. Marvel's Wise Friend
353
156
Vancouverium BC
Coastguard seeks Youtube Sailor gone missing...

From KOMO TV, Seattle

Coast Guard searching for missing man chronicling solo sail to Florida on social media​


by JESSICA A. BOTELHO | The National Desk
Friday, October 7th 2022

The US Coast Guard Northeast is asking to help them find 22-year-old Matthew Dennis, who recently set sail from Massachusetts to Florida and has not been heard from since Thursday, Sept. 29, 2022. (Photo: The US Coast Guard Northeast)



WASHINGTON (TND) — The U.S. Coast Guard Northeast is asking the public to help them find a missing man who recently set sail from Massachusetts on his way to Florida.

Authorities said 22-year-old Matthew Dennis left Salem, Massachusetts, going toward Florida in a 28-foot fiberglass sailboat.
He was last heard from Sept. 29, off the coast of Long Island, New York," the Coast Guard noted on Twitter Friday.

Dennis had been chronicling a solo trip at sea on social media by sharing videos on YouTube and TikTok.

In one video dated Sept. 22, Dennis, who is from Colorado, said he "recently dropped everything," sold all his stuff, bought a boat, and moved aboard. He said he purchased the boat in Salem, which is north of Boston.
"I just recently sailed it across the Boston Harbor into Scituate," Dennis said. "I'm making my way down to the Cape Cod Canal. I'm going to sail down to the Cape Cod Canal and then hopefully on down to Florida, making just stops along the way...and resting up when I need to. This is my first time single-handing something this big and I'm definitely in way over my head. On top of that, I'm literally going to be doing it single-handedly because I'm pretty sure I broke my arm. I'm hoping it's just a sprain."
He then showed his wrist, which appeared to be wrapped in gauze.

Dennis later said, "we're going to do our best to avoid the hurricane that's coming up, as well."

Less than a week later, Hurricane Ian slammed Cuba, followed by western Florida and then South Carolina.

The Coast Guard said anyone who has information about Dennis should contact them at 617-223-8555.

 
All future 'cheap-sailboat dreamers'/'single-handed wannabees' should have to read about the tale of this guy before they are allowed to post their death march to fate on Youtube:

Coast Guard suspends search for Matthew Dennis, who was sailing from Salem to Florida

  • Published: Oct. 11, 2022, 6:08 p.m.
By Chris Van Buskirk | [email protected]
United States Coast Guard officials said Tuesday afternoon they suspended the search for a sailor who left Salem last month on a sailboat and documented his travels in videos posted online.
Matthew Dennis, 22, who sailed out of the city towards Florida on a white 28-foot fiberglass sailboat, was last heard from on Sept. 29 while he was off the coast of Long Island, New York, the U.S. Coast Guard previously said.

After publicizing Dennis’ disappearance over the weekend, the U.S. Coast Guard said Tuesday they were suspending efforts to find Dennis.
“With no further information or sightings and negative response to Urgent Marine Information Broadcasts, the First District has suspended the search for Matthew Dennis pending further developments,” officials said.
To provide further information, people are encouraged to call (617) 223-8555.
Dennis kept a YouTube channel titled “Sail away with Matthew Dennis” that listed a number of videos depicting his travels on the white sailboat. In one video dated Sept. 22, Dennis detailed the potential difficulty he might run into while trying to navigate to Florida.
“I’m definitely in way over my head,” he said. “On top of that, I’m literally going to be doing it single-handing because I’m pretty sure I broke my arm. So that’s super exciting. I’m hoping it’s just a sprain.”
Dennis said he had “recently kind of dropped everything and sold all my stuff and bought a boat and moved onto it.”
“I bought [the sailboat] in Salem,” he said. “I just recently sailed it across the Boston Harbor into Scituate. I’m making my way down to the Cape Cod Canal. I’m going to sail through the Cape Cod Canal and then hopefully on down to Florida, making just kind of stops along the way.”
In the last video uploaded to the YouTube channel, Dennis went over the struggles he encountered while approaching the Cape Cod Canal.
“I should just have confidence in myself. I just tried to do the jib yesterday, and I ended up just fighting with it for the first half of it, and then I just gave up and put the main sail up,” he said. “... It just kind of goes to show if you are in a situation and you think you know the right answer and people are telling you different things, take into account what they are saying, but at the end of the day, you are the one that is going to go through it, so trust your instincts on it.”
 
Their goose may not be cooked...


A Cook Shortage Threatens To Sink U.S. Coast Guard Operations

Craig Hooper, Senior Contributor (courtesy of Forbes - www.forbes.com)
Oct 31, 2022,04:54pm EDT
1667327717664.png
This Cutter spent 43 days at sea, supported by a single cook, carrying extra food in an external freezer to hold extra required food.
In a reminder that high-tech militaries are only as strong as their weakest supporting link, a long-standing cook shortage threatens to sideline the U.S. Coast Guard.
Newly recruited to the high-tech, great-power struggle in the Western Pacific, the Coast Guard is in a struggle for trained workers. But rather than focus solely on waging a bare-knuckle labor fight to keep elite operations specialists, electronics technicians, cyber operators, and other glamorous workers in the fleet, the Coast Guard is also paying big money to recruit and retain cooks, or, in Coast Guard vernacular, “culinary specialists.”
The Coast Guard’s cook shortage is a full-fledged readiness crisis.
Chronically underfunded, the Coast Guard is always struggling to address mission shortfalls. And while military combatant commanders request more Coast Guard help, more cutters are heading to sea without a full complement in the kitchen. Normally a routine matter, kitchen staffing shortfalls have made ship galleys into worrisome “single points of failure.”
Without cooks, the Coast Guard’s multimillion-dollar ships are effectively “sunk,” and unable to operate effectively.
Recognizing the old military adage that “an army travels on its stomach,” the Coast Guard is pushing hard to fill the gap. An enlisted recruit with a culinary degree can get a $50,000 bonus, jumping the recruit and apprentice ratings to enter the Coast Guard as a full-fledged Third-Class Petty Officer. A culinary certificate holder gets $45,000. An untrained Coast Guard recruit with an interest in tending a kitchen can go to culinary school, and, upon completion, get a $40,000 reward.
And that’s not all. To keep cooks in the service, the Coast Guard will pay $30,000 as a re-enlistment bonus.
The Coast Guard’s “culinary specialist” shortage is a cautionary readiness tale for Congress. America’s high-tech military is only as good as their most basic and most mundane foundations. But after years of cost-cutting, privatizing and other “rob-Peter-to-pay-Paul” schemes, those humble foundations are far less resilient than they should be.
Coast Guard culinary specialists are critical afloat. But, on bases, contractors have taken away many shore billets culinary specialists need to recharge after a stint at sea. Lacking spots at kitchens ashore, Coast Guard culinary specialists have little choice but to spend their career constantly at sea, struggling to keep old or under-designed ship kitchens operational. And when they are lucky enough to find a shoreside job, they’re usually snatched away to temporarily fill in for an understaffed vessel.
Coast Guard figures say it all. For a cook to promote from Second Class Petty Officer to a First Class Petty Officer, the Coast Guard requires two years of rated sea time. With the average time to advancement of five years, promotion-minded cooks spend about half their time at sea, often in ships whose galleys were designed and built in the 1950s or ‘60s.
Faced with those types of demands, few culinary specialists stay on.

A Ship Sails On Its Stomach
This summer, as the Sentinel-class Fast Response Cutter USCGC Oliver Henry (WPC 1140) cruised out of Guam, a base crew of 24, boosted by a linguist, corpsman, and various ship riders, was fed by a single cook, a First Class Petty Officer. The Coast Guard simply didn’t have junior culinary specialist available to round out the small ship’s normal two-person kitchen staff.


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Playing chicken with the crews collective stomach?
The staffing shortfall was unusual, as the 43-day cruise of just over 8,000 nautical miles was a high-profile deployment. Unaccompanied, the little cutter traveled to Papua New Guinea, Australia, and the Federated States of Micronesia. The ship made headlines when it was turned away from the Solomons Islands and barred from making a port call at Honiara.
It was no gentle little pleasure cruise. The small, 353-ton ship took on missions more typical of a far-larger Medium Endurance Cutter, handling a range of Illegal, Unregulated, and Unreported Fishing (IUU-F) enforcement work for the Western and Central Pacific Fisheries Commission. It worked with Australian partners, honing shared skills, and scouted out logistical support stops suitable for use by other busy Fast Response Cutters.
Through it all, the ship’s ultimate success depended upon a single, hard-working cook. In a post-cruise interview, the cutter captain, Lt. Freddy Hofschneider, noted that the hard-pressed culinary specialist “prepared over 3,000 meals while managing all the port provisioning.”
“Preparing meals on a cutter is never easy,” remarked Hofschneider, “so doing that during a 43-day patrol on an FRC is quite the feat.”
The cutter captain was right. Fast Response Cutters were not originally envisioned as long-cruising ocean greyhounds. They were built to support a nominal endurance of five days, and their kitchens are not designed for long deployments. The USCGC Joseph Gerczak (WPC 1126), on a similarly long cruise, “had extra freezers and reefers on the bridge and out of the mezzanine deck.”
USCGC Oliver Henry was no different. Hofschneider continued, “we procured an extra freezer that we kept outside.”
But the cook on the Oliver Henry had to do more than just prepare food. He had to serve as an ersatz supply officer, helping the ship find supplies as pulled into ports that American ships hadn’t visited since World War II. “This patrol was challenging,” Hofschneider said, “because we pulled into some places where food stores were minimal.”
Despite the lengthy and short-staffed patrol, the culinary specialist rose to the occasion. “He kept the crew happy and well fed,” remarked the cutter captain. The cook wasn’t totally alone. “As a crew, we also helped in the galley to schedule designated days for others to prepare meals,” and the little ship “had some great amateur chefs aboard who assisted” regularly.
But the experiences aboard America’s long-deploying Fast Response Cutters emphasize some of the challenges facing critical but oft-overlooked members of the Coast Guard team. Fancy capabilities are good to have, but, ignore cooks and kitchens, and multi-million-dollar ships will spend a lot of time pierside, useless.
If the cook shortage shows signs of being a systemic problem, resistant to financial incentives and other enticements, the Coast Guard should put more energy and innovation into designing optimal galley spaces. In government ship design, kitchens can be relative afterthoughts, kludged in after all the design money and extra space has gone towards gee-whiz combat systems and other fancy things. If the Coast Guard is asking culinary specialists to do the impossible, then help should be designed in, up front.

1667327439469.png
Whose turn is it to do dishes?
Personnel As Strategy
Of the maritime services, only the Coast Guard Commandant, Admiral Linda Fagan, has made talent management a central focus of her Service. Her new strategy is refreshingly blunt, saying “the total end strength of our workforce is challenged,” and, if not addressed, shortfalls “will lead to reduced capacity and mission effectiveness.”
While many of Admiral Fagan’s personnel proposals are focused on keeping the Coast Guard a competitive employer in a world full of flexible, high-tech employment opportunities, Fagan is also laying the foundations to grow the Coast Guard’s mundane-but-critical support staff.
To do that, Admiral Fagan has prioritized shore infrastructure investments, and, by better integrating the shore-time needs of the Coast Guard’s hard-pressed culinary specialist cadre, the Coast Guard has an opportunity to open up more opportunities for enlisted staff to provide culinary services ashore. If Fagan’s investments in shoreside infrastructure can redirect some meal hall contracting support that should, in a modern Coast Guard, be done by Coast Guard cooks, the entire Coast Guard fleet will benefit. Sometimes, the pursuit of low-cost base operations must be put aside for the good of the fleet.
Afloat, cooks are critical crew members, enabling an enormous amount of capability. It is time to treat the humble culinary specialist career path with the equivalent respect accorded to Coast Guard pilots, rescue swimmers, and special operators—Coast Guard “elite” who would not function if left unfed.​
 
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Talchotali

Capt. Marvel's Wise Friend
353
156
Vancouverium BC

Sailboat rescue season is upon us, so like the thread title suggests - buy the US Coast Guard a drink at the next opportunity - the bacon they save could be yours.
Coast Guard comes to the rescue of disabled sailboat participating in Salty Dawg Caribbean Rally


Published 8:05 am Thursday, November 17, 2022

Courtesy of the www.thecoastlandtimes.com
sailboat
The Coast Guard rescued two people from a disabled sailboat Tuesday approximately 218 miles east of Cape Hatteras. The 46-foot sailing vessel Big Adventure had struck an object, causing rudder failure. Courtesy U.S. Coast Guard
The Coast Guard rescued two people from a disabled sailboat Tuesday, November 15, 2022 approximately 218 miles east of Cape Hatteras, according to a Coast Guard press release issued early Wednesday evening.
“Watchstanders with Coast Guard Sector North Carolina received notification at approximately 8 a.m. Monday from a good Samaritan that the 46-foot sailing vessel Big Adventure participating in the Salty Dawg Caribbean Rally from Hampton, Virginia to Antigua, had struck an object causing rudder failure,” stated the release. “The shoreside coordinator of the rally was able to establish communications with the vessel via email.
“The District Five command center directed Coast Guard Cutter Lawrence Lawson to the scene where they embarked the two mariners and towed the vessel to Chesapeake Bay where it was transferred to a commercial towboat,” the release continued.
“We encourage all boaters to outfit their vessels with appropriate communications and safety equipment, such as a satellite phone and EPIRB,” said Lt. Sheena Bannon, District Five command duty officer. “When operating more than 20 miles offshore, VHF and cellphone communications become unreliable. Vessels participating in the Salty Dawg Caribbean Rally received a search and rescue briefing from command center personnel prior to their departure, and provided us with emergency contact information, offering many ways to establish communication with the mariners.”
No injuries were reported by the mariners.


sailboat



* * * * *

Three stranded on sinking sailboat 77 miles off coast are rescued, Georgia video shows

By Alison Cutler Updated November 16, 2022 10:39 AM

Courtesy / Read more at: https://www.sacbee.com

All three men were transported to land via helicopter. Screengrab from U.S. Coast Guard Air Station Savannah Facebook Three people on a sinking sailboat were rescued off the coast of Georgia, the Coast Guard said. The rescue team released footage of the men being hoisted into a Coast Guard helicopter hovering over the choppy water.

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Perp Pic

The men were rescued on Nov. 14 and were 77 miles off the coast northeast of Savannah, according to the U.S. Coast Guard Air Station Savannah. The sailboat began to fill up with water, prompting the rescue. In the video, the men are pulled up into the rescue helicopter using a cage-like device. No major injuries or medical concerns were reported during the rescue, according to the Coast Guard. All three men were taken back to Air Station in Savannah, and the operation garnered hundreds of likes and about two dozen comments on Facebook. “Awesome job,” one person commented. “Thank you for your service and dedication to helping others.”


The quick activation of the onboard EPIRB allowed our crew to locate the mariners quickly and accurately," Lt. j.g. Thomas Breard, the aircraft's co-pilot, said. "We ask all mariners to ensure your registration information is up to date for your EPIRB to help contact you in case of an emergency or false alert.

Video link:



* * * * *

Courtesy US Coast Guard/DVIDS

Coast Guard assists 3 aboard disabled, adrift sailboat offshore Galveston, Texas


Coast Guard assists 3 aboard disabled, adrift sailboat offshore Galveston, Texas


GALVESTON, TX, UNITED STATES

11.15.2022

Courtesy Photo

U.S. Coast Guard District 8


A 45-foot Response Boat–Medium crew from Coast Guard Station Galveston, Texas, prepares to tow a disabled, adrift sailboat in the vicinity of the Galveston jetties, Nov. 15, 2022. Due to 20 mph winds, the vessel's proximity to the jetties and the potential for distress, the Coast Guard crew towed the sailboat and its three passengers to the Galveston Yacht Basin. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Fireman Brandon Caliwag)
 
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Talchotali

Capt. Marvel's Wise Friend
353
156
Vancouverium BC
Sailboat loses... job...?


Courtesy of WAVY

HATTERAS, N.C. (WAVY) – The Coast Guard rescued four mariners, including a 15-year-old from a sinking sailboat around 98 miles from Cape Hatteras.
According to a press release, the sailboat crew contact Coast Guard Sector North Carolina around 6 p.m. Wednesday stating that they lost their use of both the sailboat’s engine and job.
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Video link below​
Video Courtesy: U.S. Coast Guard
The Coast Guard was unable to tow the vessel due to the weather conditions and the vessel’s distance from the shore.
The Coast Guard helicopter crew was able to hoist the four mariners safely from the vessel, which at that time had begun filling with water.
No injuries were reported.
 

TheDragon

Super Anarchist
3,077
1,023
East central Illinois
This shit is really weird. I can understand poor Mathew Dennis vanishing in the remnants of Hurricane Ian, he clearly was not ready for the Atlantic, but the catamaran at Oregon Inlet and now this one are inexplicable. How is it that these people head out to sea and then have to be rescued because of engine failure. Do they truly have no idea how to sail a sailboat. The latest one even had the jib slightly unfurled and conditions look moderate.
 

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