Circuit Breaker Question

Chris in Santa Cruz CA

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earths surface
I pulled big wire through conduit in my crawl space to serve the kitchen and landed it in a sub panel to feed the kitchen. I wouldn’t characterize it as……fun.  :lol:
We were running it a long ways but easy run underground from the main house to the first outbuilding 100 feet away. I still have partially done plumbing main line needing crawl space work, 5 years old now. No more crawlspace for me!

 

Chris in Santa Cruz CA

Super Anarchist
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984
earths surface
I pulled big wire through conduit in my crawl space to serve the kitchen and landed it in a sub panel to feed the kitchen. I wouldn’t characterize it as……fun.  :lol: View attachment 501635
Ahhh memories of the high torque low speed right angle drill with the 1.25 inch auger bit in it. Don’t need it often but when you do…you’re missing some of the metal plates but I am sure you just weren’t done yet :)

 

Cal20sailor

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Detroit
Back to the OP, be careful.  I don't get out much and still have two pro electricians that would do it at cost and many beers at my place.  I would not be comfortable doing this for someone and maybe not for myself.  I think it's great you're helping someone in need.  If you do a go fund or provide a PayPal address, I'll contribute.  My mom's approaching 93 but has me.

 

Jules

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Punta Gorda
Sorry for my ignorance, but I need to find out if a 40 Amp 240v circuit breaker running an electric oven/range can be replaced with two 20 AMP single pole circuit breakers ganged together.

I'm trying to help out an elderly neighbor, but her stuff is very old and she can't afford to replace the entire panel.

The panel is antique, and finding replacement breakers is difficult.

While the brand is different, can I replace something like this:



with something like this?

There is no difference between the two breakers.  They both trip both legs simultaneously.  That's very important so one leg doesn't remain live and creates a backfeed to the load.

I've seen panels where a stiff wire is laced through the holes in the switch and folded over, sort of a Rube Goldberg 2-pole breaker.  But I've also seen where only one leg trips.  Way back when I remember you could buy that bar seen across the two switch handles in the above picture.  That worked a lot better than the looped wire.

Whatever you do, make sure both legs of the breaker trip simultaneously.  This is a must.

 

Charlie Foxtrot

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Floriduh
Is the original Square D? If so, Schneider likely still makes that 40 amp one. It has to snap in correctly, usually can't cross brands. I needed some really weird breakers in the Square D slim tandem format, but I couldn't find them at the home stores. I went to the Square D dealer. Call this guy, I bet he has the one you need in stock, and the company is employee owned ...

Mike Smith
Dealers Electrical Supply
Denver
303-592-2800
[email protected]

If he asks who sent you, I'm a friend of the late Kurt, the mechanic on Downing.
Back in the when, there were jobbers that would deal in "obsolescent" electrical hardware.  Saved my over-ample assets several times when working the older buildings and shops (Flapper Era) in downtown LA. They came in handy when I was restoring my early '50s house in the hood.

Bet you could find them on the interwebs.

 
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Jules

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Punta Gorda
Ahhh memories of the high torque low speed right angle drill with the 1.25 inch auger bit in it. Don’t need it often but when you do…
I've got an old Milwaukee right angle drill and some Planetor bits.  Made a lot of holes with that combo.  Planetor bits were great.  A sharp bit could eat through anything wood almost effortlessly. 

One time I was drilling a 2x4 that had a panel tub on the other side.  I was aiming for a KO in the tub and trying to be careful to stop before I hit metal.  Oops!  Too late.  The bit caught the metal, and the handle, with my hand firmly attached, swung up and I ended up punching myself in the chin.  Didn't know I had such a mean uppercut.

 

Point Break

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Long Beach, California
Ahhh memories of the high torque low speed right angle drill with the 1.25 inch auger bit in it. Don’t need it often but when you do…you’re missing some of the metal plates but I am sure you just weren’t done yet :)
Yep

Who sweated the plumbing joints?  Ugly or am I missing something?  If they work, that's all that matters.
Those ugly things are mine…….and yes they work.  :lol:

 

Point Break

Super Anarchist
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Long Beach, California
why the glass brick?


image.jpeg

image.jpeg

 

Iain A

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Solomons/Pax Rvr
60 yo home, Old panel " Wadsworth" had to order breaker specific to this manufacturer through supply house, Square D or equivalent no workie...

 

DarthSailor

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260
+1 on the beauty of your kitchen, I am also jealous of the Dutch door, had one growing up and have always wanted one as an adult(pocket doors too). My wife would have issues with light height as we are both 6'+ and she hates staring into lights hung at her eye level(or close to it). Most heard complaint while watching HGTV/DIY/Magnolia/this old house after color and countertop choice. 

 

Cal20sailor

Super Anarchist
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Detroit
PB, please fix the alignment of the the three pics on the left.  I don't think I'm OCD, but that's just bad.  If it's just a case of banging my hot wife or worrying about alignment, forgiven.

 
There is no difference between the two breakers.  They both trip both legs simultaneously.  That's very important so one leg doesn't remain live and creates a backfeed to the load.

I've seen panels where a stiff wire is laced through the holes in the switch and folded over, sort of a Rube Goldberg 2-pole breaker.  But I've also seen where only one leg trips.  Way back when I remember you could buy that bar seen across the two switch handles in the above picture.  That worked a lot better than the looped wire.

Whatever you do, make sure both legs of the breaker trip simultaneously.  This is a must.
WHOLEY FUCK BATMAN

a 40 Amp 220 Breaker is a pair of 40 Amp Breakers Locked together so if one leg trips it kills the other

a pair of 20 Amp breakers makes a 20 Amp 220 Breaker (But Only if switches are bridged)

if you Don't Fully/Completely understand That yer Not qualified to reset a breaker if tripped

 

Ventucky Red

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One of my long time friends is a master electrician and lives .8 miles away. Has helped me many times. I can run Romex and wire up 4 gang switch boxes and gfci sockets etc. if has to do with a box, circuit design/gauge, or breaker, he gets called and he gets paid. The code exists for a reason and that reason is fire. Fire is bad. He not only knows the code he knows what you should do beyond the code so you never have to think about it again. Running 220 out to an out building to do x? Design the circuit for 2x or 3x just in case a potter wants to put in a kiln or someone wants to weld. Running it underground? Oversized conduit and leave a fish line in it in case someone wants to pull tv cable or cat 6 or just run it all at once one time. Pulling cable is fun.
When it comes to electrical stuff, it pays to be conservative and future thinking.. 

Right now, I have four runs (circuits) that are wired from the service panel to a junction box in the attic two using 12 gauge (yellow) wire, and two using 14 gauge (white).  They will probably never be used, but the cost at the time when the new panel was being put in was $50.00  Maybe in the future with a kitchen remodel or recessed lighting etc...  it will make the job a lot easier.

As for being conservative, if the code says 10, go no more than 5.  Insurance companies get real weird when it comes to electrical fires, especially with new construction/installation.

 
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