Can a C880 safely cross Nantucket Sound?

MultiThom

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Why would it not? I'd stay tied up in a Nor'easter, but it's only 30 miles end to end. I've sailed an F242 to the Farralones and back a bunch of times in big wind and waves (about 50 mile roundtrip)--and so have a lot of F27s, F28s, F25Cs, F31s, .... Fboats are built pretty robustly. Corsair boats are also built pretty well.
 

Canoer

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Why would it not? I'd stay tied up in a Nor'easter, but it's only 30 miles end to end. I've sailed an F242 to the Farralones and back a bunch of times in big wind and waves (about 50 mile roundtrip)--and so have a lot of F27s, F28s, F25Cs, F31s, .... Fboats are built pretty robustly. Corsair boats are also built pretty well.
So, even could be achieved in a Nor'easter. Nice.
 

smj

Member
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Our friends took us sailing on their borrowed 880 in the Keys 1.5 years ago. Fun boat to sail easily hitting 14+ kts under working sail area in a moderate wind and no feeling of uneasiness.
My long term plans were to eventually move to a folding trimaran when my arthritis got to a point where handling our cat would become cumbersome, but to be honest, our cat is easier to handle. Much of this is due to our cat‘s cockpit being large and all sail controls led back to the helmsman and the 800’s cockpit being rather small and cumbersome.....compared to our cat at least.
The 880 overall felt very seaworthy and forgiving.
 

MultiThom

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So, even could be achieved in a Nor'easter. Nice.
I'd get a year sailing in local races before sailing a Nor'easter, just to ensure you know what to do when something goes wrong (and racing will ensure something goes wrong while you learn the boat). Big waves are fun, surfing is cool, until it's not.

Here's a video of a really good race team in that area (Nantucket Sound), sailing a J29 monohull. He has other vids as well. Note the spin hoist at 8 minutes and the near knockdown at 845. You, in the 880 (and only one or two other people), would just fall off with no hu=hu. It does look like a nice place to sail--especially on a tri.

 
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SailingTips.Ca

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Lots of Farrier/Corsair boats have also sailed the VanIsle360 and Race to Alaska, both of which are about 650 NM and have plenty of exposed sailing and rough conditions.

You definitely want to spend a couple of years with the boat before you do something like that, but the boat is not the limiting factor for these.

They do sometimes break when crashing into logs at night, but none have sunk...
 

munt

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Nice vid. Good sailors! Reasonably good soundtrack! The original question makes me a bit queasy... If you don't know the answer maybe you need some time to reflect, ponder and study. IMHO the difference between the J29 and a similar sized F-boat is that the skill required to safely sail from point A to B (especially in windy conditions) is a lot higher on a tri due to the speed at which bad things can happen. To race the mono really well requires lots of skill too but if you're just sailing around, the mono's inherent stability and relatively slower movements require less skill. You can still make a big mess and kill people, just more slowly. A well-sailed 880 can handle more than most people would want to be sailing in. MutiThom could probly dig up some good Farallon vids (just be ready on the mute button).
 

MultiThom

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the difference between the J29 and a similar sized F-boat is that the skill required to safely sail from point A to B (especially in windy conditions) is a lot higher on a tri due to the speed at which bad things can happen. To race the mono really well requires lots of skill too but if you're just sailing around, the mono's inherent stability and relatively slower movements require less skill.
Sailing in large waves is also a bit different on a tri. Do'able but takes experience. Surfing down the face is exhilarating, being lifted by reinforced waves makes you feel on top of the world, but pushing your sprit into the backside of one is scary until you've done it a couple times (and learned how not to do it again). I chose the J29 vid because it is pretty much the same length as the 880 he's thinking about and-at least upwind-is close to the same speed in light to medium conditions. Besides, it is good to see a good crew working together.
 

SailingTips.Ca

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Victoria, BC
Sailing in large waves is also a bit different on a tri. Do'able but takes experience. Surfing down the face is exhilarating, being lifted by reinforced waves makes you feel on top of the world, but pushing your sprit into the backside of one is scary until you've done it a couple times (and learned how not to do it again). I chose the J29 vid because it is pretty much the same length as the 880 he's thinking about and-at least upwind-is close to the same speed in light to medium conditions. Besides, it is good to see a good crew working together.
Can you share some of your wave sailing techniques?
 

MultiThom

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Benicia, CA
Can you share some of your wave sailing techniques?
It's more of a feel for your boat and how it reacts. What works for a slow F242 is likely not applicable to a C880. Weight of the boat makes a difference, as well since a wave that might cause a F242 to slam down across the peak might not be much of a thing to a longer heavier boat. A long swell is a lot different than wind induced waves and when you get swell from one direction with wind induced waves from another you get wave reinforcement with deeper troughs and higher peaks, but the most caution must be observed when wave peak to trough gets to be half the length of your boat, then you have to pay closer attention to the direction you take down (or up) the face. But it is fun. I recall a benign race day with swell about 10 feet and spaced a couple boatlengths apart....going to weather I felt like I was getting a push down the backside of the waves. Hey, when single handing and no land in sight, you play with what you got.
 

Canoer

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I'd get a year sailing in local races before sailing a Nor'easter, just to ensure you know what to do when something goes wrong (and racing will ensure something goes wrong while you learn the boat). Big waves are fun, surfing is cool, until it's not.

You definitely want to spend a couple of years with the boat before you do something like that, but the boat is not the limiting factor for these.

The original question makes me a bit queasy... If you don't know the answer maybe you need some time to reflect, ponder and study. IMHO the difference between the J29 and a similar sized F-boat is that the skill required to safely sail from point A to B (especially in windy conditions) is a lot higher on a tri due to the speed at which bad things can happen. To race the mono really well requires lots of skill too but if you're just sailing around, the mono's inherent stability and relatively slower movements require less skill. You can still make a big mess and kill people, just more slowly.

Sailing in large waves is also a bit different on a tri. Do'able but takes experience. Surfing down the face is exhilarating, being lifted by reinforced waves makes you feel on top of the world, but pushing your sprit into the backside of one is scary until you've done it a couple times (and learned how not to do it again).

I've sailed rental Windrider17s at lakes. Friends invited me on 22 - 26 ft monohulls as guest / crew at the East Coast a couple of times. The one thing I took home with me from my sailing trips was the fact that lakes and oceans were completely different waters.

As soon as I manage to move to the Cape Cod area, I will find a sailing club. Possibly, a few seasons will pass sailing small keelboats of such clubs. Hopefully, in the meantime, I will be able to crew on bigger sailboats in various races as well. I know I have a lot to learn and experience before I can even imagine crossing Nantucket Sound singlehanded in any sailboat.

I asked this question, because I had watched many videos of C880, and in all, she was sailing in good winds over calm waters with a little or almost no waves. She seems to fly in those conditions. But what if the waves decide to mess with the captain a bit? I start to wonder if C880 will feel easy around bigger waves. Maybe, A 970 or a 37 (if she is still around) could be a better option - or even a monohull.
 
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MultiThom

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Why waste time now or wait? Find a sailing venue near you. Unless you live in Death Valley or the mountains of New Mexico, it is likely that there are sailors within a couple hour drive. Only way to gain experience is to do it (whatever "it" is).
 

Canoer

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Why waste time now or wait? Find a sailing venue near you. Unless you live in Death Valley or the mountains of New Mexico, it is likely that there are sailors within a couple hour drive. Only way to gain experience is to do it (whatever "it" is).
:cool:

Lakes are not the same. I still rent around whenever I can make the trip and time.
 

SailingTips.Ca

Feigns Knowledge
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Victoria, BC
I asked this question, because I had watched many videos of C880, and in all, she was sailing in good winds over calm waters with a little or almost no waves. She seems to fly in those conditions. But what if the waves decide to mess with the captain a bit? I start to wonder if C880 will feel easy around bigger waves. Maybe, A 970 or a 37 (if she is still around) could be a better option - or even a monohull.
I saw Francois Perus (designer of the 880) in a talk once and he said they did extensive testing of the 880 prototype in the waves off Hawaii, made some tweaks based on what they found, and were ultimately very pleased with the resulting big wave performance.
 

munt

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The belt
Buy a beachcat immediately. Just about any of em will do. Sail the crap out of it for a few years or till it is completely, hopelessly wrecked. Sail it in any and all conditions. Flip it, race it, hit the dock, hit the rocks, duct tape, epoxy, spray paint. Repeat. If you do so for 10 years you will be able to choose and properly sail your next boat. If you buy an expensive boat without having learned and properly paid your dues you will be a kook.
 

gbkersey

Member
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Austin, TX
Buy a beachcat immediately. Just about any of em will do. Sail the crap out of it for a few years or till it is completely, hopelessly wrecked. Sail it in any and all conditions. Flip it, race it, hit the dock, hit the rocks, duct tape, epoxy, spray paint. Repeat. If you do so for 10 years you will be able to choose and properly sail your next boat. If you buy an expensive boat without having learned and properly paid your dues you will be a kook.
Fate of the Mighty Merloe is a case in point...
 

SailingTips.Ca

Feigns Knowledge
790
342
Victoria, BC
Buy a beachcat immediately. Just about any of em will do. Sail the crap out of it for a few years or till it is completely, hopelessly wrecked. Sail it in any and all conditions. Flip it, race it, hit the dock, hit the rocks, duct tape, epoxy, spray paint. Repeat. If you do so for 10 years you will be able to choose and properly sail your next boat. If you buy an expensive boat without having learned and properly paid your dues you will be a kook.
Beach cats are wonderful training machines for multihull sailors, and I'd readily welcome any accomplished beach cat sailor aboard my multihull!!
 

Canoer

New member
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1
Buy a beachcat immediately. Just about any of em will do. Sail the crap out of it for a few years or till it is completely, hopelessly wrecked. Sail it in any and all conditions. Flip it, race it, hit the dock, hit the rocks, duct tape, epoxy, spray paint. Repeat. If you do so for 10 years you will be able to choose and properly sail your next boat. If you buy an expensive boat without having learned and properly paid your dues you will be a kook.
Yes! Will do. Case closed.

I have been abusing the rental Windrider17s on the lake, but it is not the same. I have to own a proper beach cat and sail it in the seas. A Hobie 16 or a Weta will be faster than the WR17.
 

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