Christmas Regatta

jaysper

Super Anarchist
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Wellington
20 minutes ago, nav said:


That was fun to watch, Deano always was a good starter.

But it lacks the same excitement of lead mines doing the same thing because close on a lead mine is 10m, close on an AC75 is 100m.

 
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sailer99

Member
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62
Canada
13 hours ago, Zaal said:


From another thread. Bruni confirms that umpires can give multiple penalties for intentional fouls. I'm fairly satisfied that this won't be an issue in the meaningful races as the umpires will definitely be watching for it.

 

barfy

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That was fun to watch, Deano always was a good starter.

But it lacks the same excitement of lead mines doing the same thing because close on a lead mine is 10m, close on an AC75 is 100m.
And the entire dance would have taken long enough for two beers gramps.

 

nav

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Onboard action from the 'Sterncams', great audio, close action, lots of 'issues'...




 

nav

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569
It's interesting, the moaning here about these non-leadmine boats and how bad they are at 'match racing. It seems to me that an issue is that they get into (and out of contact) so fast that for the crew and the umpires to predict and determine what will/has happened becomes a bit arbitrary. At 10kn you could very accurately place your bow say within a meter or 2 of the other boat, with a fairly predictable outcome, both in terms of (hopefully non- ) contact and penalties. Now not only do you have to deal with invisible virtual extremities to the 2 boats but also have maybe only a quarter of the time to make judgements, along with virtually no boat on boat practice  :blink:

Speaking of umpires - I wasn't really convinced the Richard Slater was taking it all that seriously but that may be just the way he comes across, or because of the issues created by the rule set and the speed?

 
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sailer99

Member
90
62
Canada
It's interesting, the moaning here about these non-leadmine boats and how bad they are at 'match racing. It seems to me that an issue is that they get into (and out of contact) so fast that for the crew and the umpires to predict and determine what will/has happened becomes a bit arbitrary. At 10kn you could very accurately place your bow say within a meter or 2 of the other boat, with a fairly predictable outcome, both in terms of (hopefully non- ) contact and penalties. Now not only do you have to deal with invisible virtual extremities to the 2 boats but also have maybe only a quarter of the time to make judgements, along with virtually no boat on boat practice  :blink:

Speaking of umpires - I wasn't really convinced the Richard Slater was taking it all that seriously but that may be just the way he comes across, or because of the issues created by the rule set and the speed?
I think he is taking it seriously but is just a calm guy. Most good umpires I've met are very calm and analytical, which is what you need in high pressure and marginal situations. The umpires also get the dream setup for this cup, the computerized overhead views and boat telemetry make calls significantly easier.

 

nav

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Yep fair enough, good insight. What do you think of the size of the protective virtual diamonds around the boats, the sizes of the circles at the marks and the 'size' of the penalties compared to the speeds and handling capabilities of the boats?

 

accnick

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Speaking of umpires - I wasn't really convinced the Richard Slater was taking it all that seriously but that may be just the way he comes across, or because of the issues created by the rule set and the speed?
Mr. Slater takes his job VERY seriously. He is just preternaturally quiet and calm. He is also the author of the RRSAC  (Racing Rules of Sailing, America's Cup, America's Cup Edition), and has been instrumental in adapting rules meant for Archimedian sailing to the world of high-speed foiling for both match racing and fleet racing.

These umpires are as good as they come. They practice just like the sailors, they go over every decision they have made at the end of the day. When and if they make mistakes, they learn from them.

They are not just there for the beer.

(confession: I have worked with or against all of them in one capacity or another over the years, and have nothing but respect for them.)

 

sailer99

Member
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62
Canada
Everything seems fairly well balanced to me, but we haven't seen enough racing to see edge cases. The diamond is a fairly good safety compromise, and closing speeds are relatively low in situations where the diamond matters. Any incident with high closing speeds will involve a duck or cross and the diamond doesn't really change how those are approached. The diamond comes into play during windward-leeward situations where the boat speeds are usually with 5-10kts of each other. I think it forces the keep clear boat to be a bit more conservative than you will see during lower speed racing, which is what you want. The zones are small if you consider the time boats spend in the zones, but, as with most high-performance classes, the sailors have planned what they will do well before getting near the zone.

I'm torn on penalty distance still, but hopefully, we don't see enough penalties for us to really know if the distance is correct.

 

Tropical Madness

Super Anarchist
18 hours ago, nav said:

Onboard action from the 'Sterncams', great audio, close action, lots of 'issues'...


Yeah and somehow the telecast needs more of this view to show how cray these beasts really are - i cant even imagine the scale of a collision even in pre-start...

 




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