Cheap fast cheerful next step from sailboard?

Cubist

New member
29
1
Canada
I am picking up a weta and bringing it to Hamilton ON this weekend. Feel free to reach out to me if you want to try it.
That's great - I used to live an hour from there. Where did you find it?

Thanks for the offer - I do occasionally pass thorugh. From where will you launch?

 

Blaise

Member
168
70
Hamilton, ON
That's great - I used to live an hour from there. Where did you find it?

Thanks for the offer - I do occasionally pass thorugh. From where will you launch?
I have been looking at Craigslist throughout the midwest and kijiji. I guess I lucked out. According to the Canadian importer in Toronto, they sold quite a few, but most went to lake camps and were never heard of since then.

I will probably join the Burlington Sailing and Boating Club. Low key, convenient from where I am, affordable, friendly people.

 

RedTuna

Super Anarchist
4,837
1,243
Texas
Simple, stay as a windsurfer and buy a D2 from Onehundredboardz, then be the envy of everyone, everywhere.
Cool.  I didn't realize Division 2 boards were still around.  I got to play with one for a few hours in 89 or 90.  Since I have an 88 Mistral Equipe, I thought I'd be able to just jump on and go.  Humbling.

 

mundt

Anarchist
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322
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I've owned lots of multis and just sold my Weta.  Lots of great things about the Weta but I'd like something simpler so dinghies are of great interest to me at the moment.  The Fulcrum dinghy looks pretty darn good.  The Evo and a couple of the RS boats too.  

 

Cubist

New member
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1
Canada
The Fulcrum dinghy looks pretty darn good.
I had been looking at that, too. Simple and quick to rig are additional criteria that occurred to me - so that may narrow it down some. As I think about this more, a complex boat that takes more than 15 minutes to rig just doesn't make sense for me right now. Maybe one day, but not now.

 

mundt

Anarchist
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Even though I kept the Weta mast up and assembled it still took some time and effort to rig and sailing it was also pretty busy due to the 3 sails etc.  If you had to assemble and rig it every time you sailed (as well as disassembly) you would be putting in significant time and effort. I really like the idea of one, easy to use sail and a mast that’s super easy to step for one person. 

 

Speng

Super Anarchist
4,992
14
Cincinnati, OH
If I knew how to windurf and lived in a place with good conditions for it I'm not sure if any cheap and cheerful dinghy except maybe a beachcat can compare speed-wise

 

rcbrds

Member
69
40
Olympia
If I knew how to windurf and lived in a place with good conditions for it I'm not sure if any cheap and cheerful dinghy except maybe a beachcat can compare speed-wise
It is tough to beat windsurfing if your live in the right place.  I agree with your sentiment that you won't match the speed, but a lot of the pleasure of speed comes from being on the edge of control.  Cross-country skiing can be terrifying at 15 mph if your not very skilled like me.  Sailing a board in flat water at 40 knots feels fast, but so does planing a dinghy at 12 knots in choppy water.   I've gone from windsurfing to sailing a Flying Dutchman which has been a blast for me and my wife who also is a former short board windsurfer.  Its been a challenge with new things to learn even though we grew up sailing dinghies. The cool thing is we do it together.

 

CrazyR

Member
337
82
Not rich - Hobie 14 as easy single-handler. Hobie 16 as the boat to take a friend or two for a ride. Under $1000

I got my first generation wooden A-cat for $500. It wasn’t competitive, but it was a sweet and fast ride. Still very light and easy to rig. 
nacra 5.2, nacra 500, even Hobie 17, Nacra f17. Although these boats are a bit heavy for my likening. 

 

Cubist

New member
29
1
Canada
Not rich - Hobie 14 as easy single-handler. Hobie 16 as the boat to take a friend or two for a ride. Under $1000

I got my first generation wooden A-cat for $500. It wasn’t competitive, but it was a sweet and fast ride. Still very light and easy to rig. 
nacra 5.2, nacra 500, even Hobie 17, Nacra f17. Although these boats are a bit heavy for my likening. 
I have a soft offer of a ride in on a cat, early fall - so that should enlightening.

 

Rambler

Super Anarchist
1,123
722
East Coast OZ
I have a soft offer of a ride in on a cat, early fall - so that should enlightening.
A trapeze powered cat is going to be a lot faster. A trapeze powered anyting is faster than a boat that's not

There's always a trade off between weight, speed and durability.

A class cats are fast but can be fragile.

But you've mentioned your local club. Getting involved in a club and joining the races is a good way of maximising your enjoyment from a boat, learning to sail it better and having a good social time as well.

There's an old addage that you chose your club and then your boat. Turning up with a cat to a club that presently only has monos is not going to get the best out of your membership or participation.

 

fastyacht

Super Anarchist
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There's an old adage that you chose your club and then your boat. Turning up with a cat to a club that presently only has monos is not going to get the best out of your membership or participation.
There is a lot of truth to this. But in the U.S., dinghy sailing is balkanized and so diminished from the 70s. The exception to this is to choose a class that you can find many events at within a reasonable distance. For me, luckily, two of these classes happened to be both a long time favorite to race since the 80s, and the other a lifelong dream---505 and canoe, respectively.

Other examples of classes to choose from would be for instance a Shields if you live in R.I., a Viper 640 or an F-18 cat in southern New England, or a Thistle if you live in Ohio or pretty much anywhere in PA or NJ or a number of other regions around the country. In other areas the Snipe or the Windmill will have a variety of events to get to etc.

For me, I have no club near me that sails the favorites, so I sail yet other boats at my club. Right now I have 4 sailboats! Partly that is because dinghies are cheap almost free much of the time.

 

Cubist

New member
29
1
Canada
My Dad makes the same point - race what people race at your club.  Seems as though all roads lead to Laser. Another interesting thought struck me a few weeks ago: Maybe this solo thing is misguided. I started looking at what OD keelboats were being raced at my club and thought about forming a 'syndicate' with some of my WS fleet-mates. Some already have keelboats for cruising, but I proposed that three or four of us come together and purchase one of the cheaper locally raced OD boats expressly for the purpose of racing it. There was some initial interest, but it kind of waned. I'm back now to looking at dinghies. I have also realized that flat our speed is not necessary. I have windsurfing for blasting about.

Thanks all responders for the suggestions and insights - they've really helped me surface the options.

 

dogwatch

Super Anarchist
17,244
1,798
South Coast, UK
So you want to go fast.

Sitting/hiking, consider a foiler - UFOs and Waszps -- and while not as cheap as a 2nd hand laser, you can find some opportunities. 

If you are up for trapezing, options include a Musto Skiff, Swift Solo, or single-hand a 29er. 

There are some sitting/hiking skiffs (RS 100).

All these discussed in this forum aplenty.
All of those are a hell of a learning curve for someone currently sailing a board. At least as a direct step. A high probability of discouragement, IMO. I know a pretty skilled long-board racer who attempted the transition to a Musto Skiff. "How hard can it be?" he thought. He found out. Now sailing easier boats.

 
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dogwatch

Super Anarchist
17,244
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South Coast, UK
My Dad makes the same point - race what people race at your club. 
Yes, if racing is what you want to do. If you haven't tried it, you may not really know. I transitioned from short board blasting and long board racing to dinghies and keelboats in my late 20s. Having awareness of wind and currents is helpful, otherwise there's less cross-over of skills than you might think. Some race fleets (by no means all) can contain quite aggressive people and this can be off-putting if you don't like that aspect of sport (I don't much). My advice, FWIW, is to crew a few different types of boats and get a feel for what you most enjoy.

 
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Presuming Ed

Super Anarchist
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London, UK
All of those are a hell of a learning curve for someone currently sailing a board. At least as a direct step. A high probability of discouragement, IMO. I know a pretty skilled long-board racer who attempted the transition to a Musto Skiff. "How hard can it be?" he thought. He found out. Now sailing easier boats.
Sounds like a grumpy soul. 

 




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