Coffee

sculpin

Super Anarchist
+1 on forgetting stuff onboard.  We've owned our boat 11 years, and this year I did a big purge and tossed a lot of stuff that hadn't been used in 10 years.  I've also established the "work on the boat" kit that can travel, instead of leaving a 200 piece socket wrench kit on board all summer.  There is more work to be done though, I will leave a brush for scrubbing the deck but we've never used both of them so one can go home...

I did take the coffee percolator off the boat when we bought the Aeropress, but we also bought a grinder at the same time, so still a net weight gain...

 

view at the front

Super Anarchist
1,550
209
Anacortes, WA USA
Coffee. . . I have lots of stories.

My son was the Marketing Director of Terra Facciano Italiano Coffee, then Seattle's Best Coffee, and later for a division of Starbucks.
 
Our next door neighbor is the former CEO of Starbucks. . . the GOOD Howard.  Howard said that one of the worst things that Starbucks ever did was to kill off the Terra Facciano Italiano Coffee brand, it was absolutely the best.  
 
Howard's $10k machine makes really good coffee, and we have really good coffee available in the neighborhood.  My son says that if you have good coffee, you could drink it at any temperature, which I do.  I tend to use a cone and filter, although I can even drink VIA's and Folgers under duress.
 
We have Nespresso machines both at home and in the motorhome that my wife loves.
 
 
@estarzingerWhat's your take on the coffee from the moca pot?  We typically make a latte style coffee.  We have the 4 cup model and it makes 4 nice lattes.

Keeping crap off the boat is a constant battle.  I have tried to institute a one-on one-off policy, but the Admiral and crew seem to find ways past this rule.

At the end of this season we are hauling the boat somewhere new for a bit of work.  I am going to use this as an excuse to empty everything off the boat.  Every locker.  Every drawer.  Under every floor board, berth, etc.  Cockpit lockers.  Everywhere.  Then in the next spring what ever I haven't thrown-out/donated/etc will be carefully examined before being allowed back onboard!

 

estarzinger

Super Anarchist
7,630
1,018
@estarzingerWhat's your take on the coffee from the moca pot? 

We typically make a latte style coffee.  We have the 4 cup model and it makes 4 nice lattes.
I am still dialing in the coffee and grind a bit, but it is my favorite brew atm - rich strong coffee with no silt.

How much milk by volume is in a lattee?  Edit - looks like google says 1:5 or 1:6 by volume, so yes, I exactly see how you get 4 perfect lattee's out of this.

I just made a brew in 4 cup pot - This is the entire output in an American size mug*.  I will add like two table spoons of half and half.  I'm not complaining at all - it is terrific - I just think American's thinking which size pot to buy need some frame of reference or they may be put off.

IMG_0420.jpg

* edit: and yes, I fill to just below the valve.  I do pour it immediately as it starts to sputter so I do miss a tiny bit of volume from early pour but I think that keeps the flavor best. and yes, I just double checked that is the 4 cup pot.

 
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Ajax

Super Anarchist
14,811
3,084
Edgewater, MD
Ajax - btw, I think you are the only one here who has sailed with me on Hawk.  I feel a bit of responsibility to get you started off properly.  Pls dont take my hmmm directness as any sort of criticism - it is all offered with the best feelings and intentions.

There is a lot that consumer culture has to answer for, and sailing with the proper mindset can put a lot of that right.

Also you should be aware that there is a well known quantum mechanics phenomena with sail boats - they are way bigger on the inside than on the outside (at least the good ones). In part that is a good thing because many look tiny and hopeless for long distant cruising from the outside, but it is also a bad thing because a metric shit ton of stuff can get socked away and forgotten.
I have never forgotten what you told me-

That many cruisers try to bring their dirt life with them (and all of the accoutrements), rather than embrace the life of sailors and its freedom from material possessions and consumerism. (paraphrasing)

I'm bringing a laptop for navigation and planning. Practically everything else onboard is related to sailing, maintenance and repair.  I'm bringing 2 seasons of clothing- warm and cold, which will take up some space. (I'm a little paranoid about hypothermia after getting badly chilled during an overnight race in August.)

I have a couple of cast iron skillets and a pressure cooker in the galley. I've avoided single purpose kitchen gadgets as best I can (maybe I'll leave that moka pot behind). I'm bringing a small bottle of rum for myself and 1-2 bottles of wine to give as gifts to people that I might run into.

I've set aside a good sized locker for provisions along with the 'fridge. I have prepared healthy snacks and fruit that I can eat one-handed in bad weather that require no preparation.

 

Ajax

Super Anarchist
14,811
3,084
Edgewater, MD
no no no - AJAX - keep extra shit off your boat! 

This is a battle you need to win.  Focus, fight the reflex to bring that one thing.

Seriously.

Only one coffee maker.

You look at each individual piece and think 'that is small it will not matter' but then a year later if you empty the boat you have a ton of excess crap on the dock which in fact does make all sorts of difference.

I'm looking out for you here.  I'm the angel on your shoulder saying - no  :)   Don't listen to than guy with the pitch fork on your other shoulder.
Ok, no burr grinder and one coffee pot. I have ground coffee but you have to let me bring the vaccuum canister. ;)

 

Elegua

Generalissimo
@Ajax the only things I'd add to your list is a Kindle an iPod and a pack of cards / backgammon / some kind of game. Nothing like settling down in the evening or a quiet watch with a book or a rainy lay-day with tea and a couple rounds of backgammon. 

 

estarzinger

Super Anarchist
7,630
1,018
@Ajax the only things I'd add to your list is a Kindle an iPod and a pack of cards / backgammon / some kind of game. Nothing like settling down in the evening or a quiet watch with a book or a rainy lay-day with tea and a couple rounds of backgammon. 
cards . . lol . . . after our 6 months at sea Beth told me I was not talking enough/we were not interacting enough - she offered a choice - an hour conversation each day or card games. I picked the card games, and she proceeded to beat me 99% of the time for like the next 3 months. I gradually shifted the game to more chance oriented and she still beat me.  I HATE losing, so I finally threw in the towel and said I was ready for deep and meaningful conversations lol.

 

Elegua

Generalissimo
cards . . lol . . . after our 6 months at sea Beth told me I was not talking enough/we were not interacting enough - she offered a choice - an hour conversation each day or card games. I picked the card games, and she proceeded to beat me 99% of the time for like the next 3 months. I gradually shifted the game to more chance oriented and she still beat me.  I HATE losing, so I finally threw in the towel and said I was ready for deep and meaningful conversations lol.
:D      Only after all other options have been explored.  Fortunately my wife and I are fairly evenly matched when it comes to games.  In almost everything else she has me beat cold.  I tend to get lost in my head, so I appreciate, (if grudgingly at times), someone who is, "on", most of the time.   

 

Ajax

Super Anarchist
14,811
3,084
Edgewater, MD
@Ajax the only things I'd add to your list is a Kindle an iPod and a pack of cards / backgammon / some kind of game. Nothing like settling down in the evening or a quiet watch with a book or a rainy lay-day with tea and a couple rounds of backgammon. 
My smartphone serves as my music storage. Funny you should mention it, I have a Kindle sitting in my Amazon cart. I'll purchase it tomorrow (payday).

We have several compact games onboard- Cribbage (the traditional submariner's pastime), UNO (great for causing temper tantrums in adults and children alike) and a compact, travel Scrabble set. So far, our preference is Scrabble. My wife used to fret that my vocabulary was larger than hers, but there's only so much you can do with "QYYAPDC." Random chance has favored her several times.

 

Max Rockatansky

holy fuckfarts!
3,846
985
My smartphone serves as my music storage. Funny you should mention it, I have a Kindle sitting in my Amazon cart. I'll purchase it tomorrow (payday)
Save yourself the extra money and device: install the (free!) Kindle software on yer phone. 

 
Not a coffee snob, more of an addict/fiend with good taste, I think I've been through them all, at least the non-electric ones (and most of those, too). AeroPress, Moka, Bialetti, French presses, drips, etc etc., and after all that 'market research', I think the Presse by Bobble is the most bestest sailboat coffeemaker I have used.

Easy cleaning with very simple stainless construction, the main cup/body is double walled which keeps coffee warm, and obviates the need for a space-taking handle. Compact in size, the filter element is reusable, stainless, and stows inside the cup. The cup can also be used solo for any other drink hot or cold. It needs minimal water for clean up, can't break, has no dementia-causing aluminum in it (is that still a 'thing'?).

I long ago lost the lid part, but I make a strong brew (usually using Cafe Bustelo, or similar) and pour off from the Bobble into small ~4 oz SST double walled cups. These little cups bleed the brew heat just enough that I can start drinking it straight away after making a 'pot', and being so small they don't have enough surface area inside to allow much mess-making slosh effect when the boat is moving. The Presse makes about 2.5 of these per brew.

I'm not affiliated, just a fan of the products.

Bobble 'Presse' - https://www.amazon.com/Presse-bobble-Tumbler-Stainless-Portable/dp/B07121GNCM

Small Camping cups - https://www.ebay.com/itm/113986163435

 
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I have, but the screen is small for long reading sessions and the sunlight washes it out.  Everyone raves about the Kindle paperwhite.
Seconded, thirded, etc... I read 2-3 books weekly, and though I do have phone/tablet/dead tree access, the Kindle is the best experience overall and well worth the price, especially if you buy a refurb unit. I have a PW now (for the backlight and waterproofness), but owned two other earlier versions.

 

Ajax

Super Anarchist
14,811
3,084
Edgewater, MD
Seconded, thirded, etc... I read 2-3 books weekly, and though I do have phone/tablet/dead tree access, the Kindle is the best experience overall and well worth the price, especially if you buy a refurb unit. I have a PW now (for the backlight and waterproofness), but owned two other earlier versions.
Yeah, I want it for the waterproofness. 

 

Max Rockatansky

holy fuckfarts!
3,846
985
I’ve had the AP for something like five years, but if I’d heard of that bobble I sure would have gone for it. That is mo clever

 

Jim in Halifax

Super Anarchist
1,676
751
Nova Scotia
So I get the cool tech with Aeropress, bobble, whatever, but what is the aversion to making a whacking great pot of coffee? One of the reasons I favour a percolator on my boat is that upon completion of brewing I have four solid cups of coffee on my stove. Sometimes the wife and I even make a second perc, especially if we are rafted with another coffee lover who has only a tiny french press... these machines seem too dainty for my coffee appetites.

 
So I get the cool tech with Aeropress, bobble, whatever, but what is the aversion to making a whacking great pot of coffee? One of the reasons I favour a percolator on my boat is that upon completion of brewing I have four solid cups of coffee on my stove. Sometimes the wife and I even make a second perc, especially if we are rafted with another coffee lover who has only a tiny french press... these machines seem too dainty for my coffee appetites.
As a singlehander, one 'Bobble-full' is usually all I'll drink in the AM. If I want more, or have company, it only takes 3-4 minutes to hot up some H2O for another. Never have to drink old, oxygenated brew that way, is what I like most about it. I also prefer my brew to rank just below espresso on the 'strong, dark' scale. :) Being able to make it single serve also keeps wastage to a minimum; I go through an 11.5 oz bag of grind in two weeks, give or take.

 




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