Buying a Hanse 548

Peter Andersen

Anarchist
889
212
At least three main issues with the original contract that the YBAA one improves upon - don't let it limit/explicitly detail what the survey can/can't look at, don't limit the reasons you can walk away from the deal, don't make out any deposit check to the Seller - all deposits should go into the broker's escrow account.
Yes standard deals will allow the buyer to walk away 48 hours after getting the survey results, based only on their sole discretion. No reason need be given. It all depends on local market conditions. Your boat may be a Unicorn that shits gold bricks everyone wants. Or the last ugly baby left in the Dubrovnik orphanage which needs to be gone by the end of this model year to make room for fresh new January babies.
 

Navig8tor

Super Anarchist
7,666
2,060
Silver Lining? Article 7.3 is a bit unusal in these parts. If you are not happy with the survey you should be able to reject the deal outright and get your deposit back. 5 pct of this boat could be $500K and a big repair. Why get caught up in what could be a long drawn out mess of a repair? Or counter 2.5 pct

You really should spend the money on a buyers broker or solicitor to help you through the process. Especially if you are putting it into charter service and this is your first experience.
That would be my A-1 recommendation. And dont use the seller's broker surveyor. Find another.
Hopefully all works out ok, but there are a lot of land mines all around you and you dont know how to look for them.

Dont know the Med market excatly but boat prices are coming down. Dont be in a rush if you dont get a deal you like. There will be others.
Agree 7.3 is a bullshit clause. It effectively means you are obliged to purchase the vessel even if any problems are discovered, the current owner will pay to fix problems discovered the boat is yours.
I have seen many examples of "fixed" that would not necessarily fit that definition in the eyes of a purchaser.
If you feel suitably nervous after paying a surveyor and issues have been identified you should be able to walk away not be contractually obligated to proceed.

7.2 is equally vague and implies limits to a surveyors scope of inspection.
If the broker is unwilling to amend these clauses, I would walk away- there are plenty of deals out there and with a possible global slowdown in the offing one of the first things to get off loaded are boats.
 

MauiPunter

Will sail for food
Good luck with the sale. Buying a charter boat is definitely risky. I bought a Hanse 505 and have been very happy with her. We have sailed around 1800nm so far with her. Post pics if you close the deal.
 
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Laurentprat

New member
8
0
Usually the terms say something like "a survey to the satisfaction of the purchaser"

Basically you should be allowed to reject the boat after the survey for ANY reason. Including "something feels wrong but the surveyor can't put put his finger on it". Make sure no admin costs etc will be deducted from the down payment.
Thanks; i will try to have it put in the contract
 

Laurentprat

New member
8
0
Agree 7.3 is a bullshit clause. It effectively means you are obliged to purchase the vessel even if any problems are discovered, the current owner will pay to fix problems discovered the boat is yours.
I have seen many examples of "fixed" that would not necessarily fit that definition in the eyes of a purchaser.
If you feel suitably nervous after paying a surveyor and issues have been identified you should be able to walk away not be contractually obligated to proceed.

7.2 is equally vague and implies limits to a surveyors scope of inspection.
If the broker is unwilling to amend these clauses, I would walk away- there are plenty of deals out there and with a possible global slowdown in the offing one of the first things to get off loaded are boats.
Thanks for your feedback. I will write to them today.
 

CapDave

Member
488
460
Antigua
Hanse yachts are built by factory workers in eastern Europe down to a price. Inspect the boat very very carefully. Do not use a surveyor with a relationship with the broker or vendor.
Hanse's are prone to problems with main bulkhead attachment to the hull & deck. Many bulkheads on Hanse's have cracked near the corners of doors due to stress raising design. Autopilot installations have inadequate "wrap" around sprockets on rotary actuators causing tooth skip and chain wear. The original sails are commonly lowest price awful so if you are not budgeting on new sails then you need to. Many hatches were inadequately sealed to the hull so leak badly. Drainage between bilge sections is poor resulting in water trapped for long periods and problems so ensure all the sole panels are lifted. Fridge condensers were inadequately ventilated resulting in poor refrigeration and high power usage. Check carefully for mast step sag/deck collapse due to poor bulkhead fit.
They are another production boat. They are cheap for what you get. I had a Hanse 430e in which I sailed 11,000 miles. I would not have another one.
Seems like I keep reading reports of rudder problems on Hanse boats, or maybe it's one or two that get repeated over and over??
 

kiwin

Member
365
235
Auckland
Seems like I keep reading reports of rudder problems on Hanse boats, or maybe it's one or two that get repeated over and over??
I didn't have any problems with the rudder, or steering which was Jefa, with the exception of the incorrectly installed autopilot rotary actuator.
 

MauiPunter

Will sail for food
Seems like I keep reading reports of rudder problems on Hanse boats, or maybe it's one or two that get repeated over and over??
I think the rudder construction is quite solid from the stainless tube down to the rudder itself, but the criticism of the autopilot is spot on. It's one of the items that most Hanse owners replace. It's a mechanical AP instead of a hydraulic and you can wear down the teeth and then it slips or breaks a tooth. Then you have to replace the broken gear. It's a known issue that owners deal with as part of maintenance until they can get a new AP unit installed. A lot of owners rotate their gears each season to keep the wear and tear more evenly distributed. It's not a hard job but can be messy.
 




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