Canuckistan antifoul paint for PNW, what's the least shit this year?

267
90
Sooke, BC
As above really, we can't get any good stuff up here  and I don't know anyone travelling up from the US. Thoughts on Canadian-available paints for BC waters?

Micron CSC

Pettit Horizons

Pettit Ultima Hybrid

Aquaguard

Jotun Seaforce 200 AV

Union Jack

Something else...

Not racing, just want something that'll last a couple of years (no DIY yards left within 5 hours travel anymore). Anyone using any of the above and getting good results, or at least not-as-shit-as-expected? No real preferences on hard/ablative either, at least you can scrub hard stuff when it starts to loose effectiveness.

 

sailak

Super Anarchist
2,854
40
AK
My local yard introduced me to the novel idea of skipping the yachty stuff and going straight to what people that need to earn a living on the water use.   They use ablative from PPG.  I don't remember the exact name off hand but it wasn't fancy.  They say black works the best.  I used red  and after 2 years without a whole lot of use there is hardly a slime line.  

https://www.ppgpmc.com/Specialized-Products/Antifouling-Fouling-Release.aspx

 

IStream

Super Anarchist
10,715
2,921
Good idea in principle but the devil's in the details. What works on a ship at 20-30 kts won't work well for a slip queen or a sailboat that can't break 5 kts.

 

Je Prefere

Anarchist
926
4
pnw
this seems to work pretty well

IMG_0782.jpg

 

sailak

Super Anarchist
2,854
40
AK
Good idea in principle but the devil's in the details. What works on a ship at 20-30 kts won't work well for a slip queen or a sailboat that can't break 5 kts.
I should have clarified... The commercial fleet here consists of many 6-8 knot fishing boats, tenders etc and most sit at the dock at least as much.  The PPG ablative is what they use not the formulations for freighters and ferries.  

 

bait

Member
177
24
Over the past 30 years I have been involved in putting many thousands of gallons of anti fouling paint on all types of vessels up through 250 feet. I have seen all kinds of changes in the mix used from tin based to the popular copper based paints, now to the pesticide based paints. 

Couple years ago I had a pretty high profile motor yacht owned by one of the big nascar team owners hauled out for a bit of work. The only paint the captain would use was the Sherwin Williams paint. It was the least expensive paint on the market and was very popular with the commercial segment, as well as coast guard and Navy. When we hauled the boat the bottom was in great shape. 

Based on my past experience with all US domestic brands of anti fouling  paint the Seaguard is a very underrated paint. If I had a boat that was hauled yearly and in cooler water, I would think highly about putting this paint on the bottom. It is half the price of the high end, high performing paints from Petiti, Seahawk, or interlux.

i just do not know what mix of Seaguard you have access to up there in your part  of the world to know that it is the same paint I am familiar with.

you are in some pretty cold water and a short season I believe. So how bad can it be. A good water based paint from Pettit such as hydro coat should work well for you. While in warm waters like Floridait just does not perform as well. Hydro oat is pretty environmentally friendly compared to some of the other paints on the market.

 

Ishmael

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48,205
9,467
Fuctifino
We sail year round here, but the boats don't get nearly as much use in the winter, if any. The bigger problem is what paint is available in Canada, legally or otherwise.

 
267
90
Sooke, BC
The season up here lasts from Jan 1st to Dec 31st :) (mine gets used as much in the winter as the summer since I'm not a big girl's blouse).

Boat won't be hauled yearly as the nearest DIY yard will be 10 hours away. so the stuff needs to last.

We have Sherwin Williams up here, but I've never heard of their marine stuff, I'll try and get to one of their stores and see if anything is available.

 
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Jabber

Member
71
15
I have been using Petit Horizons for years. It's about a $190/gal but on my 30 footer one gallon would gave me 2 coats and would be good for 2 years easily, I guess the new boat will need a couple of gallons, but at least it lasts.

I really havent seen any reason to look for other options.

 
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alctel

Member
445
122
Victoria
Isn't there a place in Sooke that lets you work on your own boat? I did it around 4 years ago. It's not in the main harbour but close by it

 

Rain Man

Super Anarchist
6,926
1,884
Wet coast.
I have been using CSC for about 30 years.  It has pluses and minuses.  On the plus side it is easy to apply, will only allow slime to grow, can be over-coated after just a quick wet-sand even if it is a few years old, and it is very easy to clean from the dock with a dock brush or a quick jump in the water when the water warms up.  You can also haul the boat almost indefinitely without harming the paint.  On the minus side it is expensive, doesn't give a really smooth bottom like VC Offshore, takes about a month to "ablate" to a smooth surface, it allows slime to grow, and the shark white (which everyone wants to use) turns green if it is exposed to air.  I deliberately lowered my waterline by adding a black line (using Interlux Bottomkote, which doesn't mind being out of the water either) underneath my red bootstripe to solve the latter problem.

I get two years easily out of it.  My boat won the VIRS series last year on the second year of a CSC paint job.  I hired a diver frequently in the last few months but mainly to de-slime because the bottom had to be super clean for racing.

If you use it, go for at least two coats. On my 34' boat that takes 6 litres.  Roll the waterline and rudder with any leftovers to give the high wear areas extra coats if possible.

Don't scrub the boat in the water yourself unless you are wearing a full dive suit and mask.  Anytime I have swum in the clouds of paint in the water for any length of time I have felt a little ill for a couple of days afterwards.  I stopped doing that years ago.

Park the boat with the bow to the south so the rudder is hidden from the sun, if possible.

 
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