CATARI comes along at Pacific Seacraft

Israel Hands

Super Anarchist
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Lucky guy! Did you take photos?
No, I was there with a friend who is getting a refit, and Steve was kind to take time to show us the boat. So we were busy talking and admiring. The photos at the beginning of this thread are exactly what she looks like today. Probably just like when you were here. Mahogany, walnut, teak trim so exquisitely and tastefully done. Dual cockpits. I couldn't afford one of the carbon fiber masts, let alone a year's operating budget (sigh).

 

Rasputin22

Rasputin22
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No, I was there with a friend who is getting a refit, and Steve was kind to take time to show us the boat. So we were busy talking and admiring. The photos at the beginning of this thread are exactly what she looks like today. Probably just like when you were here. Mahogany, walnut, teak trim so exquisitely and tastefully done. Dual cockpits. I couldn't afford one of the carbon fiber masts, let alone a year's operating budget (sigh).
So is PSC just doing refits these days? Any sign of any new boats in the works?  And you didn't have a phone with camera on you...

 

Israel Hands

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So is PSC just doing refits these days? Any sign of any new boats in the works?  And you didn't have a phone with camera on you...
Haha - it was an escape from the office - I didn't want to be tracked down so left the phone in the car!

PSC are building new boats and doing refits too. Not sure I saw every new boat there (there were several being refit) but at least 2 new ones were in the works.

 

Israel Hands

Super Anarchist
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coastal NC
:lol:  LOL you guys are a tough crowd. Let me put it this way- I live here in this small Southern town. It was good to meet PSC's owner (a super nice guy), hear stories about the company and boats, and discover friends we have in common. Why ruin the vibe by snapping a bunch of selfies to post for you 'cyber-friends?' And I was just a friend of the guy getting the refit. He's spending the money, and thus had the morning's spotlight.

CATARI still sits on this green hauling trailer, hull gleaming in a darkened area of the warehouse. We had to pull stairs over to her in order to climb aboard via the fold-down transom. Even uncovered, the boat is clean, and below decks are spotless and brightly lit. It looks just like the photos below from the original post. The interior photo looks aft, showing the galley to port, and steps up to the center cockpit which features a grated table on a hydraulic pedestal. I reckon it doubles as dining and sunning area. There is even a wine cellar. What a boat!

Edit: Photobucket won't let me copy those pics...you'll have to look at them on the original post of this thread.

http://i950.photobucket.com/albums/ad347/rhpbob/PSC63profile_zpsdb8bad6a.jpg

http://i950.photobucket.com/albums/ad347/rhpbob/PSC63int_zpse53bf89b.jpg

 
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accnick

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Lovely boat, but those round ports in the hull don't do it for my eye.

The interior joinerwork is the best: white with wood trim.

I love that early shot of BP et al sitting in the cockpit with the steering mock-up. This is what custom design and building is about to me: tweaking every little detail to get it right. Then tweaking it again.

It's no wonder it took me 10 years to build my own boat.

 

estarzinger

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Lovely boat, but those round ports in the hull don't do it for my eye.

.... This is what custom design and building is about to me: tweaking every little detail to get it right. Then tweaking it again.

It's no wonder it took me 10 years to build my own boat.
I love the boat, but the size growth over its evolution bothered me, I personally thought it ended up 'too big' for the owners purposes/comfort.

How did you deal with/manage potential size growth? When you consider and fine tune the details, they are always easier and better individually if you add a few inches or a foot here or there, but after enough evolution you have added 20' and the boat concept is now entirely different than the client originally intended.

 

accnick

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I love the boat, but the size growth over its evolution bothered me, I personally thought it ended up 'too big' for the owners purposes/comfort.

How did you deal with/manage potential size growth? When you consider and fine tune the details, they are always easier and better individually if you add a few inches or a foot here or there, but after enough evolution you have added 20' and the boat concept is now entirely different than the client originally intended.
I started out with a molded double-ended 40' hull. Even though I had looked at some larger designs, up to the Lyman Morse Seguin 44, the 40 was just big enough at the time, since I was solo.

However, I put a lot of equipment on it that was better-suited for a substantially larger boat, so it was not cheap to build.

If I were building a sailboat today, it would be something like one of Chuck Paine's Bermuda series boats, around 50' or so. Three people I know of have variations on those, one at 47', one at 53', the other at 62'. Another friend sailed an Apogee 50 to Cape Horn a few years ago.

The deckhouses on those really make sense to me, to be able to get in out of the weather while still having good visibility and a place to operate the boat from.

That general type ticks the boxes for me, with modern sail-handling equipment to make it practical for short-handed sailing. 

If you are going to put virtually the same equipment on a heavy 40-footer, you might as well build a 50-footer and make it easier to fit everything in. Plus, done properly you end up with a boat capable of faster passages, giving you more flexibility in voyage planning.

You aren't necessarily putting a lot more stuff in the bigger boat, but you usually end up with a bit more elbow room where you need it.

 
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