California, once again, fuks the pooch

Gawd damn but can these idiots still not see how they continuously continue to fuk this state up? And on the same day that the latest poll puts Cali once again in the Top 5 of worse places to live and work?......

Dems seek state-run pensions for private workers

 

By JUDY LIN, Associated Press

 

Thursday, February 23, 2012

 

 

(02-23) 16:46 PST Sacramento, Calif. (AP) --

 

Two leading California Democrats introduced legislation Thursday that attempts to provide retirement savings for private-sector workers of modest means, creating a government-run program for private-sector workers whose employers do not offer pensions or 401(k) plans.

 

They said it could help an estimated 6.7 million California workers.

 

Sen. Kevin de Leon and Senate President Pro Tem Darrell Steinberg introduced SB1234, which would require employers with five or more workers to enroll them into what they have termed a "personal pension program" to be run by a state board. Their idea is to get small-business employees and hospitality workers who don't make much money to save more for their retirement.

 

"We must take action on the impending retirement tsunami," de Leon, of Los Angeles, said during a news conference in front of the state Treasurer's Office. "We cannot afford the rampant poverty and devastation that awaits us if we continue on our present course."

 

The lawmakers said they believed their program would be the first in which a state government established a retirement program for workers in the private sector. As a program with little or no precedent, several issues remain unsettled, such as whether California taxpayers would ever be on the hook if future investment returns failed to meet projections.

 

According to a draft, the bill would establish the Golden State Retirement Savings Trust, which would be administered by a six-member board. Private-sector workers would automatically have 3 percent of their earnings set aside in the trust, unless they opted out.

 

Unlike in an individual IRA or 401(k) account, their benefits — defined as their contributions plus earnings — would be guaranteed when they retire. The draft language does not specify how the earnings would be guaranteed.

 

Republican lawmakers warned that taxpayers or employers could wind up on the hook to cover any shortfalls if the government starts guaranteeing benefits to private-sector employees.

 

"Before we start discussing creating a new pension system, California needs to focus on the current pension crisis," said Sen. Mimi Walters, R-Lake Forest, vice chairwoman of the Senate Public Employment and Retirement Committee.

 

She noted the Democrats' proposal comes as Gov. Jerry Brown has proposed sweeping reforms to public employee pensions. The largest of those funds, the California State Public Employees Retirement System, is underfunded by at least $75 billion.

 

Unlike most retirement plans for private-sector workers, public employees receive a guaranteed pension for life that is not subject to the ups and downs of the stock market. CalPERS, for example, has the ability to take more money from the state's general fund to backfill for its investment losses.

 

Additionally, some public employee groups contribute nothing or only modest amounts to their pensions.

 

Walters dismissed the legislation as a way for Democrats to deflect attention from the problems with public pensions. Public employee unions are fighting against Brown's 12-point reform package and are key campaign supporters of Democrats.

 

De Leon said he believed California taxpayers would not be burdened by his private pension program. He said the board would be expected to invest conservatively, offering low earnings tied to long-term treasury rates.

 

"This is a minimal risk," de Leon said.

 

Steinberg, the Senate's leading Democrat, said the majority party is not running away from reforming public pensions.

 

"The challenge is not how we settle for an insufficient level of retirement for all Californians, whether they be public or private employees," he said. "The question is how do we bring everybody up to a responsible decent standard of living during their retirement years."

 

The draft bill said employers would not be forced to contribute to the retirement plans, but a summary of the legislation from de Leon's office leaves open the possibility for "companion legislation that requires employers to assist their employees in saving for retirement."

Read more: http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/n/a/2012/02/23/state/n150508S30.DTL#ixzz1nKQq3Pkh

 
Last edited by a moderator:

Saorsa

Super Anarchist
36,796
422
Gawd damn but can these idiots still not see how they continuously continue to fuk this state up? And on the same day that the latest poll puts Cali once again in the Top 5 of worse places to live and work?......

Dems seek state-run pensions for private workers

 

By JUDY LIN, Associated Press

 

Thursday, February 23, 2012

 

 

(02-23) 16:46 PST Sacramento, Calif. (AP) --

 

Two leading California Democrats introduced legislation Thursday that attempts to provide retirement savings for private-sector workers of modest means, creating a government-run program for private-sector workers whose employers do not offer pensions or 401(k) plans.

 

They said it could help an estimated 6.7 million California workers.

 

Sen. Kevin de Leon and Senate President Pro Tem Darrell Steinberg introduced SB1234, which would require employers with five or more workers to enroll them into what they have termed a "personal pension program" to be run by a state board. Their idea is to get small-business employees and hospitality workers who don't make much money to save more for their retirement.

 

"We must take action on the impending retirement tsunami," de Leon, of Los Angeles, said during a news conference in front of the state Treasurer's Office. "We cannot afford the rampant poverty and devastation that awaits us if we continue on our present course."

 

The lawmakers said they believed their program would be the first in which a state government established a retirement program for workers in the private sector. As a program with little or no precedent, several issues remain unsettled, such as whether California taxpayers would ever be on the hook if future investment returns failed to meet projections.

 

According to a draft, the bill would establish the Golden State Retirement Savings Trust, which would be administered by a six-member board. Private-sector workers would automatically have 3 percent of their earnings set aside in the trust, unless they opted out.

 

Unlike in an individual IRA or 401(k) account, their benefits — defined as their contributions plus earnings — would be guaranteed when they retire. The draft language does not specify how the earnings would be guaranteed.

 

Republican lawmakers warned that taxpayers or employers could wind up on the hook to cover any shortfalls if the government starts guaranteeing benefits to private-sector employees.

 

"Before we start discussing creating a new pension system, California needs to focus on the current pension crisis," said Sen. Mimi Walters, R-Lake Forest, vice chairwoman of the Senate Public Employment and Retirement Committee.

 

She noted the Democrats' proposal comes as Gov. Jerry Brown has proposed sweeping reforms to public employee pensions. The largest of those funds, the California State Public Employees Retirement System, is underfunded by at least $75 billion.

 

Unlike most retirement plans for private-sector workers, public employees receive a guaranteed pension for life that is not subject to the ups and downs of the stock market. CalPERS, for example, has the ability to take more money from the state's general fund to backfill for its investment losses.

 

Additionally, some public employee groups contribute nothing or only modest amounts to their pensions.

 

Walters dismissed the legislation as a way for Democrats to deflect attention from the problems with public pensions. Public employee unions are fighting against Brown's 12-point reform package and are key campaign supporters of Democrats.

 

De Leon said he believed California taxpayers would not be burdened by his private pension program. He said the board would be expected to invest conservatively, offering low earnings tied to long-term treasury rates.

 

"This is a minimal risk," de Leon said.

 

Steinberg, the Senate's leading Democrat, said the majority party is not running away from reforming public pensions.

 

"The challenge is not how we settle for an insufficient level of retirement for all Californians, whether they be public or private employees," he said. "The question is how do we bring everybody up to a responsible decent standard of living during their retirement years."

 

The draft bill said employers would not be forced to contribute to the retirement plans, but a summary of the legislation from de Leon's office leaves open the possibility for "companion legislation that requires employers to assist their employees in saving for retirement."

Read more: http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/n/a/2012/02/23/state/n150508S30.DTL#ixzz1nKQq3Pkh
Hey, whatcha bet that money gets invested in government bonds?

 

Saorsa

Super Anarchist
36,796
422
Don't be so quick to dismiss it. Here's the take on this sort of thing:

http://www.slate.com/blogs/moneybox/2011/12/28/social_security_is_the_best_investment_.html

The banks survived by the skin of their teeth last time. A lot of people are swearing on a stack of bibles not to ever let a bail-out happen ever again.
I believe that FDR proposed a program similar to this. Forced savings on the working class with help from the employers.

De Leon said he believed California taxpayers would not be burdened by his private pension program. He said the board would be expected to invest conservatively, offering low earnings tied to long-term treasury rates.
 

craigiri

Super Anarchist
8,434
143
Sarasota - W. MA.
shee-it, I thought you were gonna say that some dumb fuck had the idea to sell prisons, roads, bridges, pensions, social security, etc. to the private sector!

Whew!

 

Dawg

Moderator
7,862
1
I can see it now...California is too big to fail.
Cali is far bigger than Greece and they got a bail out.

I doubt it would be a mandatory program Booth.

Having said that, I feel safer with my Pension in Cal Pers than I do for my other 401k which still has not fully recovered. Ther is something to be said for grouping together.

I hate wall street and their condescending attitude towards the Middle Class, like they are so much better than us because the push paper and make money come from thin air.

Make sure you watch the Documentary......."Inside Job" narrated by Matt Damon. The only thing I can say is there are many people walking around (including Politicians) that should be placed in front of firing squads for "Economic Treason".

I still say we need as set of "Economic Treason" laws with mandatory sentences and no chance of parole until the sentence is complete. Hard Labor in the Nevada/Utah desert.

 

sumpin

Super Anarchist
4,672
9
San Miguel
all those living here that don't like are free to go.

ain't perfect and corrupt stupid people live everywhere

and why again is 401k someone else's fault. economies grow and contract everywhere, sometimes going big both ways. cities, counties, states, countries.

control your own chaos best you can

 




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