Constrictor rope clutch??

Alberta

Member
Cousin-Trestec is the inventor and manufacturer. They work extremely well and are my preferred solution anywhere that I don’t have space constraints (they require a good amount of linear deck space for the sleeve and shock cord)

The Class 40 and IMOCA fleets use constrictors for pretty much everything they can. Very lightweight, easy to inspect, and hard to jam. 
 

https://www.cousin-trestec.com/en/produit/en-constrictor/

 

MultiThom

Super Anarchist
1,544
305
Benicia, CA
I wonder if it could be used in place of a hifield lever on a trimaran shroud.  To fold/unfold many folding trimarans, the shrouds have to be loosened then tightened.  Usually with a hifield lever or a series of cascading small diameter lines.  while sailing, the shrouds are loose, tight, loose, tight as tacks are changed; so normally folks don't rely on cleats and I wonder if this device would hold...might simplify some rigging.

 
Svendsen's sells them and are typically in stock.  Get them, you won't regret it. Many other places sell them if you don''t like Svendsens but always good to support local if you can. They hold far better than the spinlocks,  can be released easily under load, don't eat the rope, very few moving parts to break or replace like the spinlocks, are light, simple and they work extremely well.  There are a few isolated cases where they don't work as Alberta mentioned.  Also anywhere they might get accidentally kicked open they're not great.  For example we had one on the side of the cabin top for the tack line but once or twice someone would brush up against the sleeve with their leg and open it up at just the wrong time.  I've been using them for about 4 years now and love them.

I wonder if it could be used in place of a hifield lever on a trimaran shroud.  To fold/unfold many folding trimarans, the shrouds have to be loosened then tightened.  Usually with a hifield lever or a series of cascading small diameter lines.  while sailing, the shrouds are loose, tight, loose, tight as tacks are changed; so normally folks don't rely on cleats and I wonder if this device would hold...might simplify some rigging.
I'm not very familiar with trimaran rigging so take my opinion with a grain of salt.  But, as you lock down the constrictor clutch it moves back a centimeter or so before the sleeve constricts and grabs the line.  If you need a very specific load and tension such as on a shroud it might not work.

 
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Max Rockatansky

Max Rockatansky
3,539
816
I have nine of them. Flawless. But the base is designed for a solid mounting and so you would probably have to lead the line to the deck, turn and thence to the clutch. You could do it like the 31-1D boats with the rig canting. Maybe. The geometry may not work.

 
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MultiThom

Super Anarchist
1,544
305
Benicia, CA
If they can come undone by kicking accidentally, then it isn't something I'd want holding up the rig.  I'd tried something similar (whoopie sling) but that needed slack to slacken so I took that off.  I'll just stick with the cascade.

 
also a topic completely drilled down to the essentials on Zeilersforum.nl  so if your interested and google is your friend, welcome 

these are mine on the runners extremely easy and light to use, just release the thin line and have tremendous holding power, 

hope 

 

KnockedDown

Member
88
0
Kinda thought the OP was looking for a view on the Ronstan/Cousin-Tresteversus the Spinlock XTX Soft Grip. For those without enough lineal length for the Ronstans, what about the XTX?

 

MultiThom

Super Anarchist
1,544
305
Benicia, CA
Kinda thought the OP was looking for a view on the Ronstan/Cousin-Tresteversus the Spinlock XTX Soft Grip. For those without enough lineal length for the Ronstans, what about the XTX?
Actually, I'm looking for a method of shortening a dyneema shroud (holds the mast up).  For some folding trimarans (like mine), you have to first loosen the shroud (something else is holding the mast up), then push out the float, then tighten the shroud for sailing; then go do the other float.  A metal hifield lever was used on some boats  with wire shrouds. What most use now (as do I) is a cascade of smaller diameter dyneema so the shroud can be loosened and tightened with the thin lines knotted off securely.  This works, but is time consuming.  The shrouds are alternately loosened and tightened while sailing (Leeward shroud is always loose).  I'll probably stick with the cascade since it is reliable and nobody wants to get dismasted; but always looking for something to make my sailing more enjoyable.  

I had tried a whoopie sling in this application instead of the cascade; but I found that I needed  slack in the shroud in order to release the sling--which prompted my enquiry about these constrictors since it seems to be the same principle but with a built in method of releasing while loaded.

 
Actually, I'm looking for a method of shortening a dyneema shroud (holds the mast up).  For some folding trimarans (like mine), you have to first loosen the shroud (something else is holding the mast up), then push out the float, then tighten the shroud for sailing; then go do the other float.  A metal hifield lever was used on some boats  with wire shrouds. What most use now (as do I) is a cascade of smaller diameter dyneema so the shroud can be loosened and tightened with the thin lines knotted off securely.  This works, but is time consuming.  The shrouds are alternately loosened and tightened while sailing (Leeward shroud is always loose).  I'll probably stick with the cascade since it is reliable and nobody wants to get dismasted; but always looking for something to make my sailing more enjoyable.  

I had tried a whoopie sling in this application instead of the cascade; but I found that I needed  slack in the shroud in order to release the sling--which prompted my enquiry about these constrictors since it seems to be the same principle but with a built in method of releasing while loaded.
I use a cascade of blocks and constrictor clutches for a 8mm line. If the clutch fails the blocks of the cascade stop them to get any further. After three seasons no problem.
http://f32thriller.blogspot.com/2018/12/canting-rig-option-setup.html
 

 

tDot

Member
233
127
BC
I converted our entire boat over to the Constrictor clutches.  Replaced all of the brand new Spinlocks,  including some of the XX models. The constrictors held better, dropped faster and I grew to love the fact that you could ease different lines without throwing them on a winch. They're so much skinnier I also gained enough room to add in more clutches to convert from 1 line reef to 2 line reefing and a few other lines.

On the halyard clutches, I changed the release line so that the knot was set to pull significantly further.  The halyards dropped faster then they did through the Spinlock XX.

 

joe.barry

New member
43
8
I have 14 Constrictors on my Express 37 for control lines and Genny & Spinnaker staysail sheets. I use the Karver jammers, with remote release lines for the Staysail & A sail tach lines. The jammers are mounted close to the furler drums. 

Love them. I will probably replace all the clutches with Constrictors in the near future.

 

Vincent DePillis

Super Anarchist
1,075
11
Seattle
Getting ready to install constrictor clutches in my new boom.  They will lock the reef lines.  When I go to mock up the installation for the first time, I find that I cannot get the 3/8 inch line through the sleeve at the point where the sleeve enters the clutch cone.  I check the sizing again-- I have the 10mm clutch, supposed to be good for 5/16 - 3/8ths inch line.  Looking into the clutch from an aft viewpoint, the sleeve looks vey narrow as it exits the clutch cone-- like 5 or 6mm.

The reef lines are well used, somewhat fuzzy, but they still measure 3/8ths.  The whipping is a hard spot, but it fits (snugly) in the metal entrance point to the clutch.

Any tips on line sizing and type for optimal performance in this type of clutch, and how to feed the line through the clutch during installation?

 
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