Buying an old moth, a Bladerider. Mistake or not?

I think Ill leave the busted main vertical as is for the time being. If I end up building a work shop with a vacuum bag system and an oven, then Ill give it a shot. Most likely the foil will end up on a wall somewhere with a few pairs of old unique skis.

I talked to AMac the other day and he suggested I wet sand my foils up to 4000 grit. I didnt ask him what primer or paint do people paint their foils with before wet sanding them? Is it just a marine grade primer or is it something fancier? I can get nearly unlimited quantities of white or grey gel-coat. Would that work?

We have a reverse PHRF race (slow boats start first, time on distance) at the BYC to close out the season. The race will be about 8 miles. We start infront of the club, and go around the breakwalls that protect our end of the lake. If the wind looks good, Im going to give it a shot in the Moth, no one will give me shit for not actually having a PHRF cert as long as I use a low enough PHRF rating. The Farr 60 with a -60 (might be -69) PHRF will race. Their hull speed in 12-15kts of wind is about 11 kts. What rating should I use to figure out how much of a head start I should give them? I dont have any way to track my speed in 12-15kts of wind. The TP52s on Lake Erie rate aorund -90 PHRF. Im thinking -200? This is a complete guess because the only way Ill enter the race is if I can foil the entire way around the course, and if I can I should crush them, even if I crash a few times.
 
I have the new wand in the boat and sailing was fun Thursday! Almost easy and boring in the 8-14kts we had. Boat never really felt like it wanted to take off and accelerate on the foils, friend who was swapping in with me felt the same way. It never wanted to balance with windward heel either, just foil around nice and level. If I tried to go upwind, it wasn’t a happy boat either. It’s ok, felt good getting a better handle on things for once.

Today was another story, see attached picture. I’m sad…. I left it in the car for 2-3 hours yesterday, in the Sun, in 80°F weather. Ducking sucks. I’m not even going to ask if it’s repairable because I’m sure someone will say it is, cut out a lot of the foam where it popped, pour as much epoxy as you can into it, jam as much carbon cloth as possible in there too, then clamp it as tight as you can until it dries. I might try out of boredom the next week or so, but I don’t feel like wasting $25-50 in epoxy and carbon for something that 95% sure won’t work…
4022C7BF-530B-4E7F-921A-705AA4B2A1E8.jpeg
 
Forward foil had more damage then just the split from the foam, the toe that inserts into the horizontal foil was also cracked, lessons learned. I’m still going to try to repair it to have a spare. AMac said the toe being cracked was from running aground or weeds or hitting a fish, something torqued the edge of the horizontal. Oops. Lesson learned, again….

New 2.3 verticals ordered, and I need to go back to work, so I’m out of commission for a while. Money matters so I went with a factory second 2.3 forward vertical that needs a repair (issue from the mold pressure), and to be fixed then finished. Since I’m getting a deeper centerboard, I also ordered a 2.3 rudder, that also needs finishing, but isn’t a factory second. I’ve got some work to do, but it’s all good! The boat is packed up for now and going into storage for the fall. The plan is to go to the 2023 North American Championships in Florida. The dates haven’t been set yet, but I’ll be off work and will go down as early as I can to practice.

I did have a few questions about possible projects on the boat to make it easier to sail and rig. I keep hearing that adding a bow sprit will be the best upgrade I could do. What is everyone’s thoughts on it? The kit from AMac appears to be super simple to install, but it isn’t exactly cheap. I hate the shrouds/forestay/spreader set up on my boat, they are always getting tangled and I seem to have to take them apart and re-rig them way more often then I feel I should. How do Moth sailors keep their shrouds from being a mess? It seems pretty inexpensive to replace the shrouds with Dyneema SK99, will that help or is that another can of worms not worth opening?
 

Doug Halsey

Member
341
100
...I hate the shrouds/forestay/spreader set up on my boat, they are always getting tangled and I seem to have to take them apart and re-rig them way more often then I feel I should. How do Moth sailors keep their shrouds from being a mess? It seems pretty inexpensive to replace the shrouds with Dyneema SK99, will that help or is that another can of worms not worth opening?
Do you have one of these?

It never takes more than a minute or two to untangle them after they've been kept in there. (Referring to wire stays only)
Mach2SpreaderBag.jpg
 
Last edited:

17mika

Anarchist
959
230
Milan, Italy
I have an extreme solution for that (it has pros and cons).
I always keep shrouds/prodder connected to the boat/wings, all the time. When I rig the sail, I just put it on the boat, connect prodder and stays to the mast, then put mast up and tie the forestay to the boar.

Mic
 
I have an extreme solution for that (it has pros and cons).
I always keep shrouds/prodder connected to the boat/wings, all the time. When I rig the sail, I just put it on the boat, connect prodder and stays to the mast, then put mast up and tie the forestay to the boar.

Mic
I like that idea. Thanks guys
 
Entered my first moth event this weekend, the US Pacific Coast Champs, held at ABYC. Since my boat is still on the east coast, the US Class President found me an Exocet to borrow for the weekend so I could race. Work kept me from racing on Friday, but I learned a TON on Saturday and Sunday. My score line of all DNS and DNFs looks atrocious, but baby steps!

I learned three major lessons during PCCs:

First is that every moth is set up for the individual and if you are an amazing Moth sailor, you can probably hop in any boat and figure it out, but as a beginner, differences in how the tiller bungee acts make a huge difference, never less if the control line take ups work and how to control the bungee tension for the wand. Im comfortable on my boat foiling around, by that I mean I can look away to pull on control lines while foiling, and the first day on the Exocet I was not conformable. The second day I was getting there, but did do some tweaking before going sailing to calm the boat down some.

Second lesson is that my fitness might be acceptable to go rip around on a reach for a few hours, but no where near what it needs to be to complete 1 race, never less 3-4 a day over 3 days. As Helena joked at dinner one night, she does triathlons to train for moth sailing, not completly sure it was a joke or not... Not sure triathlons are in my future, but the gym and hours on the bike clearly need to be. Besides the boat being a ton of fun, its also humbling, and the people are amazing! How many classes does the class president go out of his way to find a boat for someone to borrow for an event.

Third is you personal gear matters, no matter how hot it is in the boat park, if the locals say they are wearing a micro fleece top, dont think you can get away with a sun shirt. I was fine, but was a bit chilly sailing in Saturday after I fell into the sail and shredded it. If something had gone worse, I would of gotten really cold really fast.

ABYC is one of the best clubs for dinghy sailing, period end of story. When ever I dream up of how to 'fix' sailing at home, it often involves moving the break wall SSW 3-4 miles to create a cool race area like ABYC has behind the break wall. If you ever get the chance to go there and race, do it. That place is amazing. I believe the plan is Moth NAs on the East Coast next year some time, so I'll have to make an excuse to get to ABYC for another Moth event.

It was a humbling weekend, but super positive. Thanks to the 3 Nicks, Matt, Dustin, Brooks, Helena, Dan, Richard, and the members at ABYC for putting on such an awesome event. A day of rest and recovery and then back at it for me! Time to get in better shape and figure out how to sail to windward on both port and starboard. On starboard, with a traditional sail (non deck sweeper) I was 10ish degrees lower then the Biekers and a bit slower (I also had huge light air foils so the speed does not bother me much), but on Starboard I was 25 degrees lower then the Biekers and if I tried to come up to be 10 degrees lower, the boat slowed down and I tipped over to windward. Things to work on.
 

17mika

Anarchist
959
230
Milan, Italy
cool recap. :)

stupid question about angles upwind is about mainsheet bridle lenght. having the bridle too long significantly lowers angle, cause to go upwind you reeeeally have to pull main to the centerline. could that be the case?
 
cool recap. :)

stupid question about angles upwind is about mainsheet bridle lenght. having the bridle too long significantly lowers angle, cause to go upwind you reeeeally have to pull main to the centerline. could that be the case?
Possibly? To be honest I really have not messed with the main sheet bridal length on my boat or on the Exocet I raced. I have been trying to keep the main trimmed to where if I need to pull on 4-6in of sheet to pump the sail to get through a light spot, I have it there, maybe Im sailing too high on both tacks? Things to work on when I get my boat back out.

Moth sailing is crazy. I have been living a semi-nomadic life for close to the past 10 years, and now I have a need for a work shop to keep my Mach 2 going. My house shopping no longer is just for a place to live, but also it needs a garage/work shop space for boat work.
 

17mika

Anarchist
959
230
Milan, Italy
ahah welcome to moth life.
i have a photo somewhere of painting my foils and lamimating the bladerider flaps in the kitchen, I would get killed by my girlfriend if I did this today :D

regarding the bridle, my 2c it is pretty important upwind. you have to set it so that at max kicker you get block to block and the boom is on centerline and not really moving. if for example you have it to loose on the right side, you easily lo9se 5 degrees upwind on starboard, cause the boom won't stay in the centerline when u go block2block.

the tradeoff you desctribe (main closeto centerline but with some margin in case of a light spot) is really vital to get good angles upwind. good guys have the mainsheet reeeeealy close to centerline and just play it few cm upwind. it comes with time and confidence in the boat/conditions
 
ahah welcome to moth life.
i have a photo somewhere of painting my foils and lamimating the bladerider flaps in the kitchen, I would get killed by my girlfriend if I did this today :D

regarding the bridle, my 2c it is pretty important upwind. you have to set it so that at max kicker you get block to block and the boom is on centerline and not really moving. if for example you have it to loose on the right side, you easily lo9se 5 degrees upwind on starboard, cause the boom won't stay in the centerline when u go block2block.

the tradeoff you desctribe (main closeto centerline but with some margin in case of a light spot) is really vital to get good angles upwind. good guys have the mainsheet reeeeealy close to centerline and just play it few cm upwind. it comes with time and confidence in the boat/conditions
Thanks, makes sense. Ill have to pay closer attention to that now.
 




Top