composite floor boards?

Bowchow

Anarchist
615
13
Looking for a solution to re make an existing floorboard set up on a 38' racer cruiser (mostly racer). Floorboards are typical teak/holly at the moment and have seen better days. About 1/2" thick, so we have some room to play with.

Was debating starboard, but another boat I work on has this and there is a decent amount of flex. Just seeing if anyone else has done anything similar that isn't crazy expensive (time and cost wise)



View attachment IMG_4672.jp2

 
Last edited by a moderator:

12 metre

Super Anarchist
3,943
739
English Bay
Starboard would be about my last choice.  Relatively heavy and expensive, lots of flex, hard to keep clean I would suspect.

Back in the days of the Boeing Surplus store, I believe some people were able to buy thin carbon/nomex panels for exactly this purpose (and other cool stuff) for quite cheap.  Which I suppose isn't really relevant these days because Boeing closed the store down several years ago.  They still have an on-line store, but seldom does anything worthwhile come up IMO, or maybe it just gets snapped upped immediately.

 
Last edited by a moderator:
PLywood is easy to make, but has limited life, as you’ve learned.

I’d consider planks of a decay resistant solid wood like Teak and other tropical hardwoods will serve well.  THey’re heavy.  The cedars are decay resistant, lighter and less speedy.  Alaskan yellow cedar, unfinished, would be my choice. 

 

RImike

Super Anarchist
1,031
124
Newport RI
Do you want the wood look or do you want to to do away with wood all together? 

It all comes down to cost per square foot. Fiberglass covered foam core (1/2") will cost about $15 per square foot in materials and probably the same in labor all considered. if you did it yourself it would be less. 

 

Max Rockatansky

holy fuckfarts!
3,846
985
Boat is 27 years old, still has her Divinycell/Lonseal laminate boards. They a bit beat up but still going strong (and light). Not sure what they used to laminate them together. 

 

Rasputin22

Rasputin22
13,915
3,470
bluewater2.jpg


Coosa BlueWater 26 lbs per cu ft

Just paint this stuff and add some non-skid. 30% lighter than plywood. Cut and route with woodworking tools.

Coosa Nautical board. 20 lbs per cu ft. Developed to be a replacement for ply in motorboat transoms. Different densities and percentages of woven roving incorporated in the core.

nautical1.jpg


They are building whole boats with it now. I designed a kit boat for a little lightweight 13' flats skiff using this stuff. A bit more expensive that good Okume marine ply.

Marine026.jpg


Another brand is PenskeBoard.

 

Bowchow

Anarchist
615
13
Coosa BlueWater 26 lbs per cu ft

Just paint this stuff and add some non-skid. 30% lighter than plywood. Cut and route with woodworking tools.

Coosa Nautical board. 20 lbs per cu ft. Developed to be a replacement for ply in motorboat transoms. Different densities and percentages of woven roving incorporated in the core.




Ohhhh I like this. Think I found my material!!  Thank you all!

 
Last edited by a moderator:

Rasputin22

Rasputin22
13,915
3,470
Ohhhh I like this. Think I found my material!!  Thank you all!!!!
I spent a lot of time and effort researching the material and talked with the guys at the factory which makes in here in Alabama. I also checked out the power boat guys over on the Hull Truth who have a huge body of experience. Lots of transom replacements 'rotted ply' and then once the DIY guys worked with it a bit they are doing consoles, fish boxes, Console Hard Tops and lots of improvements on the boats. I even spoke with commercial fishermen that are replacing worn out decks and the are merely adding extra FG on the top side which gets all the wear and tear from traps and fishing gear. 

    Let me know what you figure out and I can perhaps help with specing out the laminates if any that you need. I have a calculator that will work with the Coosa and let you see how much weight and stiffness you get for a given panel size according to what laminates you add. 

 

F18 Sailor

Super Anarchist
2,675
254
Annapolis, MD
That depends on which Divinycell, they make it in various densities (like most foam core options). The Coosa board looks like a really nice plywood replacement for use in wet environments!

 

suider

Super Anarchist
I spent a lot of time and effort researching the material and talked with the guys at the factory which makes in here in Alabama. I also checked out the power boat guys over on the Hull Truth who have a huge body of experience. Lots of transom replacements 'rotted ply' and then once the DIY guys worked with it a bit they are doing consoles, fish boxes, Console Hard Tops and lots of improvements on the boats. I even spoke with commercial fishermen that are replacing worn out decks and the are merely adding extra FG on the top side which gets all the wear and tear from traps and fishing gear. 

    Let me know what you figure out and I can perhaps help with specing out the laminates if any that you need. I have a calculator that will work with the Coosa and let you see how much weight and stiffness you get for a given panel size according to what laminates you add. 
I was scrolling to the bottom to add the same input. We have started using it ALMOST exclusively for repairs where we once used plywood- decks, transoms, bulkheads, etc. The stuff is pretty amazing and really easy to work with.

We used to use the Nida as listed above also (and still do in certain applications) but the Coosa ease of workability, price, etc means it is our go-to now.

 




Top