Canoe stern - why?

Sidecar

…………………………
3,700
2,010
Tasmania
No one would design a pure, fast sailboat with a double-end.
Don’t say that to an International Canoe or 110 canoe aficionado.

Here is my 31 ft (double) canoe boat doing over 11 knots upwind. Top speed upwind to date is 12.7 knots. Singlehanded, and confident that there is more speed to come:



PS note the wake…..
 
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floater

Towards thee I roll..
5,700
1,149
quivira regnum
The boat was then banned from Transpac for the unusual design
what was so unusual? it honestly looks pretty fair compared to this Frers hull. But sure, if there ever was a canoe hull. the Caulkins 50 is it.
1677877191323.png
 

Great Red Shark

Super Anarchist
8,561
774
Honolulu
I tell you what - if you've ever lived aboard in a place where you Med-tie to a seawall and the breeze comes up from astern, you'll hear BOMBS going off under the transoms of some conventional sterns while the canoe-sterns just ride it out like a duck.

I know that's pretty situational, but when cruising, sometimes not insignificant.
 

Edik

Member
57
13
LA
Less volume down below.
Difficult swim ladder placement.
Difficult tender stowage.
Difficult getting on board in choppy conditions, when a wider stern provides a lee to waves.
Smaller aft cockpit.
Difficult access when stern-to docking.
Prone to hobby-horsing in sloppy conditions.
And there's more...

They're pretty though to my eye. Just wouldn't own one. Maybe a Perry Valiant or a Hans Christian though. Gorgeous boats.
Agreed. I've looked at Swanson 38 and I absolutely loved that boat...except that canoe stern and hence a tiny little cockpit...
 

sledracr

Super Anarchist
5,186
1,283
PNW, ex-SoCal
The Francis Lee around here is a vanity project and is remarkably slow for its length, with limited sail-carrying power and people-carrying volume.

That's a bit harsh. For a boat that was designed to be a "gentleman's day-sailor", I'm told it meets the owner's design goals quite nicely. And goes upwind at a comfortable 10k in light air with very little effort and virtually no wake.

Does it compare with (e.g.) a SC-70? Prob'ly not, but that was never the point.
 

Go Left

Super Anarchist
6,733
1,619
Seattle
That's a bit harsh. For a boat that was designed to be a "gentleman's day-sailor", I'm told it meets the owner's design goals quite nicely. And goes upwind at a comfortable 10k in light air with very little effort and virtually no wake.

Does it compare with (e.g.) a SC-70? Prob'ly not, but that was never the point.
That was pretty much my point earlier. Double enders get designed and built because the owner wants one.

Yeah, I was being a bit harsh.
 

Crash

Super Anarchist
5,583
1,436
SoCal
That was pretty much my point earlier. Double enders get designed and built because the owner wants one.

Yeah, I was being a bit harsh.
You were being more than harsh...and you were making an apples to oranges comparison. The Riptide 44 was built the way it was because that what it's owner wanted as well. The design briefs (requirements) were totally different. You really can't compare the 2 in any way, other than they are both sailboats. Kim seems very happy with Francis, so to be fair, you have to say the design met its requirements brilliantly....

Besides, fast in a sailboat is relative, as no sailboat is fast. Some are just less slow than others.

Did you know Bieker interned with Bob Perry?
 

Go Left

Super Anarchist
6,733
1,619
Seattle
You were being more than harsh...and you were making an apples to oranges comparison. The Riptide 44 was built the way it was because that what it's owner wanted as well. The design briefs (requirements) were totally different. You really can't compare the 2 in any way, other than they are both sailboats. Kim seems very happy with Francis, so to be fair, you have to say the design met its requirements brilliantly....

Besides, fast in a sailboat is relative, as no sailboat is fast. Some are just less slow than others.

Did you know Bieker interned with Bob Perry?
I did say exactly that. Not surprised Paul learned from Perry. No one better around here. I kind of wished Paul had learned how to draw a shearline from him. ;)
 

mckenzie.keith

Aspiring Anarchist
2,366
1,084
Santa Cruz
I tell you what - if you've ever lived aboard in a place where you Med-tie to a seawall and the breeze comes up from astern, you'll hear BOMBS going off under the transoms of some conventional sterns while the canoe-sterns just ride it out like a duck.

I know that's pretty situational, but when cruising, sometimes not insignificant.
This can happen also at anchor when the wind and current are contrary (and the current is substantial).
 

Autonomous

Turgid Member
4,796
1,980
PNW
I have a little 15' double ended skiff that has the usuable room of a boat two feet shorter.
My 17' transom sterned boat has twice the room.
 

TheDragon

Super Anarchist
3,649
1,694
East central Illinois
One more minor thing, and yes, I know most boats could do this, but most do not if they have a fat ass. I have a ladder over the side at roughly the anterior/posterior pivot point of the boat. As a result I can relatively easily go for a swim in even somewhat rough conditions and get back onboard, something I did every week on my Pacific crossing as well as on shorter passages between island groups. I talked with lots of other cruisers who crossed the Pacific last year and few swam even when conditions were relatively calm, because the stern of their boats was moving up and down too much to safely get back on board.
 



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