Cape Dory Typhoon or Bristol (Corinthian) 19 to learn the ropes?

ragha108

New member
21
5
New Jersey
Hello everyone! After months of research, and looking on what's available in my local marketplace, I have finally decided on the type of sailboat I want as my first boat. However I would love some inputs to help me in making the final decision

I am in between the Cape Dory Typhoon or the Bristol (Corinthian) 19

Basically same size boat, by same designer, one feet difference...Similar overall condition although the Corinthian was restored in 2005 I think. Both price fair, the Corinthian +1k parked in the hard while the Typhoon is currently in the water(slip)

The Typhoon is 1600 lbs lighter than the Corinthian! At first I thought that was the deal breaker question since I was hoping to get/be a trailerable sailor. However after further thinking I have convinced myself of getting a slip and focus on sailing as the first year rather than adding another variable to the equation such as trailering, rigging, launching, etc.

The Corinthian has a Space Index of 216 while the Typhoon 176. Not sure how significant that is. I have a wife and two daughters ages 11 & 13 which I am hoping they will join me in my adventures but most likely it will be me most of the time. Still the bigger the cockpit the better just in case I have company

The Corinthian has a Motion Index of 21.5 compared to 15 on the Typhoon. Not sure how noticeable that difference is but a less rocky or wobbly boat will certainly help getting my wife and kids on board, at least for the first year while they get used to it, assuming my sailing skills are not the cause of the wobbling, lol!

Whichever one may be the most forgiving that would be helpful. My intention is to learn the ropes with this vessel for a year or two or however long it takes before considering moving to a larger one for coastal cruising, overnighting, etc.

I am in New Jersey so sailing will be primarily on the Barnegat Bay or Raritan Bay. Don't know whether one would be better than the other for learning/enjoying so if you do please let me know.

Cabin size is not really a concern with this one purchase, unless you think it should be?

That pretty much sums it all. Probably overthinking it but I am curious to hear from people who may have had experiences in one or both boats.  

 

Steam Flyer

Super Anarchist
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Eastern NC
Don't get so hung up on "'''index's", just make sure to have a good running outboard engine and go have fun.
^ this^

The engine and the condition of the other major equipment will matter far more than any set of measurements, except possibly the comparative dimensions of the cockpit seat and your butt

FB- Doug

 

fastyacht

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I am a naval architect, and I have never once heard of either of those idices. Should I?

 

sailor-cfn

Member
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62
Everything on a boat eventually needs replacing, and replacing things on a boat is expensive.

Buy the one with the newer lines, rigging, sails, outboard, hardware, etc., even if it costs a bit more.  

If you buy a $3000 boat, and put another $3000 into it,  you can maybe sell it for $3300.  So try and find a $3300  boat where the previous owner just dumped 3 grand into it.

 

Foredeck Shuffle

Super Anarchist
Harbor 20
That's some funny shit.  Spin or non spin?

I installed beer holders and hanging cooler where the electric motor comes out for an owner of one when they first appeared in Annapolis some time ago.  I don't remember the sailing even though it was a decent sized OD, just that we barely had to do a thing except figure out how to stock a bigger cooler.

 

Foredeck Shuffle

Super Anarchist
Compare them by how easy the are to be in, the cockpit, the salon, and most importantly, how the rest of the family feels about the head.  Next most important but far below the former sentence is SA/D and how easy it is to reduce sail.  You want enough sail to have fun in the average conditions where you live but able to quickly reduce or remove sail when conditions become more spirited then you and family find comfortable.  sailor-cfn nailed it when he said look for a boat someone else has put money into.  I wouldn't touch a used boat that someone hasn't replaced something expensive or the price is low for the boat in general.  Oh, and all sails are worthless unless still wrapped in the plastic bag it came in from the sail maker.

 

Sail4beer

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Toms River,NJ
I’d suggest either for the bay. There are usually a number of Typhoons available locally. Have you considered the Ensign? There are a number of them around and they have the cockpit space for the family and a cuddy cabin.  If you take a few sailing lessons, the larger Ensign will provide more opportunity to get the family out and enjoy their new found hobby. 
 

Stick with the Barnegat Bay for learning and then you can sail the boat up to Raritan Bay and sail on the ocean.

 

fastyacht

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The only time I was ever knocked down  spreaders to the water on the S&S 42 footer I raced across the ocean happened in Raritan Bay. LOL.

 

accnick

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Compare them by how easy the are to be in, the cockpit, the salon, and most importantly, how the rest of the family feels about the head.  Next most important but far below the former sentence is SA/D and how easy it is to reduce sail.  You want enough sail to have fun in the average conditions where you live but able to quickly reduce or remove sail when conditions become more spirited then you and family find comfortable.  sailor-cfn nailed it when he said look for a boat someone else has put money into.  I wouldn't touch a used boat that someone hasn't replaced something expensive or the price is low for the boat in general.  Oh, and all sails are worthless unless still wrapped in the plastic bag it came in from the sail maker.
Excuse me?

These are 18-19' boats. There is no "salon", and you are lucky if there is a toilet. These are daysailers with a nominal shelter of a cabin, depending on the version of the Typhoon. 

The Typhoon is a great little boat for a new sailor, but it is really old-fashioned and not performance-oriented in any way.

 

Foredeck Shuffle

Super Anarchist
Excuse me?

These are 18-19' boats. There is no "salon", and you are lucky if there is a toilet. These are daysailers with a nominal shelter of a cabin, depending on the version of the Typhoon. 

The Typhoon is a great little boat for a new sailor, but it is really old-fashioned and not performance-oriented in any way.
Oh, then fuck it.  Get the one with the highest SA/D.

 

ragha108

New member
21
5
New Jersey
I’d suggest either for the bay. There are usually a number of Typhoons available locally. Have you considered the Ensign? There are a number of them around and they have the cockpit space for the family and a cuddy cabin.  If you take a few sailing lessons, the larger Ensign will provide more opportunity to get the family out and enjoy their new found hobby. 
 

Stick with the Barnegat Bay for learning and then you can sail the boat up to Raritan Bay and sail on the ocean.
Thank you @Sail4beer I have contemplated the Ensign too but I figured for a season or two a smaller and perhaps cheaper might be better for now

 

fastyacht

Super Anarchist
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Even my 505 has a salon. But a saloon? You need at least a Triton to even barely pretend to have a saloon.

 

Editor

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Staff member
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carlsbad
That's some funny shit.  Spin or non spin?

I installed beer holders and hanging cooler where the electric motor comes out for an owner of one when they first appeared in Annapolis some time ago.  I don't remember the sailing even though it was a decent sized OD, just that we barely had to do a thing except figure out how to stock a bigger cooler.
exactly!

 
The one with the self-bailing cockpit.  Seriously.  Less comfort, but much greater peace of mind both when you’re on the boat and when you leave the boat on the mooring.

Mind you, the Ensign is a very nice daysailer.  I spent much of my childhood on one.  I’ve also watched one sink in less than 2 minutes (cleated genoa, shift caught the boat aback and rolled the cockpit coming under—and down she went).

 
Hello everyone! After months of research, and looking on what's available in my local marketplace, I have finally decided on the type of sailboat I want as my first boat. However I would love some inputs to help me in making the final decision

I am in between the Cape Dory Typhoon or the Bristol (Corinthian) 19

Basically same size boat, by same designer, one feet difference...Similar overall condition although the Corinthian was restored in 2005 I think. Both price fair, the Corinthian +1k parked in the hard while the Typhoon is currently in the water(slip)

The Typhoon is 1600 lbs lighter than the Corinthian! At first I thought that was the deal breaker question since I was hoping to get/be a trailerable sailor. However after further thinking I have convinced myself of getting a slip and focus on sailing as the first year rather than adding another variable to the equation such as trailering, rigging, launching, etc.

The Corinthian has a Space Index of 216 while the Typhoon 176. Not sure how significant that is. I have a wife and two daughters ages 11 & 13 which I am hoping they will join me in my adventures but most likely it will be me most of the time. Still the bigger the cockpit the better just in case I have company

The Corinthian has a Motion Index of 21.5 compared to 15 on the Typhoon. Not sure how noticeable that difference is but a less rocky or wobbly boat will certainly help getting my wife and kids on board, at least for the first year while they get used to it, assuming my sailing skills are not the cause of the wobbling, lol!

Whichever one may be the most forgiving that would be helpful. My intention is to learn the ropes with this vessel for a year or two or however long it takes before considering moving to a larger one for coastal cruising, overnighting, etc.

I am in New Jersey so sailing will be primarily on the Barnegat Bay or Raritan Bay. Don't know whether one would be better than the other for learning/enjoying so if you do please let me know.

Cabin size is not really a concern with this one purchase, unless you think it should be?

That pretty much sums it all. Probably overthinking it but I am curious to hear from people who may have had experiences in one or both boats.  
hands down the corinthian is a better boat to sail..  the weekender is under powered...   the corinthian is a solid boat and is fun to sail..  I regularly sail mine  singlehand..     first thing to do is get some swivel cam cleats and mount them on the corners of the cabin top for the jib sheets, the cross cockpit sheeting is a pia and you really don't need the winches..   next thing to do is change out the dbl ended mainsheet system... currently the vogue in the fleet is single block on the traveler to a mid boom pivot cleat.. 

both boats have deck stepped masts and will require at least 2 people to drop...   I wouldn't consider either a boat   to be a trailer sailer...   the corinthian has a solid glass hull and a balsa cored deck..   the corinthian doesn't have a thru hulls so a bilge pump is a must..   the typhoon you'll have to hang the motor off the back, the corinthian has a motor well that can take a c30 minn kota trolling motor (bigger ones won't fit)  or up to 5 hp gas..

trust me, you'll have more fun in the corinthain... 

IMG_7744.JPG

 
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